Locking Contention and Deadlocks


Locking Contention and Deadlocks

In the grand scheme of things, the most likely culprits of SQL Server application performance problems are typically poorly written queries, poor database and index design, and locking contention. Whereas the first two problems will result in poor application performance regardless of the number of users on the system, locking contention becomes more of a performance problem the greater the number of users. It is further compounded by increasingly complex or long-running transactions.

Locking contention occurs when a transaction requests a lock type on a resource that is incompatible with an existing lock type on the resource. By default, the process will wait indefinitely for the lock resource to become available. Locking contention is noticed in the client application by the apparent lack of response from SQL Server.

Figure 38.11 demonstrates an example of locking contention. Process 1 has initiated a transaction and acquired an exclusive lock on page 1:325. Before Process 1 can acquire the lock that it needs on page 1:341 to complete its transaction, Process 2 acquires an exclusive lock on page 1:314. Until Process 2 commits or rolls back its transaction and releases the lock on Page 1:341, the lock will continue to be held. Because this is not a deadlock scenario (which will be covered in the "Deadlocks" subsection later in this section), SQL Server takes no action. Process 1 simply waits indefinitely.

Figure 38.11. Locking contention between two processes.

graphics/38fig11.gif

Identifying Locking Contention

When a client application appears to freeze after submitting a query, it often is due to locking contention. To identify locking contention between processes, you can use Enterprise Manager as discussed earlier in this chapter in the "Monitoring Lock Activity in SQL Server" section, or the system-stored procedures sp_who and sp_lock .

TIP

I prefer to use sp_who and sp_lock because they tend to be faster than using Enterprise Manager. Sometimes, because of the additional information that Enterprise Manager is trying to display, it can become blocked by locking activity in tempdb and not display anything. The sp_who and sp_lock system procedures, as well as querying the syslockinfo table directly, will still work. Also, when sp who and sp lock are run in Query Analyzer, it is easier and faster to refresh the resultsets than it is to refresh the display in Enterprise Manager. The examples in the rest of this section will use sp_who and sp_lock . The output from these commands can be easily translated to what you would see in EM.

To identify whether a process is being blocked, you can examine the blk column in the output from sp_who :

 exec sp_who  go spid ecid   status       loginame hostname     blk dbname      cmd ---- ------ ------------ -------- -----------  --- ------      ----------------    1      0 sleeping     sa                    0   NULL        LOG WRITER    2      0 background   sa                    0   NULL        LOCK MONITOR    3      0 background   sa                    0   NULL        LAZY WRITER    4      0 background   sa                    0   NULL        SIGNAL HANDLER    5      0 background   sa                    0   NULL        TASK MANAGER    6      0 background   sa                    0   NULL        TASK MANAGER    7      0 sleeping     sa                    0   NULL        CHECKPOINT SLEEP    8      0 background   sa                    0   NULL        TASK MANAGER    9      0 background   sa                    0   NULL        TASK MANAGER   10      0 background   sa                    0   NULL        TASK MANAGER   11      0 background   sa                    0   NULL        TASK MANAGER   12      0 background   sa                    0   NULL        TASK MANAGER   13      0 background   sa                    0   NULL        TASK MANAGER   52      0 sleeping     sa       RRANKINSA20P 0   bigpubs2000 AWAITING COMMAND   55      0 sleeping     sa       RRANKINSA20P 52  bigpubs2000 SELECT 

If the value in the blk column is 0, then no blocking is occurring for that session. If the value is anything non-zero , the session is being blocked and the number in the blk column is the spid of the process that is causing the blocking. In the previous example, you can see process 52 blocking process 55.

To determine what table, page, or rows are involved, and at what level the blocking is occurring, you can use the sp_lock stored procedure:

 exec sp_lock  go spid   dbid   ObjId       IndId  Type Resource         Mode     Status ------ ------ ----------- ------ ---- ---------------- -------- ------     51      4           0      0 DB                    S        GRANT     52      8           0      0 DB                    S        GRANT     52      8  1685581043      0 TAB                   IX       GRANT     52      8  1685581043      1 PAG  1:5798           IX       GRANT     52      8  1685581043      1 KEY  (37005ad7376d)   X        GRANT     53      1    85575343      0 TAB                   IS       GRANT     53      8           0      0 DB                    S        GRANT     55      8           0      0 DB                    S        GRANT     55      8  1685581043      1 PAG  1:5798           IS       GRANT     55      8  1685581043      0 TAB                   IS       GRANT     55      8  1685581043      1 KEY  (37005ad7376d)   S        WAIT 

From this output, you can see that process 55 is waiting for a Shared (S) lock on the key for the object whose ID is 1685581043 and whose index ID is 1 (indicating that this is a data or index row in a clustered index). Process 52 has an Exclusive (X) lock granted on the same key resource (Resource = (37005ad7376d)). To identify the name of the table, you can use the object_name() function, running it in the database in which the object resides:

 select db_name(8)  go ---------------------------------- bigpubs2000 use bigpubs2000 go select object_name(1685581043) go ---------------------------------- stores 

When the IndId in the sp_lock output is 1 and the Type is KEY , it is not clear whether the lock is on a nonleaf index row or a data row. You can determine this by examining the page header for the corresponding page using the DBCC PAGE command and passing it the dbid, the file ID, and the page number. (For more information on using DBCC PAGE , see Chapter 33.)

 dbcc traceon(3604)  dbcc page (8, 1, 5798) go DBCC execution completed. If DBCC printed error messages, contact your system  administrator. PAGE: (1:5798) -------------- BUFFER: ------- BUF @0x18FA6640 --------------- bpage = 0x20672000        bhash = 0x00000000        bpageno = (1:5798) bdbid = 8                 breferences = 85          bstat = 0xb bspin = 0                 bnext = 0x00000000 PAGE HEADER: ------------ Page @0x20672000 ---------------- m_pageId = (1:5798)       m_headerVersion = 1       m_type = 1 m_typeFlagBits = 0x0      m_level = 0               m_flagBits = 0x0 m_objId = 1685581043      m_indexId = 0             m_prevPage = (0:0) m_nextPage = (1:5797)     pminlen = 15              m_slotCnt = 20 m_freeCnt = 6769          m_freeData = 1383         m_reservedCnt = 0 m_lsn = (555:1135:3)      m_xactReserved = 0        m_xdesId = (0:0) m_ghostRecCnt = 0         m_tornBits = 0 Allocation Status ----------------- GAM (1:2) = ALLOCATED     SGAM (1:3) = NOT ALLOCATED PFS (1:1) = 0x40 ALLOCATED   0_PCT_FULL             DIFF (1:6) = CHANGED ML (1:7) = NOT MIN_LOGGED DBCC execution completed. If DBCC printed error messages, contact your system  administrator. 

If you look at the value for m_indexId , you can determine whether the lock is on an index page or a data page. If m_indexId is 0, then it is a data page. If m_indexId is 1, then the lock is on a nonleaf clustered index page.

Finally, you might also want to know which commands were last executed by the sessions involved in the locking contention. This can be determined by using the DBCC INPUTBUFFER command and passing it the spid for each process involved:

 dbcc traceon(3604)  dbcc inputbuffer (52) go EventType      Parameters EventInfo -------------- ---------- ----------------------------------------------------- Language Event          0 begin tran INSERT INTO stores(stor_id, stor_name, stor_address, city, state, zip) VALUES('7200', 'my store', 'noplace', 'nowhere', 'NW', '00000') dbcc traceon(3604) dbcc inputbuffer (55) go EventType      Parameters EventInfo -------------- ---------- ----------------------------------------------- Language Event          0 select * from stores where stor_id = '7200' 

Setting the Lock Timeout Interval

If you do not want a process to wait indefinitely for a lock to become available, SQL Server allows you to set a lock timeout interval using the SET LOCK_TIMEOUT command. The timeout interval is specified in milliseconds. For example, if you want your processes to wait only 5 seconds (5,000 milliseconds ) for a lock to become available, execute the following command in the session:

 SET LOCKTIMEOUT 5000 

If your process requests a lock resource that cannot be granted within 5 seconds, the statement will be aborted with the following error message:

 Server: Msg 1222, Level 16, State 54, Line 1  Lock request time out period exceeded. 

To examine the current LOCK_TIMEOUT setting, you can query the system function @@LOCK_TIMEOUT :

 select @@lock_timeout  go -----------        5000 

If you want processes to abort immediately if the lock cannot be granted (in other words, no waiting at all), set the timeout interval to . If you want to set the timeout interval back to infinity, execute the SET_LOCK_TIMEOUT command and specify a timeout interval of -1 .

Minimizing Locking Contention

Although setting the lock timeout prevents a process from waiting indefinitely for a lock request to be granted, it doesn't address the cause of the locking contention. In an effort to maximize concurrency and application performance, you will want to minimize locking contention between processes as much as possible. Some general guidelines to follow to minimize locking contention include the following:

  • Keep transactions as short and concise as possible. The shorter the period of time that locks are held, the less chance for lock contention. Keep commands that are not essential to the unit of work being managed by the transaction outside the transaction (such as assignment selects, retrieval of updated or inserted rows, and so on).

  • Keep statements that comprise a transaction in a single batch to eliminate unnecessary delays caused by network I/O between the initial BEGIN TRAN statement and the subsequent COMMIT TRAN commands.

  • Consider coding transactions entirely within stored procedures. Stored procedures typically run faster than commands executed from a batch. In addition, because they are server resident, stored procedures reduce the amount of network I/O that occurs during execution of the transaction, resulting in faster completion of the transaction.

  • Commit updates in cursors frequently and as soon as possible. Cursor processing is much slower than set-oriented processing and will cause locks to be held longer.

NOTE

Even though cursors might run more slowly than set-oriented processing, cursors can sometimes be used to minimize locking contention for unqualified updates and deletes of a large number or rows from a table, which might result in a table lock being acquired. The update or delete might complete faster; however, it is running with an exclusive lock on the table, and no other process can access the table until it completes. By using a cursor to update a large number of rows one row at a time and committing the changes frequently, the cursor will use page or row-level locks rather than a table-level lock. It might take longer for the cursor to complete the actual update or delete, but while the cursor is running, other processes will still be able to access other rows or pages in the table that the cursor doesn't currently have locked. For more information on using cursors, see Chapter 26, "Using Transact -SQL in SQL Server 2000."

  • Use the lowest level of locking isolation required by each process. For example, if dirty reads are acceptable and accurate results are not imperative, consider using transaction isolation level 0. Use level 3, or HOLDLOCK, only if absolutely necessary.

  • Consider breaking one large table into multiple tables using a logical horizontal or vertical partitioning scheme. This minimizes the chances for table-level locks being acquired and increases concurrency by allowing multiple users to go against multiple tables rather than contending for access to a single table. (Table partitioning is covered in more detail in Chapter 21, "Administering Very Large SQL Server Databases.")

  • Never allow user interaction between a begin tran and a commit tran because doing so will cause locks to be held for an indefinite period of time. If a process needs to return rows for user interaction and then update one or more rows, consider using optimistic locking in your application. (Optimistic locking is covered in the "Optimistic Locking" section later in this chapter.)

  • Minimize "hot spots" in a table. Hot spots occur when the majority of the update activity on a table occurs within a small number of pages. For example, hot spots occur for concurrent inserts to the last page of a heap table or the last pages of a table with a clustered index on a sequential key. Hot spots can often be eliminated by creating a clustered index on a table on a column or columns that would order the rows in the table in such a way that insert and update activity is spread out more evenly across the pages in the table.

Deadlocks

A deadlock is a scenario that occurs when two processes are waiting for a locked resource that the other process currently holds. Neither process can move forward until it receives the requested lock on the resource, and neither process can release the lock it currently is holding until it can receive the requested lock. Essentially, neither process can move forward until the other one completes, and neither one can complete until it can move forward.

Two primary types of deadlocks can occur in SQL Server: cycle deadlocks and conversion deadlocks. A cycle deadlock occurs when two processes acquire locks on different resources, and then need to acquire a lock on the resource that the other process has. Figure 38.12 demonstrates an example of a cycle deadlock.

Figure 38.12. Example of a cycle deadlock.

graphics/38fig12.gif

In Figure 38.12, Process 1 acquires an exclusive lock on page 1:201 in a transaction. At the same time, Process 2 acquires an exclusive lock on page 1:301 in a transaction. Process 1 then attempts to acquire a lock on page 1:301 and begins waiting for the lock to become available. Simultaneously, Process 2 requests an exclusive lock on page 1:201 and a deadlock, or " deadly embrace" occurs.

A conversion deadlock occurs when two or more processes each hold a shared lock on the same resource within a transaction and each wants to promote the shared lock to an exclusive lock, but neither can do so until the other releases the shared lock. An example of a conversion deadlock is shown in Figure 38.13.

Figure 38.13. Example of a conversion deadlock.

graphics/38fig13.gif

SQL Server automatically detects when a deadlock situation occurs. A separate process in SQL Server, called the LOCK_MONITOR, checks the system for deadlocks roughly every 5 seconds. In the first pass, this process detects all the processes that are waiting on a lock resource. The LOCK_MONITOR thread checks for deadlocks by examining the list of waiting lock requests to see if any circular lock requests exist between the processes that are holding locks and the processes that are waiting for locks. When the LOCK_MONITOR detects a deadlock, SQL Server aborts the transaction of one of the involved processes.

How does SQL Server determine which process to abort? It attempts to choose as the deadlock victim the process that has accumulated the least amount of CPU time since the start of its session. In some cases, certain operations are marked as unkillable and cannot be chosen as the deadlock victim. One such example is a process that involves rolling back a transaction. This process cannot be chosen as a deadlock victim because the changes being rolled back could be left in an indeterminate state, which could lead to data corruption.

You can influence which process will be the deadlock victim by using the SET DEADLOCK_PRIORITY statement. If you have lower priority processes that would prefer to be chosen as the deadlock victims, you can set the process's deadlock priority to LOW . When this process is detected in a deadlock situation, it will automatically be chosen as the deadlock victim if the other process's deadlock priority is NORMAL . Currently, SQL Server does not have an option to set the deadlock priority to HIGH to specify processes that should always come out as the winner in a deadlock scenario.

It is often assumed that deadlocks happen at the data page or data row level. In fact, deadlocks often occur at the index page level. Figure 38.14 depicts a scenario in which a deadlock occurs due to contention at the index page level.

Figure 38.14. Deadlocks due to locks on index pages.

graphics/38fig14.gif

Avoiding Deadlocks

Although SQL Server automatically detects and handles deadlocks, you will want to try to avoid deadlocks in your applications. When a process is chosen as a deadlock victim, it has to resubmit its work again because it has been rolled back. Frequent deadlocks create performance problems if you have to keep repeating work.

You can follow a number of guidelines to minimize, if not completely eliminate, the number of deadlocks that occur in your application(s). Following the guidelines presented earlier to minimize locking contention and speed up your transactions will also help to eliminate deadlocks. The less time for which a transaction is holding locks, the less likely the transition will be around long enough for a conflicting lock request to be requested at the same time. In addition, you might want to follow this list of additional guidelines when designing your application:

  • Be consistent about the order in which you access the data from tables to avoid cycle deadlocks.

  • Minimize the use of HOLDLOCK or queries that are running using repeatable reads or serializable lock isolation levels. This helps avoid conversion deadlocks. If possible, perform UPDATE s before SELECT s so that your transaction acquires an update or exclusive lock first. This eliminates the chance of a conversion deadlock. (Later in the "Table Hints for Locking" section in this chapter, you will see how to use table-locking hints to force SELECT statements to use update or exclusive locks as another strategy to avoid conversion deadlocks.)

  • Choose the transaction isolation level judiciously. You might be able to reduce deadlocks by choosing lower isolation levels.

Handling and Examining Deadlocks

SQL Server returns an error number 1205 to the client when it aborts a transaction as a result of deadlock. Because a deadlock is not a logical error, but merely a resource contention issue, the client can resubmit the entire transaction. To handle deadlocks in your applications, be sure to trap for message 1205 in your error handler. When a 1205 error occurs, the application can simply resubmit the transaction automatically. It is considered bad form to allow end users of an application to see the deadlock error message returned from SQL Server.

Earlier in this chapter, you learned how to use sp_lock and sp_who to monitor locking contention between processes. However, when a deadlock occurs, one transaction is rolled back and one is allowed to continue. If you were to examine the output from sp_lock and sp_who after a deadlock occurs, the information likely would not be useful because the locks on the resources involved have since been released.

Fortunately, SQL Server provides a couple of trace flags to monitor deadlocks within SQL Server. Use the DBCC TRACEON command to turn on the trace flags and DBCC_TRACEOFF to turn them off. To have SQL Server write the output from the deadlock trace flags to the error log for further analysis, first execute the DBCC TRACEON(3605) command. The following is an example of setting the 1204 trace flag:

 dbcc traceon(3605)  dbcc traceon(1204) 

Optionally, you can also set the trace flags on whenever SQL Server is started up by adding the “T option with the appropriate trace flag value to the SQL Server startup parameters. For example, to have SQL Server turn on the 1204 trace flag automatically on startup, bring up the Server Properties dialog box in Enterprise Manager. On the General tab, click the Startup Parameters button. This brings up the dialog box shown in Figure 38.15. Type “T1204 in the Parameter box, click Add, and then click OK to save the changes. Do the same to add the 3605 trace flag option as well, or no output from the 1204 trace flag will be sent to the errorlog.

Figure 38.15. Setting the 1204 trace flag to be enabled on SQL Server startup.

graphics/38fig15.jpg

CAUTION

The 1204, 1205, and 1200 trace flags do incur some additional processing overhead in SQL Server. They should be used only when debugging and tuning SQL Server performance, and should not be left on indefinitely in a production environment. Turn them off after you have diagnosed and fixed the problems.

The 1204 Trace Flag

Trace flag 1204 prints useful information to the SQL Server error log when a deadlock is detected. Listing 38.2 presents a sample of the output from the error log for this trace flag.

Listing 38.2 Sample Output for the 1204 Trace Flag When a Deadlock Occurs
 Deadlock encountered .... Printing deadlock information 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2     Wait-for graph 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2     Node:1 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2     PAG: 8:1:5798                 CleanCnt:2 Mode:  S Flags: 0x2 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2      Grant List:: 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2        Owner:0x2c3cabe0 Mode: S        Flg:0x0  Ref:0 Life:02000000 SPID:55 ECID:0 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2       SPID: 55 ECID: 0 Statement Type: DELETE Line  #: 1 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2        Input Buf: Language Event: delete from  stores where stor_id = '7200' 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2      Requested By: 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2        ResType:LockOwner Stype:'OR' Mode: IX SPID:  52 ECID:0 Ec:(0x193a7500) Value:0x2c3cabc0 Cost:(0/0) 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2     Node:2 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2     PAG: 8:1:5798                 CleanCnt:2 Mode:  S Flags: 0x2 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2      Grant List:: 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2        Owner:0x2b1b9c00 Mode: S        Flg:0x0  Ref:0 Life:02000000 SPID:52 ECID:0 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2       SPID: 52 ECID: 0 Statement Type: DELETE Line  #: 1 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2        Input Buf: Language Event: delete from  stores where stor_id = '7200' 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2      Requested By: 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2        ResType:LockOwner Stype:'OR' Mode: IX SPID:  55 ECID:0 Ec:(0x2ac59500) Value:0x265083e0 Cost:(0/0) 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2     Victim Resource Owner: 2001-08-27 05:35:01.40 spid2      ResType:LockOwner Stype:'OR' Mode: IX SPID:  55 ECID:0 Ec:(0x2ac59500) Value:0x265083e0 Cost:(0/0) 

Although the 1204 output is somewhat cryptic, it is not too difficult to read. If you look through the output, you can see where it lists the SPID s of the processes involved in the deadlock, the type of statement involved ( Statement Type ) and the actual text of the query ( Input Buf ) that each process was executing at the time the deadlock occurred. The output also displays the locks granted to each process ( Grant List ), as well as the lock resources requested by the deadlock victim. The output might also display the page information ( PAG ) on the pages involved. In this case, the output is showing that the deadlock occurred in database ID (8), the file ID (1), and the actual page ID (5798).

The 1205 Trace Flag

The 1205 trace flag provides further insight into the LOCK_MONITOR process and how it searches for deadlock situations and displays the information when the deadlock is encountered. Notice how the deadlock search is performed every 5 seconds and only blocking locks are detected until the actual deadlock is encountered. At this point, no blocking locks remain . An example of the output generated by the 1205 trace flag is shown in Listing 38.3.

Listing 38.3 Sample Output for the 1205 Trace Flag
 2001-08-27 05:20:46.40 spid2     ---------------------------------- 2001-08-27 05:20:46.40 spid2     Starting deadlock search 2682 2001-08-27 05:20:46.40 spid2     Target Resource Owner: 2001-08-27 05:20:46.40 spid2      ResType:LockOwner Stype:'OR' Mode: IX SPID:52  ECID:0 Ec:(0x193a7500) Value:0x2c3cabe0 2001-08-27 05:20:46.40 spid2      Node:1  ResType:LockOwner Stype:'OR' Mode:  IX SPID:52 ECID:0 Ec:(0x193a7500) Value:0x2c3cabe0 2001-08-27 05:20:46.40 spid2 2001-08-27 05:20:46.40 spid2     End deadlock search 2682 ... a deadlock was  not found. 2001-08-27 05:20:46.40 spid2     ---------------------------------- 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2     ---------------------------------- 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2     Starting deadlock search 2683 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2     Target Resource Owner: 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2      ResType:LockOwner Stype:'OR' Mode: IX SPID:52  ECID:0 Ec:(0x193a7500) Value:0x2c3cabe0 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2      Node:1  ResType:LockOwner Stype:'OR' Mode:  IX SPID:52 ECID:0 Ec:(0x193a7500) Value:0x2c3cabe0 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2      Node:2  ResType:LockOwner Stype:'OR' Mode:  IX SPID:55 ECID:0 Ec:(0x2ac59500) Value:0x265083a0 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2      Cycle:  ResType:LockOwner Stype:'OR' Mode:  IX SPID:52 ECID:0 Ec:(0x193a7500) Value:0x2c3cabe0 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2     Deadlock cycle was encountered .... verifying  cycle 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2      Node:1  ResType:LockOwner Stype:'OR' Mode:  IX SPID:52 ECID:0 Ec:(0x193a7500) Value:0x2c3cabe0 Cost:(0/0) 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2      Node:2  ResType:LockOwner Stype:'OR' Mode:  IX SPID:55 ECID:0 Ec:(0x2ac59500) Value:0x265083a0 Cost:(0/0) 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2      Cycle:  ResType:LockOwner Stype:'OR' Mode:  IX SPID:52 ECID:0 Ec:(0x193a7500) Value:0x2c3cabe0 Cost:(0/0) 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2     End deadlock search 2683...a deadlock was found 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2     ---------------------------------- 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2     ---------------------------------- 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2     Starting deadlock search 2684 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2     Target Resource Owner: 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2      ResType:LockOwner Stype:'OR' Mode: IX SPID:55 ECID:0 Ec:(0x2ac59500) Value:0x265083a0 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2      Node:1  ResType:LockOwner Stype:'OR' Mode:  IX SPID:55 ECID:0 Ec:(0x2ac59500) Value:0x265083a0 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2      Node:2  ResType:LockOwner Stype:'OR' Mode:  IX SPID:52 ECID:0 Ec:(0x193a7500) Value:0x2c3cabe0 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2     Previous victim encountered ... aborting search 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2     End deadlock search 2684 ... a deadlock was not  found. 2001-08-27 05:20:51.40 spid2     ---------------------------------- 

This information could be useful to monitor the frequency and duration of blocking locks between processes to help identify the culprits of locking contention. Again, be careful using this trace flag because it can generate copious amounts of output in a system where substantial activity and locking contention is occurring.

Trace Flag 1200

Trace flag 1200 prints all of the lock request/release information back to the client program as it occurs in SQL Server. This information is displayed regardless of whether a deadlock is involved. This trace flag can be expensive in terms of system performance overhead, but it can be useful for analysis to display the acquisition, escalation, and release of locks within your SQL commands.

If you enable trace flag 1200 from a user session, it only applies to the current session unless you specify the optional parameter of -1 to the DBCC TRACEON command to enable the trace setting for all user sessions:

 DBCC TRACEON(1200, -1) 

Also, when enabled in this manner, the output comes back only to the client and not to the errorlog. Capturing and analyzing this information for multiple client connections would be difficult.

NOTE

It is possible to capture this information to the errorlog for all user sessions by setting the 1200 and 3605 trace flags as startup parameters for SQL Server, as shown in Figure 38.16. However, because the 1200 trace flag will be capturing lock information for all processes, including internal system processes, the amount of output generated to the error log by this trace flag can be considerable. I do not recommend capturing the 1200 trace information in this manner on a high volume system, or even a medium volume system. The errorlog can grow to many megabytes in size very quickly.

Figure 38.16. Setting the 1200 and 3605 trace flags to be enabled on SQL Server startup.

graphics/38fig16.jpg

The following code displays a sample of the output from the 1200 trace flag:

 DBCC TRACEON (1200)  go begin tran --select count (state) from stores holdlock delete from stores where stor_id = '7200' go Process 52 acquiring IX lock on TAB: 8:1685581043 [] (class bit2000000 ref1)  result: OK Process 52 acquiring IS lock on TAB: 8:1957582012 [] (class bit0 ref1) result:  OK Process 52 acquiring IX lock on PAG: 8:1:5798 (class bit2000000 ref1) result:  OK Process 52 acquiring Range-X-X lock on KEY: 8:1685581043:1 (3700f04c0158)  (class bit2000000 ref1) result: OK Process 52 releasing lock on TAB: 8:1957582012 []go 

TIP

You can also monitor deadlocks and lock escalation with SQL Profiler, which was discussed in the "Monitoring Lock Activity in SQL Server" section earlier in this chapter. SQL Profiler provides two deadlock events that can be monitored . Under the Locks event list, you can choose to display a simple message that indicates when a deadlock occurs between two processes, as well as the complete deadlock chain. (This information is similar to that provided by the 1205 trace flag.)

Lock acquisition, escalation, and the release of locks is also more easily monitored using SQL Profiler than using trace flag 1200. This is because you can filter the lock information that SQL Server captures to specific processes, and the information captured can easily be saved to a file or a database table for further analysis.

For more information on using SQL Profiler to monitor SQL Server activity, see the "Monitoring Lock Activity in SQL Server" section earlier in this chapter, as well as Chapter 7.



Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Unleashed
Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Unleashed (2nd Edition)
ISBN: 0672324679
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2002
Pages: 503

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