Rewards for Playing the Role

In real life, there are all sorts of obvious and subtle rewards for doing a good job in certain roles, such as the roles of friend, father, mother, citizen, and so on. Rewards can encourage players to adopt a role as well.

These rewards can come in a variety of forms, such as:

  • Admiration by strangers.

  • Admiration by NPCs who are your colleagues.

  • Having a reputation that spreads to NPCs you haven't met, but who, by your reputation alone, place you on a pedestal (or fear you) when they meet you.

  • Admiration or fondness by an NPC who's an attractive member of the opposite sex.

  • Admiration by the NPC who is your boss or superior in the game.

  • Immediate rewards for a job well done. For instance, if you do a good job on a mission in your FBI role, you're given a better car to drive or a new group of great weapons.

  • Access to places that others in the game are denied. Maybe it's a penthouse office.

  • Being let off the hook from debts, obligations, and the like.

  • Negative attention. In Grand Theft Auto III, it's tremendous fun to cause so much mayhem that every cop in the city is after you.

graphics/27inf25.gif

The illustration on the left is of an example game scenario. You play the bad-ass gunslinger who just rid the city of its worst villain the leader of a heavily armed crime ring.

And now you're being rewarded with the red-carpet treatment and a choice of great, high-tech weapons.

The scene shows several rewards:

  • Admiration

  • Acknowledgment

  • Access to special places (the penthouse)

  • Tangible rewards (the weapons)

All of these work as Role Induction Techniques.



Creating Emotion in Games. The Craft and Art of Emotioneering
Creating Emotion in Games: The Craft and Art of Emotioneering
ISBN: 1592730078
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2003
Pages: 394

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