.NODE

Preventing the Most Common Messages from Being Logged

Problem

You want to disable the router from creating link up/down syslog messages on unimportant router interfaces.

Solution

Use the no logging event configuration commands to disable the logging of common interface level messages:

Router#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#interface Serial0/0
Router(config-if)#no logging event link-status
Router(config-if)#no logging event dlci-status-change
Router(config-if)#no logging event subif-link-status 
Router(config-if)#exit
Router(config)#end 
Router#

 

Discussion

By default, log messages are sent whenever a router interface status changes states. Generally, you want to see log messages that indicate that an interface status has changed, but there are times when it can be useful to disable these types of messages. For instance, dial interfaces may cycle up and down many times throughout the course of a normal day without being cause for concern. Having the capability to suppress these messages helps keep logs uncluttered and can prevent network management staff from wasting time responding to unnecessary trouble reports:

%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Serial0, changed state to down
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Serial0, changed state to down
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Serial0, changed state to up
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Serial0, changed state to up

The example above shows the log messages that are sent when a router interface changes states from up to down and back to up. You can use the no logging event link-status command to suppress these messages.

On frame-relay interfaces, DLCI state changes trigger the router to create log messages. In large Frame Relay-based networks, many DLCI changes can occur daily, which can clutter logs and open duplicate trouble reports. Using the no logging event dlci-status-change configuration command will prevent these log messages from being created:

%FR-5-DLCICHANGE: Interface Serial0 - DLCI 50 state changed to INACTIVE
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Serial0.1, changed state to down
%FR-5-DLCICHANGE: Interface Serial0 - DLCI 50 state changed to ACTIVE
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Serial0.1, changed state to up

Finally, subinterface link up or down messages can be suppressed by using the no logging event subif-link-status configuration command. The example below demonstrates a typical frame-relay interface failure. Notice that the router sends a "line protocol down" log message for the main interface, as well as each of the subinterfaces. Although this example only shows one subinterface, it is not uncommon to see dozens of subinterfaces on a single physical interface. In these cases, it can be useful to suppress subinterface messages:

%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Serial0, changed state to down
%FR-5-DLCICHANGE: Interface Serial0 - DLCI 50 state changed to DELETED
%FR-5-DLCICHANGE: Interface Serial0 - DLCI 102 state changed to DELETED
%FR-5-DLCICHANGE: Interface Serial0 - DLCI 103 state changed to DELETED
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Serial0.1, changed state to down
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Serial0, changed state to down


Router Configuration and File Management

Router Management

User Access and Privilege Levels

TACACS+

IP Routing

RIP

EIGRP

OSPF

BGP

Frame Relay

Handling Queuing and Congestion

Tunnels and VPNs

Dial Backup

NTP and Time

DLSw

Router Interfaces and Media

Simple Network Management Protocol

Logging

Access-Lists

DHCP

NAT

First Hop Redundancy Protocols

IP Multicast

IP Mobility

IPv6

MPLS

Security

Appendix 1. External Software Packages

Appendix 2. IP Precedence, TOS, and DSCP Classifications

Index

show all menu





Cisco IOS Cookbook
Cisco IOS Cookbook (Cookbooks (OReilly))
ISBN: 0596527225
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2004
Pages: 505
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