.NODE

Objective 3. Maximize, Restore, Minimize, and Close a Window

You can maximize a window, which enlarges the window to occupy the entire screen, and you can restore a window, which reduces the window to the size it was before being maximized. You can also minimize a window, which reduces the window to a button on the taskbar, removing it from the screen entirely without actually closing it. When you need to view the window again, you can click the taskbar button to bring it back into view.

Activity 1.3. Maximizing, Restoring, Minimizing, and Closing a Window

In the following activity, you will maximize, restore, minimize, and close the My Computer window.

1.

In the upper right corner of the My Computer window, on the My Computer title bar, point to the Maximize button , and then compare your screen with Figure 1.17.
 

Figure 1.17.


The Maximize button is the middle button in the group of three. When you point to it, a ScreenTip displays. Recall that a ScreenTip describes a button or screen element.
 
 

2.

Click the Maximize button , and then compare your screen with Figure 1.18. Alternatively, maximize or restore a window by double-clicking anywhere in the window's title bar.
 

Figure 1.18.


The My Computer window occupies the entire screen. The Maximize button is replaced by the Restore Down button, which has a different icon.
 

3.

On the My Computer title bar, click the Restore Down button to return the window to the size it was before it was Maximized.
 

   

4.

On the My Computer title bar, click the Minimize button , and then compare your screen with Figure 1.19.
 


 

Figure 1.19.


The My Computer program is still running but the window is minimized. It is represented by a button on the taskbar at the bottom of the screen. The window is not closed, only temporarily hidden from view.
 

5.

On the taskbar, click the My Computer button.

The window redisplays in the same size and location it occupied when you clicked the Minimize button.
 

6.

On the taskbar, click the Start button , point to All Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Calculator. Point to the Calculator window title bar and drag the Calculator window near the left side of the screen. Notice that both open programs display on the taskbar.

My Computer is a program that helps you manage and organize the space on drives attached to your computer. Calculator is a program that performs basic arithmetic. Both programs occupy their own window, with the Calculator program in front of the My Computer window. Calculator becomes the active window, indicated by its darker blue title bar. When two or more windows are open, the active window is the window in which the cursor movements, commands, or text entry occur.
 

   

7.

Click anywhere on the My Computer window, and notice that the My Computer window moves to the front, as shown in Figure 1.20.
 


 

Figure 1.20.

 
   

8.

On the taskbar, click the Calculator button to move the calculator window to the front. On the taskbar, click the Start button , point to All Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Paint. Notice that all three open programs display on the taskbar, as shown in Figure 1.21.
 

Figure 1.21.

(This item is displayed on page 24 in the print version)


Paint, a program that comes with Windows XP, creates and edits drawings and displays and edits scanned photos. The Calculator program window is still open, but it is likely hidden behind the other windows.
 
 

9.

On the Paint title bar, click the Close button . On the Calculator title bar, click the Close button . On the My Computer window title bar, click the Close button .
 

More Knowledge: Keeping More Than One Program Window Open at a Time

The ability to keep more than one window open at a time will become more useful as you become more familiar with Microsoft Office. For example, if you want to take information from two word processing documents to create a third document, you can open all three documents and use the taskbar to move among them, copying and pasting text from one document to another. Or, you could copy a chart from Excel and paste it into Word or take a table of data and paste it into PowerPoint. You can even have the same document open in two windows.



Objective 4 Create a New Folder

Windows XP

Outlook 2003

Internet Explorer

Computer Concepts

Word 2003

Chapter One. Creating Documents with Microsoft Word 2003

Chapter Two. Formatting and Organizing Text

Chapter Three. Using Graphics and Tables

Chapter Four. Using Special Document Formats, Columns, and Mail Merge

Excel 2003

Chapter One. Creating a Worksheet and Charting Data

Chapter Two. Designing Effective Worksheets

Chapter Three. Using Functions and Data Tables

Access 2003

Chapter One. Getting Started with Access Databases and Tables

Chapter Two. Sort, Filter, and Query a Database

Chapter Three. Forms and Reports

Powerpoint 2003

Chapter One. Getting Started with PowerPoint 2003

Chapter Two. Creating a Presentation

Chapter Three. Formatting a Presentation

Integrated Projects

Chapter One. Using Access Data with Other Office Applications

Chapter Two. Using Tables in Word and Excel

Chapter Three. Using Excel as a Data Source in a Mail Merge

Chapter Four. Linking Data in Office Documents

Chapter Five. Creating Presentation Content from Office Documents

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Go! With Microsoft Office 2003 Brief
GO! with Microsoft Office 2003 Brief (2nd Edition)
ISBN: 0131878646
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2004
Pages: 448
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