SSL Termination


With SSL termination, a dedicated SSL termination device terminates the SSL connection, offloading CPU-intensive SSL computations from your origin servers. SSL termination devices have special hardware that can perform the SSL operations.

SSL termination also enables the content switch to parse cleartext application headers to intelligently load balance SSL requests. To provide SSL offloading, you can configure your content switch and SSL termination device to decrypt SSL traffic and forward the cleartext traffic to non-SSL real servers, as Figure 11-1 illustrates.

Figure 11-1. SSL Offloading


Because the content switch sees the request in cleartext, you can configure Layers 57 load balancing with SSL termination. Also, because the SSL module forwards traffic in cleartext to real servers, you should make sure that you secure your server farm switches to prevent sniffing of the cleartext traffic.

Note

To encrypt traffic from your SSL termination device to your back-end real servers, you can configure Back-End Encryption on your Content Services Switch (CSS) and CSM. Refer to your product documentation on Cisco.com for more information on Back-End Encryption.


Based on Figure 11-1, a client's SSL transaction flows through the content network as follows:

  1. The client generates a TCP SYN segment to initiate a TCP connection to the SSL port (443) on the content switch. The content switch receives the TCP segment, issues an HTTPS virtual server lookup, and opens the TCP connection with the client. The client generates a cleartext SSL Client Hello packet and forwards it to the content switch.

    Note

    Refer to Figure 8-11 in Chapter 8 for more information on the SSL four-way handshake.


  2. The content switch receives the SSL Client Hello and load balances the request to an available SSL termination device. If you configure SSL-sticky on the content switch, the content switch stores the Session ID associated with the connection. The SSL termination device then processes the Client Hello and completes the SSL four-way handshake with the client to establish an encrypted transport session.

    Note

    If you have multiple SSL devices, you should configure SSL-sticky to ensure that each connection from within the SSL session is load-balanced to the same SSL device. This would be beneficial for clients who want to resume idle SSL sessions, as you learned previously from Figure 8-12 in Chapter 8.


  3. The client generates an HTTPS application request and forwards it to the content switch over the encrypted SSL transport session. The content switch in turn forwards the encrypted request to the appropriate SSL termination device, based on the entry for the existing TCP connection in the content switch's connection table.

  4. The SSL termination device receives the encrypted application request.

  5. The SSL termination device decrypts the application request, optionally rewrites the URL or any HTTP headers in the request, and forwards it back to the content switch.

    Note

    You will learn about URL and HTTP Header rewriting later in this Chapter.


  6. The content switch receives the cleartext application request, issues an HTTP virtual server lookup, stores any cleartext sticky information (for example, HTTP cookies and source IP addresses) that you configure, and load balances the request to an available real server. The content switch also performs destination Network Address Translation (NAT) on the packet to the real server IP address.

  7. The real server processes the cleartext request and sends the HTTP 200 OK cleartext response to the content switch.

  8. The content switch receives the HTTP 200 OK cleartext response and forwards it to the SSL termination device, based on the connection information in the content switch's connection table, thus overriding normal TCP/IP routing to the client source IP address. The content switch also reverses the destination NAT performed in Step 6.

  9. The SSL termination device encrypts the response and forwards it to the content switch, again preserving the source and destination IP addresses.

  10. The content switch routes the encrypted SSL packet to the client.

To configure SSL Termination, you can use either:

  • CSS with an SSL Module Recall from Chapter 10 that you can install an SSL encryption module in the CSS 11503 or 11506 or obtain a CSS 11501 with an embedded SSL module.

  • CSM with SSL Daughter Card Module (CSM-S) You can also obtain a CSM-S for terminating SSL connections. The daughter card module is not field upgradeableyou cannot purchase the daughter card separately for an existing CSM installation.

Configuring Your CSS for SSL Termination

To configure your CSS to offload your SSL connections to an SSL termination device, you must first load your keys and certificates to the SSL termination device. If you are already using public-key infrastructure (PKI) on your real servers and want to upgrade your system with SSL termination, you can import your existing private keys and server certificates to the SSL termination device. Otherwise, you can generate private/public key pairs and Certificate Signing Requests on the SSL termination device and request a server certificate from a Certificate Authority (CA). Once you enroll with a CA and receive the server certificate, you can import the server certificate to your SSL termination device.

Note

You can also use your own private CA to enroll certificates with Cisco CSSs and CSMs. For more information on configuring automatic certificate enrollment with private CAs, see your product documentation on Cisco.com.


Creating and Importing Keys and Certificates on the CSS

You learned about the SSL module that is available for the CSS in Chapter 10. To import pre-existing keys and certificates to your CSS SSL module, you can use the command:

 copy ssl [protocol] ftp_record [import filename [format] "password" {"passphrase"} 


The passphrase is the existing phrase created with the certificate for encrypting/decrypting. This phrase must be used anywhere you use the certificate, not just on the CSS. You must also create a new password as a second layer of security that the CSS will use to encrypt the imported certificate. This password is local to the CSS and prevents unauthorized administrators from accessing the certificate on the CSS. Before issuing this command, you should first create an FTP record where your certificate and private key is located. You can use the ftp-record command to create a record called import-ssl. You must include your FTP username, your password to the FTP server, and the home directory where the certificate and private key is located on the server. For example:

 ftp-record import-ssl 10.1.1.1 cisco "cisco123" /home/sdaros 


You can use the following copy ssl command to import a PEM file containing an existing server certificate and private key, called sitecert.pem and sitekey.pem, respectively:

 copy ssl sftp import-ssl import sitecert.pem PEM "sanfran" "sanfran" copy ssl sftp import-ssl import sitekey.pem PEM "sanfran" "sanfran" 


You must indicate to the CSS whether the imported files contain a private key or a certificate by using the ssl associate commands:

 ssl associate cert mycontentcert sitecert.pem ssl associate rsakey mycontentkey sitekey.pem 


Note

Make sure that you import your CA's root certificate. Additionally, if your CA issues you a chained certificate, make sure you also import any intermediary certificates within the chain.


Instead of importing existing keys, you can generate an Rivest, Shamir, and Adelman (RSA) public/private key pair for asymmetric encryption on the CSS using the following command:

 ssl genrsa filename numbits "password" 


This command stores both the private and public key in a single file that you must associate with a certificate name. For example, to generate a key called mycontentkey, use the following commands:

 ssl genrsa mycontentkeyfile 1024 "sanfran" ssl associate rsakey mycontentkey mycontentkeyfile 


To generate a CSR for the key pair, use the following command in Example 11-1.

Example 11-1. Generating a CSR on the CSS

 (config)# ssl gencsr mycontentkey You are about to be asked to enter information that will be incorporated into your certificate request. What you are about to enter is what is called a Distinguished Name or a DN. For some fields there will be a default value, If you enter '.', the field will be left blank. Country Name (2 letter code) [US]US State or Province (full name) [SomeState]California Locality Name (city) [SomeCity]San Jose Organization Name (company name) [Acme Inc]Cisco Systems, Inc. Organizational Unit Name (section) [Web Administration]Network Engineering Common Name (your domain name) [www.acme.com]www.cisco.com Email address [webadmin@acmeficom]admin@cisco.com -----BEGIN NEW CERTIFICATE REQUEST---- MIctCMtmZONOY+ybEHl/mX0RdqXFnivLBgNVBAYTAlVTMRAwDgYDVQQIEwdHZW9y DQ kW6Pa6mbjeUV1wffn2dtbKsmz7DnK2BVbml2ZXJzaXR5IG9 yRPs36ywGwDK3 aWExNTAzBgNVBAsTLFVuaXZlcnNpdHkgQ29tcHV0aW5nIGFuZCBOZXR3b3JraW5n IFNlcnZpY2VzMRYwFAYDVQQDEw13d3ctcy51Z2EuZWR1MIGdMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEB AQUAA4GLADCBhwKBgQDh3yRPs36ywGwDK3ZS3qaOoNraOFHkSNTsielHUMHxV1/G N1E43/bifEQJUvSw/nrkOQf3Ync8O/39lelUTJeP6QZkX9Hg1XtuSUov3ExzT53l vbctCMtmZONOY+ybEHl/mX0RdqXFnivLpXohr7dJ5A1qHfjww/SLW8J/7UXj1QIB A6AAMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBBAUAA4GBAIEu35zoGmODCcwwNrTqZk3JQAjyONJxjjtd uQ+QLQcckO4aghBpcqsgLckW6Pa6mbjeUV1wffn2dtbKsmz7DnK2fwnyaBtxXMvi CC4o9uvW11i5TjdorfOdRI1lR0FrNAzf+3GQUl1S2a83wagvFjo12yUCukrxBgyU bXbmNuJpkdsjdkjfkdjfkdfjdkfjdkfjdkfj -----END NEW CERTIFICATE REQUEST----- 

To apply for a server certificate, you must send the CSR to a CA of your choice. Most well-known CAs allow you to cut and paste your CSR to their websites and will issue you a server certificate via e-mail within a few business days. Once you receive your server certificate (called sitecert.pem in this example), you can import it using the copy ssl command that you learned previously:

 copy ssl sftp import-ssl import sitecert.pem PEM "sanfran" "sanfran" ssl associate cert mycontentcert sitecert.pem 


Note

Make sure you keep track of when your certificates expire. You will need to obtain new certificates before they expire. Otherwise, clients will receive an error when they attempt to download the expired certificate.


Terminating SSL on the CSS

Now that you have a server certificate and a private key on your CSS, you can configure your CSS to terminate SSL connections on behalf of your real servers, as illustrated in Example 11-2.

Note

Note that there is no IP addressing and server destination-Network Address Translationing (DNATing) involved when configuring the CSS SSL module.


Example 11-2. Configuring Your CSS to Terminate SSL Connections

 ssl-proxy-list ssl_proxy  ssl-server 1  ssl-server 1 vip address 10.1.10.1  ssl-server 1 port 443  ssl-server 1 rsacert mycontentcert  ssl-server 1 rsakey mycontentkey  ssl-server 1 cipher TLS_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_MD5 10.1.10.100 80 weight 5 ssl-server 1 cipher TLS_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA 10.1.10.100 80 weight 10  ssl-server 1 http-header session  ssl-server 1 urlrewrite 1 www.cisco.com  active service ssl-serv1  type ssl-accel  add ssl-proxy-list ssl_proxy  slot 5  keepalive type none  active service ssl-serv2  type ssl-accel  add ssl-proxy-list ssl_proxy  slot 6  keepalive type none  active service web01  ip address 10.1.10.10  active service web02  ip address 10.1.10.11  active owner cisco  content https-vip   vip address 10.1.10.100   protocol tcp   port 443   add service ssl-serv1   add service ssl-serv2   active content http-vip  vip address 10.1.10.100  protocol tcp  port 80  add service web01  add service web02  active 

Configuring URL and Header Rewrite on the CSS

You learned previously that, without back-end encryption, real servers receive cleartext requests and send HTML page responses in cleartext (in Steps 68 from Figure 11-1). However, if an HTML page includes embedded HTML references to other sites, you need to make sure that these links are prefixed by "https://" and not "http://"; otherwise, your browser may give you an error while accessing the secure site.

For example, your HTML page may include the following links:

<A HREF="http://cisco.com/support.html">Support</A>

<A HREF="http://cisco.com/services.html">Services</A>

<A HREF="http://cisco.com/products.html">Products</A>

To inform your HTTP server that the current cleartext request is from the CSS SSL module (in Step 6) and is not a client request, you can configure the CSS SSL module to add an HTTP header to the HTTP request. For example, you can add an HTTP header including the SSL session information. To enable the CSS to insert SSL session information HTTP headers into requests that it proxies, use the following proxy list mode command, as Example 11-2 illustrates:

 ssl-server number http-header session 


You can then configure your HTTP servers to recognize these headers and supply an HTML page containing "https://" within the embedded links instead of "http:// ."

Note

You can also configure the CSS to insert the client and server certificates as HTTP headers using the client-cert and server-cert keywords of the ssl-server http-header proxy list command.


Additionally, if your servers send HTTP 300 series redirects to your clients, then you should configure your CSS to rewrite the "http://" reference in the "Location:" header of HTTP 300 series redirect methods to "https://" with the proxy list command:

 ssl-server number urlrewrite number hostname [sslport port {clearport port}] 


This command enables you to specify particular URLs that you want to rewrite in HTTP 300 series redirects, by including the exact URL or by using wildcards. Entries without wildcards take precedence over wildcard entries, and prefix wildcards entries take precedence over suffix wildcard entries. For example, you can configure your CSS to rewrite all redirects for "*.cisco.com" (prefix wildcard) and "www.cisco.*" (suffix wildcard) with the commands:

 ssl-server 1 urlrewrite 1 *.cisco.com ssl-server 1 urlrewrite 1 www.cisco.* 


You can also rewrite nonstandard cleartext HTTP ports (that is, any port other than port 80) with either the standard SSL port (that is, port 443) or nonstandard SSL ports. For example, the following command will rewrite "http://www.cisco.com:81" to "https://www.cisco.com":

 ssl-server 1 urlrewrite 1 www.cisco.com clearport 81 


The following command rewrites "http://www.cisco.com" to "https://www.cisco.com:444":

 ssl-server 1 urlrewrite 1 www.cisco.com sslport 444 


The following command rewrites "http://www.cisco.com:81" to "https://www.cisco.com:444":

 ssl-server 1 urlrewrite 1 www.cisco.com sslport 444 clearport 81 


Note

Neither the CSM nor CSS supports rewriting HTTP URLs embedded directly within HTML pages.


Configuring Your Content Services Module with SSL

You can also configure your CSM-S for SSL termination. As with the CSS with an SSL module, you can import existing keys and server certificates to your CSM-S daughter card or generate new keys and request server certificates from a CA.

Note

You can also configure SSL termination with the CSM using a separate SSL services module (SSLM). The configuration for the SSLM is the same as the CSM-S. For more information on the SSLM, refer to its product documentation on Cisco.com.


Creating and Importing Keys and Certificates on the CSM

To generate a private/public key pair on your CSM-S daughter card, use the command:

 crypto key generate rsa general-keys label key-label [exportable] [modulus size] 


For example, the crypto key generate command produces the output in Example 11-3 to generate a key pair called mycontentkey on the CSM-S. If you want to be able to export the private key from the SSL daughter card for future use outside the CSM-S, you can use the exportable keyword.

Example 11-3. Configuring Your CSM to Generate an RSA Key Pair

 ssl-card(config)# crypto key generate rsa general-keys label mycontentkey exportable The name for the keys will be: mycontentkey Choose the size of the key modulus in the range of 360 to 2048 for your General Purpose Keys. Choosing a key modulus greater than 512 may take a few minutes. How many bits in the modulus [512]: Generating RSA keys.... [OK]. 

To enter your organization's information for a CSR, you must create a trust point, as Example 11-4 illustrates.

Example 11-4. Configuring a Trust Point on the CSM-S

 crypto ca trustpoint mycontent-trustpoint  rsakeypair mycontentkey  serial  subject-name C=US, ST=California, CN=www.cisco.com, OU=Network Engineering, O=Cisco Systems, Inc.  enrollment url tftp://10.1.1.1/certificates 

To generate a CSR for the key pair, use the command:

 crypto ca enroll trustpoint-name 


For example, Example 11-5 shows the command output to generate a request for the key pair mycontentkey that Example 11-3 previously generated.

Example 11-5. Creating a CSR on Your CSM-S

[View full width]

 ssl-card(config)# crypto ca enroll mycontent-trustpoint % Start certificate enrollment .. % The subject name in the certificate will be:CN=www.cisco.com, OU=Network Engineering,  O=Cisco Systems, Inc. % The fully-qualified domain name in the certificate will be:www.cisco.com % The subject name in the certificate will be:www.cisco.com % The serial number in the certificate will be:B0FFF22E % Include an IP address in the subject name? [no]:no Display Certificate Request to terminal? [yes/no]:yes Certificate Request follows: MIctCMtmZONOY+ybEHl/mX0RdqXFnivLBgNVBAYTAlVTMRAwDgYDVQQIEwdHZW9y DQ kW6Pa6mbjeUV1wffn2dtbKsmz7DnK2BVbml2ZXJzaXR5IG9 yRPs36ywGwDK3 aWExNTAzBgNVBAsTLFVuaXZlcnNpdHkgQ29tcHV0aW5nIGFuZCBOZXR3b3JraW5n IFNlcnZpY2VzMRYwFAYDVQQDEw13d3ctcy51Z2EuZWR1MIGdMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEB AQUAA4GLADCBhwKBgQDh3yRPs36ywGwDK3ZS3qaOoNraOFHkSNTsielHUMHxV1/G N1E43/bifEQJUvSw/nrkOQf3Ync8O/39lelUTJeP6QZkX9Hg1XtuSUov3ExzT53l vbctCMtmZONOY+ybEHl/mX0RdqXFnivLpXohr7dJ5A1qHfjww/SLW8J/7UXj1QIB A6AAMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBBAUAA4GBAIEu35zoGmODCcwwNrTqZk3JQAjyONJxjjtd uQ+QLQcckO4aghBpcqsgLckW6Pa6mbjeUV1wffn2dtbKsmz7DnK2fwnyaBtxXMvi CC4o9uvW11i5TjdorfOdRI1lR0FrNAzf+3GQUl1S2a83wagvFjo12yUCukrxBgyU bXbmNuJpkdsjdkjfkdjfkdfjdkfjdkfjdkfj ---End - This line not part of the certificate request--- Redisplay enrollment request? [yes/no]:no 

As you learned previously, to apply for a server certificate, you must send the CSR to a public CA of your choice (such as Verisign), or to your own private CA (such as Microsoft Certificate Services). If you use a public CA, once you receive the server certificate, you can TFTP it to the CSM-S using the crypto ca import command, as Example 11-6 illustrates. The CSM-S connects to the TFTP server specified previously in Example 11-4 using the enrollment url command. Make sure your certificate exists on a valid TFTP server before using the crypto ca import command.

Alternately, if you use a private CA, you can specify its URL with the enrollment url command, and the crypto ca import command will connect to the private CA to download the server certificate.

Example 11-6. Importing a Server Certificate on Your CSM-S

 ssl-card(config)# crypto ca import mycontent-trustpoint certificate % The fully-qualified domain name in the certificate will be: ssl-card.cisco.com Retrieve Certificate from tftp server? [yes/no]:yes % Request to retrieve Certificate queued ssl-proxy(config)# Loading mycontent-trustpointficrt from 10.1.1.1 (via Ethernet0/0.172):! [OK - 1608 bytes] ssl-proxy(config)# *Nov 25 21:52:36.299:%CRYPTO-6-CERTRET:Certificate received from Certificate Authority ssl-proxy(config)# ^Z 

Note

Make sure you load your CA's certificate (and intermediate certificate, if necessary) to the CSM-S using the crypto ca authenticate command. Also use the enrollment url command to make sure that the CA's certificate resides on the TFTP server you specify. If you are using your own private CA, the crypto ca authenticate command will load the CA certificate from the private CA.


Alternately, if you have existing private keys and certificates, you can import them into your SSL daughter card. For example, to import an existing PKCS#12 key, you need to have previously generated the PKCS#12 file using an external PKI system. Recall from Chapter 8 that a PKCS#12 file can contain a private key and server certificate chain.

Then, to import the existing private key and server certificate chain from the PKCS#12 file to your CSM-S, you can use the following command:

 crypto ca import trustpoint_label pkcs12 {scp: | ftp: | nvram: | rcp: | tftp:} [pkcs12_filename] pass_phrase 


Note

Using the crypt ca import command to import PKCS#12 certificates automatically generates the trust point configuration for use in your SSL proxy services. You will learn how to configure a proxy service on the SSL daughter card later in this section.


Terminating SSL on the CSM-S

Now that you have private keys and server certificates on your SSL daughter card, you can configure your CSM-S to terminate SSL connections. You can configure the content switch either in NAT-mode (that is, the content switch will destination-NAT the client's request to the SSL daughter card's IP address in Step 2 from Figure 11-1) or in dispatch mode (that is, the content switch will route the packet directly to the SSL daughter card without DNATing it). If you configure the content switch in NAT-mode, make sure you configure the SSL daughter card to DNAT the packet back to the virtual server IP address. Example 11-7 shows how to configure your CSM to terminate SSL connections in dispatch-mode, based on the network topology in Figure 11-2. For the example in this section, the SSL daughter card farm is in bridge-mode and the real server farm is in router-mode, as Figure 11-2 illustrates.

Figure 11-2. Dispatch-Mode CSM with SSL Daughter Card in Bridge-Mode


Example 11-7. Configuring Your CSM to Terminate SSL in Bridge-Mode

 interface vlan 10  description *** Client VLAN  ip address 10.1.10.2 interface fastethernet 2/1  description *** Web01  switchport vlan 30 interface fastethernet 2/2  description *** Web02  switchport vlan 30 ip route 10.1.30.0 255.255.255.0 10.1.10.1 ip route 10.1.99.0 255.255.255.0 10.1.10.1 module csm 5 vlan 10 client  ip address 10.1.10.1 255.255.255.0  gateway 10.1.10.2 vlan 20 server  ip address 10.1.10.1 255.255.255.0 vlan 30 server  ip address 10.1.30.1 255.255.255.0 vlan 99 server  ip address 10.1.99.1 255.255.255.0 serverfarm ssl-accel-farm  no nat server                                                              no nat client  real 10.1.10.10 local   inservice serverfarm webfarm  nat server  no nat client  real 10.1.30.10   inservice  real 10.1.30.11   inservice serverfarm forward-route  no nat server                                                              no nat client  predictor forward vserver https-vip  virtual 10.1.10.100 tcp https  vlan 10  serverfarm ssl-accel-farm  inservice vserver http-vip  virtual 10.1.10.100 tcp www  serverfarm webfarm  persistent rebalance  inservice vserver direct-web  virtual 10.1.30.0 255.255.255.0 any  serverfarm forward-route  inservice vserver direct-ssl  virtual 10.1.99.0 255.255.255.0 any  serverfarm forward-route  inservice 

Here are some notes to help you understand the configuration in Example 11-7.

  • Recall from Chapter 10 that configuring bridge-mode requires that you give the client VLAN 10 and server VLAN 20 interfaces the same IP address (that is, 10.1.10.1 in Example 11-7).

  • Use the no nat server command to prevent the CSM from DNATing client requests to the SSL daughter card (thus enabling dispatch-mode processing).

  • The virtual server "http-vip" serves traffic from both cleartext client requests and from unencrypted traffic forwarded by the SSL daughter card.

  • The command vlan 10 within the "https-vip" virtual server configuration indicates that the virtual server shall receive traffic from only VLAN 10.

  • You need to include the local keyword when configuring the SSL daughter card as a real server within a server farm. This keyword indicates to the CSM that the real server is the SSL daughter card and not an external real server.

  • The "direct-type" virtual server is necessary for you to be able to directly connect to your secure router-mode real servers for testing purposes. You also need to add a static route to the MSFC pointing to the CSM client IP address for the subnet of the router-mode reals (for example, ip route 10.1.30.0 255.255.255.0 10.1.10.1, in Example 11-7).

  • VLAN 99 is for administering the SSL daughter card using Telnet.

  • Because the SSL devices preserve the source IP address of the packet as the client's IP address, the CSM-S must use special routing for real-server return traffic. If the CSM-S uses normal routing, the cleartext real server return packets are routed to the client directly, bypassing the SSL daughter card. Therefore, the CSM-S routes the back-end real server return packets to the SSL daughter card by tracking the Layer 2 MAC address of the SSL daughter card during the connection flow.

Example 11-8 gives the corresponding SSL daughter card configuration for CSM-S termination. Whereas with the CSM-S you did not have to directly configure the SSL module with IP addressing, you must configure the CSM-S daughter card with an IP address and default gateway. The SSL daughter card is a separate TCP/IP host on the network and, as such, it responds to ARP requests. You must also administer it separately via Telnet through a separate command line interface.

Example 11-8. Configuring Your SSL Daughter Card for SSL Termination

 ssl-proxy vlan 99  ipaddr 10.1.99.3 255.255.255.0  gateway 10.1.99.1  admin ssl-proxy vlan 20  ipaddr 10.1.10.10 255.255.255.0  gateway 10.1.10.1 ssl-proxy service ssl-termination  virtual ipaddr 10.1.10.100 protocol tcp port 443 secondary  server ipaddr 10.1.10.1 protocol tcp port 80  no nat server  certificate rsa mycontent-trustpoint certs-key  inservice 

Here are some notes to help you understand the configuration in Example 11-8.

  • The ssl-proxy service command creates the virtual server called "ssl-termination." Virtual servers on the daughter card function in the same manner as on content switches. You must assign the same IP address and port to the virtual server. When the SSL proxy receives packets that match the virtual server, it decrypts the packets and sends them to the configured real server using the server command, which is simply its default gateway (that is, the CSM-S IP address 10.1.10.1). If there were multiple CSM-Ss, you would add them using the server command.

  • Because this is a dispatch-mode configuration, you should disable server DNAT on the SSL daughter card using the no nat server command; otherwise, the request will be DNATed from the VIP to the IP address of the CSM.

  • Specify the RSA certificate that you want to assign to the service by using the certificate rsa command. This example uses the certificate "mycontent-trustpoint" imported in Example 11-6.

  • Because the SSL daughter card is in bridge-mode and is configured with the same virtual IP as the CSM-S, it receives the same ARP requests from the MSFC that the CSM-S receives. The secondary keyword prevents the SSL daughter card from responding to these ARP requests.

Configuring URL and Header Rewrite on the CSM

To enable the SSL daughter card to insert HTTP headers to inform the server that the SSL daughter card is proxying the connection, you can create an HTTP header policy on the SSL daughter card. Example 11-9 illustrates how to create an HTTP header policy and assign it to an SSL proxy service.

Example 11-9. Creating an HTTP Header Policy

 ssl-proxy policy http-header insert-session-info   session ssl-proxy service ssl-termination  virtual ipaddr 10.1.10.100 protocol tcp port 443 secondary  server ipaddr 10.1.10.1 protocol tcp port 80  no nat server  certificate rsa mycontent-trustpoint certs-key  policy http-header insert-session-info                                     inservice 

Similar to the CSS SSL daughter card, if your servers send HTTP 300 series redirects to your clients, then you should configure your CSM-S to rewrite the "http://" reference in the "Location:" header. To inspect the "Location:" header and replace "http://" with "https://" on the SSL daughter card, you can use the configuration in Example 11-10.

Example 11-10. Creating an HTTP URL Rewrite Policy

 ssl-proxy policy url-rewrite rewrite-redirects  url *.cisco.com  url www.cisco.*  url www.cisco.com sslport 444  url www.cisco.com sslport 444 clearport 81 ssl-proxy service ssl-termination  virtual ipaddr 10.1.10.100 protocol tcp port 443 secondary  server ipaddr 10.1.10.1 protocol tcp port 80  no nat server  certificate rsa mycontent-trustpoint certs-key  policy url-rewrite rewrite-redirects                                       inservice 



Content Networking Fundamentals
Content Networking Fundamentals
ISBN: 1587052407
EAN: 2147483647
Year: N/A
Pages: 178

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