List of Figures

Fig 1.1 Growth, or new value creation, in the organization comes only from projects
Fig 1.2 Projects and processes
Fig 1.3 Project difficulty
Fig 1.4 The five project process groups
Fig 2.1 Structure and style
Fig 2.2 A taxonomy of organizations with respect to their implications for project management
Fig 2.3 Types of organizational structure and their implications for project management

  1. The functional organization in its purest form

  2. The functional organization in weak matrix form

  3. One possible example of the pure form of the matrix organization

Fig 2.4 A representative organizational structure of a project
Fig 2.5 Personal working styles: task focus, maintenance focus
Fig 2.6 Some examples of various project lifecycles
Fig 2.7 Cost and probability of completion

  1. What a typical project looks like in terms of costs and risks, and to what extent its outcomes can be influenced

  2. As the project proceeds, risks reduce but the ability to influence its outcomes, and especially to change them, decreases

Fig 3.1 The five project process groups and their deliverables

  1. Basic outline

  2. Some of the major interconnections between process groups and other assets

Fig 3.2 The OODA loop
Fig 3.3 The Plan Do Check Act loop
Fig 3.4 The initiating process group

  1. Develop project charter

  2. Develop preliminary project scope statement

Fig 4.1 Projects must obtain the use of assets and processes beyond their control

  1. The problem: a large gap between what the project needs, and what it has. Projects do not control sufficient resources and processes for their success

  2. The solution: understand where you can influence; and where you can't influence things, at least build a system to ensure you know what is happening

Fig 4.2 A Gantt chart showing dependency relationship
Fig 4.3a Example work breakdown structure (WBS) for 'House Build' project
Fig 4.3b Example of excessive detail in a WBS
Fig 4.3c Example of completed WBS, showing effort and duration in days (d) or weeks (w)
Fig 4.4 Project Grapple Gantt chart
Fig 4.5 Project initiation, before and after
Fig 4.6 Project integration management processes, concepts, tools and techniques, outputs and inputs, showing when they are typically used and what kinds of tool they are
Fig 5.1 Project scope management sequence of processes and activities
Fig 6.1 Network diagram
Fig 6.2 Network diagram showing dummy dependency
Fig 6.3 Network diagram showing the critical path
Fig 7.1 The cost estimating process
Fig 7.2 The four approaches to cost estimation
Fig 7.3 The cost budgeting process
Fig 7.4 The cost control process
Fig 8.1 The quality planning process
Fig 8.2 The quality assurance process
Fig 8.3 The quality control process
Fig 8.4 Cause and effect diagram (also known as a fishbone diagram), with example
Fig 8.5 Formal symbology conventions for use in flowcharts
Fig 8.6 Example of a flowchart, with formal symbols
Fig 8.7 Example of a control chart, of a process in control
Fig 8.8 Control charts: (a) in control; (b) two ways to be out of control
Fig 9.1 The two great dynamics in project HR management
Fig 9.2 The HR planning process
Fig 9.3 Hierarchical organization chart
Fig 9.4 A matrix-based responsibility chart
Fig 9.5 The acquire project team process
Fig 9.6 The develop project team process
Fig 9.7 The manage project team process
Fig 10.1 The communication planning process
Fig 10.2 The information distribution process
Fig 10.3 Performance reporting
Fig 10.4 Example of regular project report to project sponsor
Fig 10.5 Manage stakeholders
Fig 11.1 The risk management planning process
Fig 11.2 The risk identification process
Fig 11.3 The qualitative risk analysis process
Fig 11.4 The quantitative risk analysis process
Fig 11.5 Decision tree for a factory refurbishment
Fig 11.6 The risk response planning process
Fig 11.7 The risk monitoring and control process
Fig 12.1 Project procurement management sequence of processes and activities
Fig 12.2 Level of risk experienced by buyer and seller for different contract types
Fig 12.3 Contract administration activities involved to meet contractual requirements
Fig A.1 Activity merge bias
Fig A.2 The cumulative effect of buffers on each task
Fig A.3 The effect of aggregating contingencies is to reduce the total buffer time from four weeks (Fig. A.2) to two weeks
Fig A.4 Skewed distribution for a single task
Fig A.5 The distribution for aggregated tasks tends to the symmetrical 'normal' distribution
Fig A.6 Activities merging onto critical chain
Fig A.7 Feed buffer
Fig A.8 Multitasking
Fig A.9 Buffer usage and project status
Fig C.1 PMP or CAPM decision tree


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Definitive Guide to Project Management. The Fast Track to Getting the Job Done on Time and on Budget
The Definitive Guide to Project Management: The fast track to getting the job done on time and on budget (2nd Edition)
ISBN: 0273710974
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2007
Pages: 217
Authors: Sebastian Nokes
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