Table of Contents


professional xna game programming: for xbox 360 and windows
Professional XNA Game Programming: For Xbox 360 and Windows
byBenjamin Nitschke
Wrox Press 2007 (504 pages)
ISBN:9780470126776

Written for anyone who wants to write their own games for the Xbox 360 or Windows platforms, this guide shows you how to take advantage of the XNA Game Studio Express tools and libraries in order to build cutting-edge games.

Table of Contents
Professional XNA Game Programming-For Xbox 360 and Windows
Credits
Introduction
Part I - XNA Framework Basics
Chapter 1 - Introducing XNA
Chapter 2 - Creating Your First Game-Pong
Chapter 3 - Helper Classes
Chapter 4 - Game Components
Part II - Basic Graphics Engine
Chapter 5 - Writing Your Own XNA Graphics Engine
Chapter 6 - Shader Management
Chapter 7 - Realism through Normal Mapping
Chapter 8 - Post-Screen Shaders and the Rocket Commander Game
Part III - Improving Your Game Engine
Chapter 9 - Adding Sound with XACT
Chapter 10 - Player Input and the User Interface
Chapter 11 - Creating XNA Shooter
Part IV - Writing a Racing Game
Chapter 12 - Generating Landscapes and Tracks
Chapter 13 - Physics
Chapter 14 - Fine-Tuning and “Modding” the Racing Game
Appendix A - Resources
Index


Back Cover

You haven't experienced the full potential of Xbox 360 or Windows until you've created your own homebrewed games for these innovative systems. With Microsoft's new XNA Framework, the only thing limiting you is your imagination. Now professional game developer and Microsoft DirectX MVP Benjamin Nitschke shows you how to take advantage of the XNA Game Studio Express tools and libraries in order to build cutting-edge games.

Whether you want to explore new worlds or speed down a city block in a souped up dragster, this book will get you up and running quickly. You'll learn how to implement 3D models, generate huge landscapes, map cool-looking shaders to your 3D objects, and much more. Nitschke also steps you through the development of your first fully functional racing game. You'll then be able to apply this information as you write your own XNA cross-platform games.

What you will learn from this book

  • Tricks for managing the game engine and user interface
  • How to program an old school shooter game and space adventure
  • Tips for improving racing game logic and expanding your game ideas
  • Methods for integrating amazing visual effects using advanced shader techniques
  • Steps for adding sound and music with XACT-bringing your game to life
  • How to fine-tune and debug your game for optimal performance

Who this book is for

This book is for anyone who wants to write their own games for the Xbox 360 or Windows platforms. You should have some experience coding with C# or a similar .NET language.

About the Author

Benjamin Nitschke is the founder, lead programmer, and game designer at exDream entertainment. He is 26 years old, lives in Hannover, Germany, and also became a DirectX MVP of Microsoft in 2006 for his outstanding work in the DirectX community, especially with the free game Rocket Commander.

He started young-at the age of 9 he bought his first computer, a C64. He did not have many games, but he was very eager to type in commands on the C64, and from that to writing the first applications and games in Basic was not a big step. A few years later he finally got a PC (386) and started some small game projects (Tetris clones, shoot-em-up games, and so on). exDream entertainment was founded 10 years ago, and they released a couple of smaller games until the first RTS game Arena Wars was created. Arena Wars was the first commercial .NET game ever and was released in 2004, where it received more than 20 awards worldwide, especially for the great multiplayer modes.

Recently Benjamin has developed a couple of free open source games like Rocket Commander and the XNA Racing Game Starter Kit and many game modifications for these games. These games feature many video tutorials and a good documentation and code style to help beginners create their first video games. The video tutorials were watched more than 100,000 times and the games were downloaded and played even more often than that.