The Accountable Organization: Reclaiming Integrity, Restoring Trust - page 57


Notes

Chapter 1

  1. "President Bush Signs Corporate Corruption Bill," press release/transcript of speech issued by the White House press secretary's office, the East Room, the White House, July 30, 2002.

  2. Jeffrey M. Jones, "Americans Express Little Trust in CEOs of Large Corporations or Stockbrokers," Gallup News Service, July 17, 2002.

  3. "Volcker on the Crisis of Faith," interview by Mike McNamee. BusinessWeek, June 24, 2002, 42.

  4. Testimony of Chairman Alan Greenspan at the Federal Reserve Board's semiannual monetary policy report to the Congress before the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, U.S. Senate, July 16, 2002.

  5. Francis Fukuyama, Trust: The Social Virtues and the Creation of Prosperity (New York: Free Press, 1995), 26, 51.

  6. Raymond Spencer, chairman and CEO of Kanbay, Inc., interview by author, July 26, 2002.

  7. Bob Bingham, CEO of The Little Gym, Inc., interview by author, June 25, 2002.

  8. Santo J. Costa, interview by author, March 17, 2003.

  9. Robert Levering and Milton Moskowitz, "The Best in the Worst of Times," Fortune 145, 3 (February 4, 2002): 60.

  10. Daniel Roth, "How to Cut Pay, Lay Off 8,000 People, and Still Have Workers Who Love You," Fortune 145, 3 (February 4, 2002): 64.

  11. Ibid., 66.

  12. Ibid., 68.

  13. "Agilent President and CEO Ned Barnholt and CFO Adrian Dillon Discuss Q4 Fiscal 2002 Results," interview posted online at http://www.agilent.com.

Chapter 2

  1. "Treasury Secretary Criticizes Misconduct," Wall Street Journal, June 14, 2002.

  2. Remarks of Attorney General John Ashcroft at WorldCom press conference, Department of Justice, Washington, DC, August 1, 2002.

  3. Quotes are from Bob Bingham, Raymond Spencer, Santo J. Costa, and Dave Wolfenden, respectively.

  4. My thanks to Michael Saul, Michelle Saul, and James Newton for this example.

  5. John Kadlic, vice president, client services, of Blue Diesel; interview by author, March 6, 2003.

Chapter 3

  1. Charles Schwab advertisement, printed in Newsweek, December 29, 2002.

  2. Charles Schwab commercial, rebroadcast as part of a report on National Public Radio's "Morning Edition," June 11, 2002.

  3. The Merrill settlement was included in this total.

  4. "SEC, NY Attorney General, NASD, NASAA, NYSE and State Regulators Announce Historic Agreement to Reform Investment Practices," press release, Office of New York State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, December 20, 2002. Less than a year later, Grasso would resign amid controversy surrounding his $140 million-plus pay package.

  5. Stephen L. Carter, Integrity (New York: Basic Books, 1996), 5–6.

  6. Ibid., 6.

  7. Ethics (A Magill Ready Reference Book), consulting ed. John K Roth (Pasadena, CA: Salem Press, 1994), 441.

  8. Santo J. Costa, interview by author, March 17, 2003.

  9. Center for Academic Integrity, http://www.academicintegrity.org.

  10. Knox College Student Handbook, 2002-2003, 35.

  11. From http://www.turnitin.com.

  12. Center for Academic Integrity, http://www.academicintegrity.org.

  13. Center for Academic Integrity, "The Fundamental Values of Academic Integrity" (brochure), October 1999, 6.

  14. Daniel Roth, "How to Cut Pay, Lay Off 8,000 People, and Still Have Workers Who Love You," Fortune 145, 3 (February 4, 2002): 63.

Chapter 4

  1. Michael E. Gerber, The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It (New York: HarperCollins, 1995), 57.

  2. Jim Collins, Good to Great (New York: HarperCollins, 2001), 195.

  3. Daryl Travis, Emotional Branding: How Successful Brands Gain the Irrational Edge (Roseville, CA: Prima Publishing, 2000), 102.

  4. Collins, 195.

Chapter 5

  1. Robert Bruce Shaw, Trust in the Balance: Building Successful Organizations on Results, Integrity, and Concern (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997), 78.

  2. Gordon Shaw, Robert Brown, and Philip Bromily, "Strategic Stories: How 3M Is Rewriting Business Planning," Harvard Business Review (May–June 1998): 42.

  3. Ibid., 50.

  4. Chris Argyris, Flawed Advice and the Management Trap: How Managers Can Know When They're Getting Good Advice and When They're Not (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000), 40–41.

  5. Ibid., 43.

  6. Ibid., 159.

Chapter 6

  1. Rakesh Khurana, Searching for a Corporate Savior: The Irrational Quest for Charismatic CEOs (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2002), 69.

  2. Robert J. Shiller, "Celebrity CEOs Share the Blame for Street Scandals," Wall Street Journal, June 27, 2002, citing ideas from Khurana's Searching for a Corporate Savior: The Irrational Quest for Charismatic CEOs (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2002).

  3. Warren Bennis, On Becoming a Leader (Cambridge, MA: Perseus Books, 1989), 3.

  4. Daniel G. Goleman, Richard Boyatzis, and Annie McKee, Primal Leadership: Realizing the Power of Emotional Intelligence (Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2002), 3.

  5. Peter M. Senge, The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization (New York: Currency Doubleday, 1990), 357.

  6. Joseph L. Badaracco Jr., Defining Moments: When Managers Must Choose Between Right and Right (Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1997).

  7. Walt Sutton, Leap of Strength: A Personal Tour Through the Months Before and Years After You Start Your Business (Los Angeles: Silver Lake Publishing, 2000), 97.

  8. David Wolfenden, DMB, interview by author, August 19, 2002.

  9. The term emotional intelligence was popularized in the late 1990s by Daniel Goleman. In his first book on the subject, Emotional Intelligence, Goleman argues that EQ is a better predictor of achievement than IQ. As he defines it, emotional intelligence is "the capacity for recognizing our own feelings and those of others, for motivating ourselves, and for managing emotions well in ourselves and in our relationships" (317). In his model, there are five measurable areas of emotional intelligence: self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skills. Later empirical work by Goleman and others suggests that emotional intelligence is highly correlated with effective business leadership—greater than IQ, schooling, income, or other more traditional drivers of success.

  10. Howard Gardner, Intelligence Reframed (New York: Basic Books, 1999), 126–128.

  11. Craig Weber, president of Weber and Associates, interview by author, April 24, 2003.

  12. Joseph L. Badaracco Jr., Leading Quietly (Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2002), 9.

Chapter 7

  1. From Eudora's Web site, http://www.eudora.com/email/features/moodwatch.html.

  2. David Kaufer, "Flaming: A White Paper," June 2000, 5.

  3. Craig Weber, president of Weber and Associates, interview by author, April 24, 2003.

  4. Ibid.

  5. From http://www.rogen.com, http://www.goldhaber.com.

  6. See my working paper "Trust-Based Marketing: Building Winning Brands with Clarity and Purpose," at http://www.johnmarchica.com.

  7. Theodore Levitt, The Marketing Imagination, expanded ed. (New York: Free Press, 1986), 111.

  8. Paul Lukas, "Johnson & Johnson: Medicine Men," http://www.fortune.com, April 18, 2003.

  9. Richard Alsop, "Scandal-Filled Year Takes Toll on Firms," Wall Street Journal, February 12, 2003.

Chapter 8

  1. Craig Weber, president of Weber and Associates, interview by author, April 24, 2003.

  2. Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen, Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most (New York: Penguin Books, 1999), xvi-xvii.

  3. William Ury, Getting Past No: Negotiating Your Way from Confrontation to Cooperation, rev. ed. (New York: Bantam Books, 1993), 16.

  4. Some of the best work on dealing with organizational conflict is from Chris Argyris, a member of the Harvard faculty with joint appointments in education and business. Through his extensive research on organizational dynamics, Argyris acknowledges the problem of prescriptive, step-by-step advice on dealing with problems between people. He advises uncovering what is below the surface: the things people think but don't say, the mental models we assume as fact but are untested assumptions; the willingness to challenge and be challenged. See also the work of the Harvard Negotiation Project and, specifically, Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen, Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most (New York: Penguin Books, 1999), for an excellent guide to handling the most challenging workplace and personal conflicts.

  5. Thomas F. Crum, The Magic of Conflict (New York: Touchstone, 1987), 49.

  6. Kirk Blackard and James Gibson, Capitalizing on Conflict: Strategies and Practices for Turning Conflict to Synergy in Organizations (Palo Alto, CA: Davies-Black Publishing, 2002), 4.

Chapter 9

  1. John A. Byrne, "The Economic Drag of CEO Funk," http://www.businessweek.com, February 27, 2003.

  2. Jeffrey E. Garten, "Listen Up, Execs: Playing It Safe Won't Cut It," BusinessWeek, March 3, 2003, 28.

  3. Ibid.

  4. Jane Black, "Where ‘Think Different’ Is Taking Apple," http://www.businessweek.com, August 5, 2003.

  5. "Apple Launches the iTunes Music Store," Apple Computer press release, April 28, 2003.

  6. Black, "Where ‘Think Different’ Is Taking Apple."

  7. Devin Leonard, "Songs in the Key of Steve," http://www.fortune.com, April 28, 2003.

  8. Gary Hamel and Erick Schoenfeld, "Why It's Time to Take a Risk," Business 2.0 (April 2003): 63–68.

Chapter 10

  1. "CEO and President Gerard J. Arpey's Press Conference Remarks," American Airlines press release, April 25, 2003.

  2. Colleen Barrett, interview by author, March 13, 2003. All remarks by Barrett in this chapter are from this interview.

  3. Wade Goodwyn, "Profile: Success of Southwest Airlines," NPR, December 4, 2002.

  4. John Birger, "The 30 Best Stocks," Money (fall 2002): 90.

  5. From http://www.southwest.com.

Conclusion

  1. Marvin Bower, The Will to Manage: Corporate Success Through Programmed Management (New York: McGraw-Hill/The Marvin Bower Trust, 1966), 113.

  2. Peter M. Senge, The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization (New York: Currency Doubleday, 1990), 11.