Answers to Exam Prep Questions


1.

A, D, E. To get the database back to as current a point as possible, you need to back up the log one final time to get any entries that have occurred from the last log backup to the point of the failure. You then need to restore the last full backup as a known point where the whole database was saved. To get the data as current as possible from that point, you need to restore all logs by specifying the STOPAT option to get a point-in-time restore to a moment just before the damage occurred. For more information, refer to the sections "Setting the Options of a Backup" and "Restoring Data from a Backup" in this chapter.

2.

A, D. To perform log backups, you cannot have the databases set to a simple recovery mode. You need to select either the full model or the bulk-logged model for each database. You cannot perform log backups on the master database. Every other database can be included. For more information, consult the sections "Recovery Models Using T-SQL" and "Using a Backup for a System Database" in this chapter.

3.

A. You can validate the backup media at any time by using the RESTORE VERIFYONLY statement. The CHECKSUM operation can be performed only at the time of the backup. For more information, refer to the section "Using the T-SQL RESTORE Statement" in this chapter.

4.

B. The HEADERONLY option provides a list of the backup header information for every backup set on the media. LABELONLY returns a result set that contains information about the backup media identified by the given device but no details about the backup sets. You can validate the backup media at any time by using the RESTORE VERIFYONLY statement, but this doesn't solve the problem in question. Backups would be rather useless if they could only be used from the originating server. For more information, refer to the section "Using the T-SQL RESTORE Statement" in this chapter.

5.

C. The information for all jobs and schedules is maintained in the msdb database. If you restore this database from a backup, you will recover anything of this nature that you have created. It is possible to create scripts for all these processes, but that would be a lengthy and arduous task. For more information, refer to the section "Automating Maintenance with Job Scheduling" in this chapter.

6.

D. The master..sysobjects table contains information about a lot of objects stored on the server but not for jobs and schedules that are exclusively stored in msdb. You could execute a join query to resolve the problem, but it would take a significant amount of time to formulate one that would produce the desired results. The msdb..sysschedules table contains schedule information but no historical information about the job's execution. When in doubt, you should use stored procedures to solve a problem like this. For more information, refer to the section "Automating Maintenance with Job Scheduling" in this chapter.

7.

B, E. Any time you intend to restore more backups onto a destination database, you use the NORECOVERY option. You use STANDBY only if the destination is to be a read-only server. RECOVERY makes the database active, and no further logs can be restored. For more information, refer to the "Setting the Options of a Backup" section in this chapter.




MCTS 70-431(c) Implementing and Maintaining Microsoft SQL Server 2005
MCTS 70-431 Exam Cram: Implementing and Maintaining Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Exam
ISBN: 0789735881
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2006
Pages: 200
Authors: Thomas Moore

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