.NODE

Objective 7. Locate Supporting Information

As you research and collect information for a new document, you can store all of the piecestext and pictureson the Office Clipboard. Then, you can go to your document and insertpastethe information one piece at a time. This feature is called collect and paste. Word also has commands to help you locate the right word for a sentence and to locate various elements in a document. For example, you can navigate through a document by moving from one section to the next or from one image to the next.

Alert!: If You Are Not Connected to the Internet

It is recommended that you work through these activities on a computer with an Internet connection. You will not be able to complete Activity 4.17 without a connection.

 

Activity 4.15. Using Collect and Paste to Gather Images

Recall that the Office Clipboard is a temporary storage area maintained by your Windows operating system. When you perform the Copy command or the Cut command, the text that you select is moved onto the Clipboard. From this Clipboard storage area, you can paste text into another location of your document, into another document, or into another Office program. You can copy and then paste a single selection of text without displaying the Clipboard task pane. However, displaying the Clipboard is essential if you want to collect a group of selected text pieces or images and then paste them. The Clipboard can hold up to 24 items, and the Clipboard task pane displays a short representation of each item.

1.

Start Word. From the student files that accompany this textbook, locate and open w04C_Recreation_Ideas. Display the Save As dialog box, and then in your chapter folder, save the file as 4C_Recreation_Ideas_Firstname_Lastname Be sure that nonprinting characters display, and then zoom to Page Width.
 

 

2.

From the Edit menu, click Office Clipboard to display the Clipboard task pane, and then compare your screen with Figure 4.36.
 

Figure 4.36.

 

Another Way: To Display the Clipboard Task Pane

There are two other ways to display the Clipboard task pane:

  • If a different task pane is displayed, click the Other Task Panes arrow and then click Clipboard.
  • Select the first piece of text that you want to copy, hold down , and then quickly press two times.

3.

If the Office Clipboard displays any entries, at the top of the Clipboard task pane, click the Clear All button. From the Insert menu, point to Picture, and then click Clip Art.

The Clip Art task pane replaces the Clipboard task pane.
 

   

4.

In the Search for box, type golf Click the Search in arrow and select the Everywhere check box. Click the Results should be arrow, select the Clip Art check box, and then clear the other check boxes. Click Go. In the Clip Art task pane, point to the image of a woman golfer. If the image shown in Figure 4.37 is not available, refer to the Note below or choose another golf picture.
 


Figure 4.37.

 

NoteInserting Clip Art Images from Your Student Files

Both images used for this activity are included with the files for this chapter. To access those files, from the bottom of the Clip Art task pane, click Organize clips. In the Favorites-Microsoft Clip Organizer dialog box, display the File menu, point to Add Clips to Organizer, and then click On My Own. Use the Look in arrow to navigate to the location of your student files and find w04C_Golfer. Select it and then, in the lower right corner of the dialog box, click Add. When the image displays in the dialog box, move the pointer over the arrow on the right side of the image and then click Copy. Repeat the process to use the w04C_Cycling image. Close the dialog box. When prompted, click the Yes button to copy the image to the Office Clipboard. Continue with Activity 4.15.

   

5.

Point to the image of the woman golfer, click the arrow, and then click Copy to copy the image to the Clipboard. In the title bar of the Clip Art task pane, click the Other Task Panes arrow . From the task pane menu, click Clipboard.

The image you selected displays in the Clipboard task pane. When copying clip art, you must redisplay the Clipboard after you copy an image; otherwise, the next image you copy will replace the current image.
 


6.

In the title bar of the Clipboard task pane, click the Other Task Panes arrow . From the task pane menu, click Clip Art. In the Search for box, type cycling and then click Go. In the Clip Art task pane, point to the image of a cyclist on a trail.

If the image shown in Figure 4.38 is not available, choose another similar image, or consult the previous Note box to find w04C_Cycling from your student files.
 

Figure 4.38.

 

7.

On the image of the cyclist, click the arrow and then click Copy to transfer the image to the Clipboard. In the title bar of the Clip Art task pane, click the Other Task Panes arrow. From the task pane menu, click Clipboard. Click Save and then compare your screen with Figure 4.38.

Both images are displayed in the Clipboard task pane, with the most recently copied image at the top.
 

Activity 4.16. Collecting Information from Other Documents

If you need information from another document, you can open the source document, copy the text you need onto the Clipboard, and then paste it into your document later.

1.

Be sure your 4C_Recreation_Ideas document is still displayed on your screen, and the Clipboard task pane displays the two images you have copied. Click the Open button , and then from your student files, locate and open the file w04C_Golf_Text.
 

 

2.

In the w04C_Golf_Text file, hold down and press to select all the text. On the Standard toolbar, click the Copy button to copy the text to the Clipboard. In the upper right corner of your screen, to the right of the Type a question for help box, click the Close Window button to close the file.
 

3.

Using the technique you just practiced, copy the text from the w04C_Bicycle_Text file to the Clipboard, and then compare your Clipboard with Figure 4.39.
 

Figure 4.39.


Notice that as new items are copied to the Office Clipboard, the most recent item displays at the top of the list.
 

Activity 4.17. Finding Supporting Information Using the Research Tool

Word includes a research tool with which you can search for information on a variety of topics. You will need an Internet connection to complete this activity.

   

1.

On the Standard toolbar, click the Research button to display the Research task pane. In the Search for box, type golf Under the Search for box, in the second box, click the arrow, and then click Encarta Encyclopedia. Compare your screen with Figure 4.40.
 


Figure 4.40.


Your screen may indicate only Encyclopedia or it may display the language and version of the active encyclopedia. A list of golf topics displays.
 

2.

In the Research task pane list of topics, scroll down if necessary, and then click History.

The program moves to the MSN Encarta site on the Web. The History section, which is in the middle of the document, displays near the top of the screen.
 

Alert!: If Nothing Displays in the Encarta Window

If nothing displays in the Encarta window, on the left side of the screen scroll down if necessary and click History again.

   

3.

Scroll down as necessary and move the pointer to the left of the top paragraph that begins Some historians believe, and then drag to the end of the second sentence, which ends the 14th or 15th century, to select the two sentences. Compare your screen with Figure 4.41.
 


Figure 4.41.


Be sure you have only the two sentences selected. Because the information on Web sites changes often, the information on your screen may differ slightly.
 

More Knowledge: Being Careful of Copyright Issues

Nearly everything you find on the Web is protected by copyright law, which protects authors of original works, including text, art, photographs, and music. If you want to use text or graphics that you find online, you will need to get permission. One of the exceptions to this law is the use of small amounts of information for educational purposes, which falls under Fair Use guidelines.

Copyright laws in the United States are open to different interpretations, and copyright laws can be very different in other countries. As a general rule, if you want to use someone else's material, always get permission first.

4.

From the Edit menu, click Copy to add the text to the clipboard. Alternatively, right-click the selected text and from the shortcut menu click Copy. Close the Internet Explorer window.
 

5.

In the title bar of the Research task pane, click the Other Task Panes arrow . From the task pane menu, click Clipboard, and notice that the text you copied displays on the Clipboard.
 

 

6.

Click the Other Task Panes arrow again and click Research. Use the technique you just practiced to research the bicycle You may have to scroll down the topics area to find History of the Modern Bicycle. Select and copy the first three sentences of the History area, and then display the Clipboard task pane. Compare your screen with Figure 4.42.
 

Figure 4.42.


You should have six items in your Clipboard task pane.
 

Activity 4.18. Pasting Information from the Clipboard Task Pane

After you have collected text and images from other documents or sources, such as the Internet, you can paste them into your document.

   

1.

With your 4C_Recreation_Ideas file displayed, locate the text Golf, and then directly below it, click in the blank line under Draft of article. On the Clipboard task pane, under Click an item to paste, click the fourth item in the item list, the one that begins The Desert Park Fine Arts. Compare your screen to Figure 4.43.
 


Figure 4.43.


The text is pasted into the document at the insertion point location.
 

2.

Below the text you just pasted, click in the blank line under Quote from Encarta for Did You Know? boxes. From the Click an item to paste list on the Clipboard task pane, click the second item in the list, the one that begins Some historians believe.

The text is placed at the insertion point, and retains the font and font size used in the MSN Encarta Web site.
 

   

3.

Click to position the insertion point in the blank line under Image. From the Click an item to paste list on the Clipboard task pane, click the sixth item in the item list, the graphic of the golfer. Select the graphic, point to the lower right sizing handle, and drag upward to shrink the image so that it moves to the bottom of the first page and the word Bicycling is at the top of Page 2. Compare your screen with Figure 4.44.
 


Figure 4.44.

 

4.

Display Page 2 of the document. In the BICYCLING section, click in the blank line under the text Draft of article. On the Clipboard task pane, click the third item, which begins The "Golden Age" of bicycling.
 

   

5.

Click in the blank line under Quote from Encarta for Did You Know? boxes and paste the text that begins The bicycle was not invented. If extra space appears to be inserted above the inserted text, use the Format Painter button to copy the format from the Encarta text on Page 1 to this inserted text. Adjust any other spacing as necessary. Compare your screen with Figure 4.45.
 


Figure 4.45.

 

6.

Click in the blank line under Image and paste the graphic of the bicyclists. Then, on the Clipboard task pane, point to the first item in the list, click the displayed arrow, and then from the menu, click Delete.

The item is removed from the list. You can remove one item from the Clipboard without disturbing the other items stored there.
 

7.

At the top of the Clipboard task pane, click Clear All to remove the remaining items from the Clipboard. In the title bar of the Clipboard task pane, click the Close button . Save the document.
 

Activity 4.19. Using the Thesaurus

The thesaurus is a language tool that assists in your writing by suggesting synonymswords that have the same meaningfor words that you select.

1.

From the Edit menu, click Find. In the Find and Replace dialog box, in the Find what box, type training and click Find Next.

The word training in the Golf section is highlighted.
 

 

2.

In the Find and Replace dialog box, click Cancel. Right-click the selected word. From the shortcut menu, point to Synonyms to display a list of synonyms, as shown in Figure 4.46.
 

Figure 4.46.

 

3.

In the list of synonyms, click instruction.

Instruction replaces training in the document.
 

4.

From the Edit menu, click Find. In the Find and Replace dialog box, in the Find what box, type impact and click Find Next. In the Find and Replace dialog box, click Cancel to close the dialog box. Right-click the selected word. From the shortcut menu, point to Synonyms.

A list of synonyms displays. Sometimes the best word is not included in the list of synonyms.
 

 

5.

At the bottom of the synonym list, click Thesaurus. Compare your screen with Figure 4.47.
 

Figure 4.47.


The Research task pane displays and lists words from the English Thesaurus. Notice that there are more options available.
 

6.

In the Research task pane, point to influence, click the down arrow on the right side of the word, and then, from the displayed list, click Insert.

Influence replaces impact in the document.
 

7.

In the title bar of the Research task pane, click the Close button . Save the document.
 


[Page 539 (continued)]

Objective 8 Find Objects with the Select Browse Object Button

Windows XP

Outlook 2003

Internet Explorer

Computer Concepts

Word 2003

Chapter One. Creating Documents with Microsoft Word 2003

Chapter Two. Formatting and Organizing Text

Chapter Three. Using Graphics and Tables

Chapter Four. Using Special Document Formats, Columns, and Mail Merge

Excel 2003

Chapter One. Creating a Worksheet and Charting Data

Chapter Two. Designing Effective Worksheets

Chapter Three. Using Functions and Data Tables

Access 2003

Chapter One. Getting Started with Access Databases and Tables

Chapter Two. Sort, Filter, and Query a Database

Chapter Three. Forms and Reports

Powerpoint 2003

Chapter One. Getting Started with PowerPoint 2003

Chapter Two. Creating a Presentation

Chapter Three. Formatting a Presentation

Integrated Projects

Chapter One. Using Access Data with Other Office Applications

Chapter Two. Using Tables in Word and Excel

Chapter Three. Using Excel as a Data Source in a Mail Merge

Chapter Four. Linking Data in Office Documents

Chapter Five. Creating Presentation Content from Office Documents

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Go! With Microsoft Office 2003 Brief
GO! with Microsoft Office 2003 Brief (2nd Edition)
ISBN: 0131878646
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2004
Pages: 448
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