POSIX Conventions for Command Line Arguments

Command line arguments in a program may cause that program to be unportable (that is, it will not be 100% Pure Java). If a program requires command line arguments, it should follow the POSIX conventions for them. The POSIX conventions are summarized here.

  • An option is a hyphen followed by a single alphanumeric character, like this: -o.
  • An option may require an argument, which must appear immediately after the option: for example, -o argument or -oargument.
  • Options that do not require arguments can be grouped after a hyphen, so, for example, -lst is equivalent to -t -l -s.
  • Options can appear in any order; thus, -lst is equivalent to -tls.
  • Options can appear multiple times.
  • Options precede other nonoption arguments: -lst nonoption.
  • The -- argument terminates options.
  • The - option is typically used to represent one of the standard input streams.

Getting Started

Object-Oriented Programming Concepts

Language Basics

Object Basics and Simple Data Objects

Classes and Inheritance

Interfaces and Packages

Handling Errors Using Exceptions

Threads: Doing Two or More Tasks at Once

I/O: Reading and Writing

User Interfaces That Swing

Appendix A. Common Problems and Their Solutions

Appendix B. Internet-Ready Applets

Appendix C. Collections

Appendix D. Deprecated Thread Methods

Appendix E. Reference



The Java Tutorial(c) A Short Course on the Basics
The Java Tutorial: A Short Course on the Basics, 4th Edition
ISBN: 0321334205
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2002
Pages: 125

Similar book on Amazon

Flylib.com © 2008-2017.
If you may any questions please contact us: flylib@qtcs.net