5.9. Exporting Directories with NFS

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You can use the /etc/exports file to store folders that you want to export over NFS. For example, the following line exports the /Users directory to two hosts (192.168.0.134 and 192.168.0.106):

     /Users  -ro 192.168.0.134 192.168.0.106 

The NFS server will start automatically at boot time if there are any exports in that file. After you've set up your exports, you can reboot, and NFS should start automatically. NFS options supported by Mac OS X include the following (see the exports(5) manpage for complete details):


-maproot=user

Specifies that the remote root user should be mapped to the specified user. You may specify either a username or numeric user ID.


-maproot=user:[group[:group...]]

Specifies that the remote root user should be mapped to the specified user with the specified group credentials. If you include the colon with no groups, as in -maproot=username:, it means the remote user should have no group credentials. You may specify a username or numeric user ID for user and a group name or numeric group ID for group.


-mapall=user

Specifies that all remote users should be mapped to the specified user.


-mapall=user:[group[:group...]]

Specifies that all remote users should be mapped to the specified user with the specified group credentials. If you include the colon with no groups, as in mapall=username:, it specifies that the remote user should be given no group credentials.


-kerb

Uses a Kerberos authentication server to authenticate and map client credentials.


-ro

Exports the filesystem as read-only. The synonym -o is also supported.

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    Mac OS X Tiger for Unix Geeks
    Mac OS X Tiger for Unix Geeks
    ISBN: 0596009127
    EAN: 2147483647
    Year: 2006
    Pages: 176

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