WHAT PEOPLE BUY: BASKETS, BOXES, VASES, POTS, AND DECORATIVE HOLDERS


Just over 40 percent of consumers (42 percent) in 2003 purchased baskets, boxes, vases, pots, and other decorative holders. With the definition of this category expanded from the last survey, the whole range of functional storage accessories are becoming more important in home décor, offering both decorative values as well as the functional benefit of holding flowers, plants, or other items.

Industry Snapshot

Baskets, boxes, vases, and pots are part of the $16.2 billion home decorative segment of the giftware market. Total sales of decorative boxes and tins were $1.1 billion in 2002, up 26 percent over retail sales in 2000 (see Figure 8.5). Vases, urns, and pots represent about $650 million in retail sales, while the retail sales of decorative baskets are in the range of $2.3 billion. Total retail sales of the category reached $4 billion in 2002.

 

2000

2002

% CHG '00-'02

Total Personal Consumption in millions

$1,834.3

$4,040.3

 

Baskets

n.a.

2,289.0

 

Boxes and tins

875.8

1,102.7

25.9

Vases, pots, and urns

958.5

648.6

-32.3

Source: Unity Marketing


Figure 8.5: Baskets, Boxes, Vases, Pots Industry Snapshot

Retail Overview

When shoppers go looking for decorative household storage, including vases and pots, they turn first to discount department stores. Traditional department stores are the second most popular alternative, followed closely by other specialty stores, including gift stores, florists, office supply stores, and others.

As demand for innovative and decorative household storage solutions grows, specialty retailers are targeting this need. Williams-Sonoma has a chain of 12 Hold Everything stores along with a catalog by the same name. Another chain called Organized Living operates about 25 stores nationwide. Longaberger Baskets makes handcrafted wooden baskets their specialty, which are sold only through home parties and sales consultants.

The nation's home furnishings specialty chains, such as Linens 'n Things, Bed Bath & Beyond, Pier 1, Pottery Barn, Crate & Barrel, and Kirklands, are also getting into this area in response to consumer's demand for help in eliminating clutter and getting organized.

Purchase Drivers

The most significant trend impacting the home today is the end of cocooning. The same home that two years ago looked cozy and comfortable with every nook and cranny filled, today looks cluttered and disorganized. To the rescue come legions of baskets, boxes, and other storage solutions that help the homeowner eliminate the mess. It is getting harder and harder to persuade shoppers to invite purely decorative objects into the home. That only makes for more clutter. Today consumers have a new and growing demand for storage boxes and baskets that can be put to use for organizing household clutter. Though baskets and tins serve a practical function, they are decorative as well. While shoppers today wouldn't think of buying a purely decorative figurine, they are perfectly willing to buy a decorative vase to display on the shelf, as long as it is used with a real floral bouquet.

Demographic Variables

Women take the lead in buying baskets, boxes, vases, and other decorative storage items. In terms of age, no spikes appear that would mark a prime age-group target for this category. Rather, consumers up through age 65 have about the same purchase incidence for baskets and boxes. People living in metropolitan areas are more active buying these items than rural folk, but with space tight in city apartments this finding isn't surprising.

The higher-income houses, especially those making $75,000 or more, have the highest reported purchase incidence of this category. Household size also relates to purchase incidence, as two- and three-person households are far more active buyers than are single-person households.

Key Demographics of Buyers of Baskets, Boxes, Vases, Urns, and Pots.

  • Women take the lead in buying.

  • The highest-income households buy more.

  • No specific age is prime.

  • Larger households are bigger consumers.




Why People Buy Things They Don't Need. Understanding and Predicting Consumer Behavior
Why People Buy Things They Dont Need: Understanding and Predicting Consumer Behavior
ISBN: 0793186021
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2003
Pages: 137

Similar book on Amazon

flylib.com © 2008-2017.
If you may any questions please contact us: flylib@qtcs.net