Objective 5. Navigate the Word Window

Because most Word documents are larger than the Word window, use scroll bars to navigatemove withina document. Keyboard shortcuts are another way to navigate your document quickly. Keyboard shortcuts provide additional navigation techniques that you cannot accomplish with scroll bars. For example, using keyboard shortcuts, you can move the insertion point to the beginning or end of a word or line.

Activity 1.13. Opening and Closing an Existing Document

1.

Start Word if necessary. On the Standard toolbar, click the Open button .
 

2.

In the Open dialog box, click the Look in arrow at the right edge of the Look in box to view a list of the drives available on your system. Compare your screen with Figure 1.28.
 

Figure 1.28.

 
   

3.

Navigate to the location where the student files for this textbook are stored, which might be on a CD that came with your textbook, or in some other location designated by your instructor. Locate w01B_Party_Themes and click once to select it. Then, in the lower right corner of the Open dialog box, click the Open button. Alternatively, double-click the file name. If necessary, on the Standard toolbar, click the Show/Hide ¶ button to display the nonprinting characters.
 


The document displays in the Word window, as shown in Figure 1.29. This text will be inserted into a new document in Activity 1.14.
 

Figure 1.29.

 

4.

From the File menu, click Close to close the document and leave Word open.
 

NoteTurning Off the Office Assistant

One of Word's Help features is an animated object called the Office Assistant. Many people like to turn off this feature. To hide the Office Assistant, click the right mouse button on the Office Assistant. In the menu that displays, click Hide. The instruction in this textbook assumes that the Office Assistant is turned off.

 

Activity 1.14. Inserting Existing Text into a New Document

   

1.

From the File menu, click New, and then notice the New Document task pane to the right of the document window. Compare your screen with Figure 1.30.
 


 

Figure 1.30.

 

2.

In the New Document task pane, under New, click Blank document. If necessary, on the Standard toolbar, click the Show/Hide ¶ button to display the nonprinting characters.

A new blank document displays, and the New Document pane closes.
 

   

3.

On the menu bar, click Insert, and then click File. In the Insert File dialog box, click the Look in arrow and navigate to the location where the student files for this textbook are stored. Locate w01B_Party_Themes, click once to select it, and then click the Insert button.

A copy of the text from the w01B_Party_Themes document is inserted into the blank document, the last page of the four-page document displays, and the insertion point displays at the end of the inserted text. The original w01B_Party_Themes document remains intact and undisturbed. Compare your screen with Figure 1.31.
 


 

Figure 1.31.

 

4.

On the Standard toolbar, click the Save button . In the Save As dialog box, click the Save in arrow and navigate to the location where you are storing your files for this chapter.

Recall that because this is a new unnamed documentDocument2 or some other number displays in the blue title barthe Save As dialog box displays to allow you to give the document a name and designate a storage location. The first line of text in the document displays in the File name box.
 

5.

In the File name box, delete any existing text, and then using your own first and last name, type 1B_Party_Themes_Firstname_Lastname and then click Save.
 

   

6.

From the View menu, click Header and Footer. On the Header and Footer toolbar, click the Switch Between Header and Footer button to move to the footer area. On the Header and Footer toolbar, click the Insert AutoText button , and then click Filename. On the Header and Footer toolbar, click the Close button .
 


The file name is inserted in the footer. The file extension .doc may or may not display, depending on your computer's settings.
 

7.

Save your document.
 

Activity 1.15. Navigating a Document

1.

At the right of your screen, in the vertical scroll bar, locate the up arrow at the top of the bar as shown in Figure 1.32. Then, click the up scroll arrow five times.
 

Figure 1.32.


Notice that the document scrolls up one line at a time.
 

2.

Point to the up scroll arrow again. Click and hold down the mouse button for several seconds.

The document text scrolls up continuously, a line at a time.
 

3.

At the top of the vertical scroll bar, point to the up scroll arrow, and then click and hold down the mouse button until you have scrolled to the top of the document. As you do so, notice that the scroll box moves up in the scroll barlike an elevator going to the top floor.
 

   

4.

Near the top of the vertical scroll bar, point to the scroll box, and then press and hold down the left mouse button.
 


A ScreenTipa small box that displays information about, or the name of, a screen elementdisplays. In this instance, the ScreenTip indicates the page number, as shown in Figure 1.33. The page number and total number of pages in the document are displayed in the status barin this case page 1 of 4 pages.
 

Figure 1.33.

 

5.

Draghold down the left mouse button while moving your mousethe scroll box slowly down to the bottom of the scroll bar. As you do so, notice that the ScreenTip changes as each new page reaches the top of the screen.
 

6.

Release the mouse button, and then click in the light area above the scroll box.

The document scrolls up one screen. This is a quick way to scan a document.
 

7.

Practice clicking in the area above and below the scroll box.
 

Another Way: To ScrollUse the Wheel Button on the Mouse

If your mouse has a small wheel button between the left and right mouse buttons, you can scroll up and down in the document by rotating the wheel.

 

8.

On your keyboard, hold down and press .

The top of the document displays, and the insertion point moves to the left of the first word in the document. In this document, Word has flagged some spelling and grammar errors (red and green wavy lines), which you will correct in Activity 1.19.
 

9.

Hold down and press . Press once to move the insertion point to the right of the last charactera close parenthesisin the document.

In the status bar, the page number displays 4/4, indicating that you are viewing Page 4 of a 4-page document.
 

10.

Press to scroll the document up one screen. Press .

The insertion point moves to the end of the current line of text. Take a moment to study the table shown in Figure 1.34, which lists the most commonly used keyboard shortcuts.
 

Figure 1.34. Navigating a Document Using Keyboard Shortcuts

To Move

Press

To the beginning of a document

To the end of a document

To the beginning of a line

To the end of a line

To the beginning of the previous word

To the beginning of the next word

To the beginning of the current word (if insertion point is in the middle of a word)

To the beginning of the previous paragraph

To the beginning of the next paragraph

To the beginning of the current paragraph (if insertion point is in the middle of a paragraph)

Up one screen

Down one screen

 

11.

Hold down and press to position the insertion point at the beginning of the document.
 


Activity 1.16. Changing Views and Displaying the Task Pane

1.

In the lower left corner of your screen, to the left of the horizontal scroll bar, locate the View buttons.

Use these buttons to switch to different document views. Alternatively, you can switch views using the commands on the View menu.
 

Another Way: To View Documents

There are five ways to view your document on the screen. Each view is useful in different situations.

  • Print Layout view displays the page borders, margins, text, and graphics as they will look when you print the document. Most Word users prefer this view for most tasks, and it is the default view.
  • Normal view simplifies the page layout for quick typing, and shows a little more text on the screen than the Print Layout view. Graphics, headers, and footers do not display.
  • Web Layout view shows how the document will look when saved as a Web page and viewed in a Web browser.
  • Reading Layout view creates easy-to-read pages that fit on the screen to increase legibility. This view does not represent the pages as they would print. Each screen page is labeled with a screen number, rather than a page number.
  • Outline view shows the organizational structure of your document by headings and subheadings and can be collapsed and expanded to look at individual sections of a document.
   

2.

Click the Normal View button .
 


The work area covers the entire width of the screen. Page margins, inserted graphics, headers, and footers do not display. Compare your screen with Figure 1.35.
 

Figure 1.35.

 

3.

Click the Reading Layout button .

An entire page is displayed, and the text reaches nearly to the bottom. However, this is only about half of the text that is actually on the page as it is formatted and if it were printed. This view has its own toolbars and is optimized for easy reading. You can display side-by-side pages in longer documents, and you can edit the document in this view.
 

NoteOpening the Reading Layout View

The Reading Layout view is also accessible by clicking the Read button on the Standard toolbar.

4.

At the top of the screen, in the Reading Layout toolbar, click Close .

Closing the Reading Layout view returns you to the previous view, which was Normal view.
 

 

5.

At the left of the horizontal scroll bar, click the Print Layout View button .

In this view you can see all of the elements that will display on paper when you print the document. The instruction in this textbook will use the Print Layout view for most documents.
 

6.

From the View menu, click Task Pane. At the top of the task pane, click the Other Task Panes arrow to the right of the task pane name, and from the displayed list, click Getting Started. Compare your screen with Figure 1.36.
 

Figure 1.36.


As you progress in your study of Word, you will see various task panes to assist you in accomplishing Word tasks.
 
 

7.

From the View menu, click Task Pane again to close the task pane. Alternatively, click the task pane Close button.

For the remainder of this book the task pane should be closed, except when otherwise instructed.
 

Activity 1.17. Using the Zoom Button

To zoom means to increase or decrease the viewing area of the screen. You can zoom in to look closely at a particular section of a document, and then zoom out to see a whole page on the screen. You can also zoom to view multiple pages on the screen.

1.

On the Standard toolbar, click the Zoom button arrow to display the Zoom list as shown in Figure 1.37.
 

Figure 1.37.

 
 

2.

On the displayed list, click 150% to magnify the view of the text as shown in Figure 1.38.
 

Figure 1.38.

 

3.

On the Standard toolbar, click the Zoom button arrow again, and then click Two Pages.

Two full pages display on the screen. This magnification enables you to see how the text is laid out on the page and to check the location of other document elements, such as graphics.
 

   

4.

On the vertical scroll bar, click the down scroll arrow five times. Notice that you can now see parts of four pages, and you can see how the text flows from one page to another. Compare your screen with Figure 1.39.
 


Figure 1.39.

 

5.

On the Standard toolbar, click the Zoom button arrow and from the displayed list, click Page Width.

This is a flexible magnification, displaying the maximum page width, regardless of the size of your screen. The size shown in the Zoom box will vary depending on screen size and resolution. You will likely find that using the Page Width setting will provide the most comfortable screen viewing.
 

6.

On the Standard toolbar, click on the number in the Zoom box to highlight the number currently displayed. Type 100 and then press .

Typing a number directly into the Zoom box is another method of changing the zoom level.
 


[Page 273 (continued)]

Objective 6 Add a Graphic to a Document





Go! With Microsoft Office 2003 Brief
GO! with Microsoft Office 2003 Brief (2nd Edition)
ISBN: 0131878646
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2004
Pages: 448
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