Chapter Summary


This summary of vim includes all the commands covered in this chapter, plus a few more. Table 6-12 lists some of the ways you can call vim from the command line.

Table 6-12. Calling vim

Command

Result

vim filename

Edits filename starting at line 1

vim +n filename

Edits filename starting at line n

vim + filename

Edits filename starting at the last line

vim +/pattern filename

Edits filename starting at the first line containing pattern

vim r filename

Recovers filename after a system crash

vim R filename

Edits filename readonly (same as opening the file with view)


You must be in Command mode to use commands that move the cursor by Units of Measure (Table 6-13). You can use these Units of Measure with Change, Delete, and Yank commands. Each of these commands can be preceded by a Repeat Factor.

Table 6-13. Moving the cursor by Units of Measure

Command

Moves the cursor

SPACE, l (lowercase "l"), or RIGHT ARROW

Space to the right

h or LEFT ARROW

Space to the left

w

Word to the right

W

Blank-delimited word to the right

b

Word to the left

B

Blank-delimited word to the left

$

End of line

e

End of word to the right

E

End of blank-delimited word to the right

0 (zero)

Beginning of line (cannot be used with a Repeat Factor)

RETURN

Beginning of next line

j or DOWN ARROW

Down one line

Beginning of previous line

k or UP ARROW

Up one line

)

End of sentence

(

Beginning of sentence

}

End of paragraph

{

Beginning of paragraph

%

Move to matching brace of same type at same nesting level


Table 6-14 shows the commands that enable you to view different parts of the Work buffer.

Table 6-14. Viewing the Work buffer

Command

Moves the cursor

CONTROL-D

Forward one-half window

CONTROL-U

Backward one-half window

CONTROL-F or PAGE DOWN

Forward one window

CONTROL-B or PAGE UP

Backward one window

nG

To line n (without n, to the last line)

H

To top of window

M

To middle of window

L

To bottom of window


The commands in Table 6-15 enable you to add text to the buffer. All these commands, except r, leave vim in Input mode. You must press ESCAPE to return to Command mode.

Table 6-15. Adding text

Command

Adds text

i

Before cursor

I

Before first nonblank character on line

a

After cursor

A

At end of line

o

Open a line below current line

O

Open a line above current line

r

Replace current character (no ESCAPE needed)

R

Replace characters, starting with current character (overwrite until ESCAPE)


Table 6-16 lists commands that delete and change text. In this table M is a Unit of Measure that you can precede with a Repeat Factor, n is an optional Repeat Factor, and c is any character.

Table 6-16. Deleting and changing text

Command

Result

nx

Deletes the number of characters specified by n, starting with the current character

nX

Deletes n characters before the current character, starting with the character preceding the current character

dM

Deletes text specified by M

ndd

Deletes n lines

dtc

Deletes to the next character c on the current line

D

Deletes to end of the line

n~

Change case of the next n characters

The following commands leave vim in Input mode. You must press ESCAPE to return to Command mode.

ns

Substitutes n characters

S

Substitutes for the entire line

cM

Changes text specified by M

ncc

Changes n lines

ctc

Changes to the next character c on the current line

C

Changes to end of line


Table 6-17 lists search commands. Here rexp is a regular expression that can be a simple string of characters.

Table 6-17. Searching

Command

Result

/rexpRETURN

Searches forward for rexp

?rexpRETURN

Searches backward for rexp

n

Repeats original search exactly

N

Repeats original search, in the opposite direction

/RETURN

Repeats original search forward

?RETURN

Repeats original search backward

fc

Positions the cursor on the next character c on the current line

Fc

Positions the cursor on the previous character c on the current line

tc

Positions the cursor on the character before (to the left of) the next character c on the current line

Tc

Positions the cursor on the character after (to the right of) the previous character c on the current line

;

Repeats the last f, F, t, or T command


The format of a Substitute command is

:[address]s/search-string/replacement-string[/g]

where address is one line number or two line numbers separated by a comma. A . (period) represents the current line, $ represents the last line, and % represents the entire file. You can use a marker or a search string in place of a line number. The search-string is a regular expression that can be a simple string of characters. The replacement-string is the replacement string. A g indicates a global replacement (more than one replacement per line).

Table 6-18 lists miscellaneous vim commands.

Table 6-18. Miscellaneous commands

Command

Result

J

Joins the current line and the following line

.

Repeats the most recent command that made a change

:w filename

Writes contents of Work buffer to filename (or to current file if there is no filename)

:q

Quits vim

ZZ

Writes contents of Work buffer to the current file and quits vim

:f or CONTROL-G

Displays the filename, status, current line number, number of lines in the Work buffer, and percentage of the Work buffer preceding the current line

CONTROL-V

Inserts the next character literally even if it is a vim command (use in Input mode)


Table 6-19 lists commands that yank and put text. In this table M is a Unit of Measure that you can precede with a Repeat Factor and n is a Repeat Factor. You can precede any of these commands with the name of a buffer using the form "x, where x is the name of the buffer (az).

Table 6-19. Yanking and putting text

Command

Result

yM

Yanks text specified by M

nyy

Yanks n lines

Y

Yanks to end of line

P

Puts text before or above

p

Puts text after or below


Table 6-20 lists advanced vim commands.

Table 6-20. Advanced commands

Command

Result

mx

Sets marker x, where x is a letter from a to z.

'' (two single quotation marks)

Moves cursor back to its previous location.

'x

Moves cursor to line with marker x.

` x

Moves cursor to character with marker x.

:e filename

Edits filename, requiring you to write out changes to the current file (with :w or autowrite) before editing the new file. Use :e! filename to discard changes to the current file. Use :e! without a filename to discard changes to the current file and start editing the saved version of the current file.

:n

Edits the next file when vim is started with multiple filename arguments. Requires you to write out changes to the current file (with :w or autowrite) before editing the next file. Use :n! to discard changes to the current file and edit the next file.

:rew

Rewinds the filename list when vim is started with multiple filename arguments and starts editing with the first file. Requires you to write out changes to the current file (with :w or autowrite) before editing the first file. Use :rew! to discard changes to the current file and edit the first file.

:sh

Starts a shell. Exit from the shell to return to vim.

:!command

Starts a shell and executes command.

!!command

Starts a shell, executes command, and places output in the Work buffer, replacing the current line.





A Practical Guide to UNIX[r] for Mac OS[r] X Users
A Practical Guide to UNIX for Mac OS X Users
ISBN: 0131863339
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2005
Pages: 234

Similar book on Amazon

flylib.com © 2008-2017.
If you may any questions please contact us: flylib@qtcs.net