Table of Contents


molecular computing
Molecular Computing
by Tanya Sienko, Andrew Adamatzky, Nicholas G. Rambidi and Michael Conrad (eds)  ISBN:0262194872
The MIT Press © 2003 (257 pages)

This text covers abstract principles of molecular computing and the building of actual systems. Topics include the use of proteins and other molecules for information processing, molecular recognition, computation in nonlinear media, and more.

Table of Contents
Molecular Computing
In Memoriam
Introduction—What Is Molecular Computing?
Chapter 1 - Conformation-Based Computing—A Rationale and a Recipe
Chapter 2 - Molecular Recognition—Storage and Processing of Molecular Information
Chapter 3 - Computing in Reaction-Diffusion and Excitable Media—Case Studies of Unconventional Processors
Chapter 4 - Chemical-Based Computing and Problems of High Computational Complexity—The Reaction-Diffusion Paradigm
Chapter 5 - DNA Computing and Its Frontiers
Chapter 6 - Bioelectronics and Protein-Based Optical Memories and Processors
Chapter 7 - Bioelectronics and Biocomputers
Index
List of Figures
List of Tables
List of Sidebars


Back Cover

The next great change in computer science and information technology will come from mimicking the techniques by which biologic organisms process information. To do this computer scientists must draw on expertise in subject not usually associated with their field, including organic chemistry, molecular biology, bioengineering, and smart materials. This book provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of molecular computing.

This book moves from abstract principles of molecular computing to the building of actual systems. The topics include the use of proteins and other molecules for information processing, molecular recognition, computation in nonlinear media, computers based on physical reaction-diffusion systems found in chemical media, DNA computing, bioelectronics and protein-based optical computing, and biosensors.

About the Editors

Tanya Sienko is Chief Operating Officer of Paranoid Capital Management LLC.

Andrew Adamatzky is Senior Research Fellow in the Faculty of Computing, Engineering, and Mathematical Sciences at the University of the West of England, Bristol.

Nicholas G. Rambidi is Professor of Physics at Moscow State University.

The late Michael Conrad was Professor of Computer Science at Wayne State University.



Molecular Computing

Tanya Sienko

Andrew Adamatzky

Nicholas Rambidi

Michael Conrad

The MIT Press
Cambridge, Massachusetts
London, England

Copyright © 2003 Massachusetts Institute of Technology

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means (including photocopying, recording, or information storage and retrieval) without permission in writing from the publisher.

This book was set in Times New Roman on 3B2 by Asco Typesetters, Hong Kong, and was printed and bound in the United States of America.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Molecular computing / edited by Tanya Sienko [et al.].
p. cm.
Includes bibliographical references and index.

0-262-19487-2

(hc. : alk. paper)
1. Molecular computers. I. Sienko, Tanya.
QA76.887.M65 2003
621.391—dc21 2002044409

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Dedicated to the memory of Michael Conrad, who died during the preparation of this book

Contributors

Andrew Adamatzky
Computing, Engineering, and Mathematical Sciences University of the West of England Bristol, England

Robert R. Birge
W. M. Keck Center for Molecular Electronics and Department of Chemistry Syracuse University Syracuse, New York and: Departments of Chemistry and Molecular and Cell Biology University of Connecticut Storrs, Connecticut

Michael Conrad (deceased)
Department of Computer Science Wayne State University Detroit, Michigan

Isao Karube
School of Bionics Tokyo Institute of Technology Hachioji, Tokyo

Jean-Marie Lehn
College de France Strasbourg, France

Carlo C. Maley
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Seattle, Washington

Duane L. Marcy
W. M. Keck Center for Molecular Electronics and Department of Chemistry Syracuse University Syracuse, New York

Nicholas G. Rambidi
International Research Institute for Management Sciences and Physics Department Moscow State University Moscow, Russia

Satoshi Sasaki
Katayanagi Advanced Research Laboratories Tokyo University of Technology Hachioji, Tokyo

Tanya Sienko
Institute of Computer Science Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany

Bryan W. Vought
W. M. Keck Center for Molecular Electronics and Department of Chemistry Syracuse University Syracuse, New York and Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology Harvard Medical School Boston, Massachusetts

Klaus-Peter Zauner
Institute of Computer Science Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany