Conventions

Throughout the book, concrete programming constructs or program output are presented in a monospaced font. For example, when abstractly discussing server-side programs that use HTTP, we might refer to "HTTP servlets" or just "servlets," but when we say HttpServlet we are talking about a specific Java class.

User input is indicated in boldface, and command-line prompts are either generic ( Prompt> ) or indicate the operating system to which they apply ( DOS> ). For instance, the following indicates that " Some Output " is the result when " java SomeProgram " is executed on any platform.

 
 Prompt>  java SomeProgram  Some Output 

URLs, filenames, and directory names are presented in a sansserif font. So, for example, we would say "the StringTokenizer class" (monospaced because we're talking about the class name ) and "Listing such and such shows SomeFile.java " (sans-serif because we're talking about the filename). Paths use forward slashes as in URLs unless they are specific to the Windows operating system. So, for instance, we would use a forward slash when saying "look in install_dir /bin " (OS neutral) but use backslashes when saying "see C:\Windows\Temp " (Windows specific).

Important standard techniques are indicated by specially marked entries, as in the following example.

Core Approach

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Pay particular attention to items in "Core Approach" sections. They indicate techniques that should always or almost always be used.


Notes and warnings are called out in a similar manner.



Core Servlets and JavaServer Pages (Vol. 1.Core Technologies)
Core Servlets and Javaserver Pages: Core Technologies, Vol. 1 (2nd Edition)
ISBN: 0130092290
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2002
Pages: 194

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