Chapter 4


Chapter 4

  1. The trends and traits outlined here are intended to offer valuable insight about large groups of women, but should by no means be considered the final word. In fact, no single behavior pattern could ever be said to fit every woman in every situation. Furthermore, the behaviors we discuss in regard to groups of women may also be true of certain groups of men.

  2. See "Male- Female Brain Differences", http://www.brainplace.com/bp/malefemaledif/default.asp.

  3. Turhan Canli of the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and John Desmond, Zuo Zhao, and John Gabrielli of Stanford University, "Sex Differences in the Neural Basis of Emotional Memories", Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , August 6, 2002.

  4. Paco Underhill, Why We Buy: The Science of Shopping (New York: Touchstone, 1999), page 125 covers the related behavior of women asking sales questions more often than men do.

  5. See "Male-Female Brain Differences", http://www.brainplace.com/bp/malefemaledif/default.asp.

  6. Deborah Tannen, You Just Don't Understand: Women and Men in Conversation (New York: Morrow Publishing, 1990), page 38. Also see http://www.georgetown.edu/faculty/tannend/.

  7. Christiane Northrup, M.D., The Wisdom of Menopause (New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell, 2001). Also see http://www.drnorthrup.com.

  8. Paco Underhill, Why We Buy: The Science of Shopping (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1999), page 124. Also see http://www.envirosell.com.



Chapter 5

  1. The table is based on the U.S. Bureau of the Census estimate of the total population on July 1, 2002, by age and sex (Table NA-EST2002-ASRO-01, National Population EstimatesCharacteristics, Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau, Release Date: June 18, 2003, http://eire.census.gov/popest/data/national/tables/asro/NA-EST2002-ASRO-01.php). The estimates were further extrapolated based on the U.S. Census Bureau's estimate of total population on July 1, 2003 (http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/DTTable?_ts=91919418530), which grew by about 1.0 percent over 2002 from an estimated total U.S. population of 288.0 million in 2002 to an estimated total of 290.8 million in 2003 (http://eire.census.gov/popest/data/states/tables/NST-EST2003-03.php). For simplicity, it was then assumed that each age and gender bracket grew by this same amount from 2002 to 2003; and, further, in matching up the census data with the definition of each generation, it was assumed that within each age range in the census data that the population was spread out evenly. The resulting picture summarized in the table is a good approximation of the best information available at this time.

    For marketing purposes, Gen Y at the moment usually excludes those younger than tweens, that is, younger than age 6 (as of 2003). In a few years , as this generation gets older, Gen Y will probably refer to everyone born from 1980 to 1999.

    According to common usage as reflected in most dictionaries, Gen X includes all those in the United States born in the 1960s or 1970s (from 1960 to 1979); but for marketing purposes, it is common to segment out those born from 1960 to 1964 as members of the tail end of the postwar Baby Boom. Thus Gen X is confined to those born from 1965 to 1979; and the Baby Boomers those born from 1945 to 1964.

    Finally, then, we define all those born earlier, or before 1945 and who were age 59 or older in 2003, as the Mature generation.

  2. According to USA Today , cited in Women and Diversity : WOW! Facts 2002 (Washington, D.C.: Women's Business Network, 2002), page 141, http://www.wbni.com.

  3. According to Teenage Research Unlimited, http://www.teenresearch.com/home.cfm. Also cited in Women and Diversity: WOW! Facts 2002 , page 141.

  4. The recent Gallup survey of youth is cited in Neil Howe and William Strauss, Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation (New York: Vintage Books, 2000), page 218. Also cited in "Teens and Race", American Demographics , June 1999.

  5. U.S. Department of Education, 2000, http://www.ed.gov.

  6. Neil Howe and William Strauss, Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation , page 216.

  7. See http://www.quarterlifecrisis.com, and Alexandra Robbins and Abby Wilner, Quarterlife Crisis: The Unique Challenges of Life in Your Twenties (New York: J.P. Tarcher, 2001).

  8. See http://www.emkf.org.

  9. Lisa Finn, editor, Marketing to Women newsletter (New York: EPM Communications, Inc.), September 2000, http://www.epmcom.com.

  10. U.S. Census Bureau, September 2000, http://www.census.gov/prod/2000pubs/p20-526.pdf.

  11. See Lisa Finn, editor, All About Women Consumers (New York: EPM Communications, Inc., 2002), http://www.epmcom.com.

  12. Fall Full Year National Consumer Study (New York: Simmons Market Research Bureau, 2000), http://www.smrb.com.

  13. Jura Koncius, "Coming soon (maybe): A store for Gen Xers", The Washington Post , February 20, 2003.

  14. See http://www.MyPrimeTime.com, San Francisco, February, 2002.

  15. Fall 2002 National Consumer Study (New York: Simmons Market Research Bureau, Inc., 2002), http://www.smrb.com.

  16. Marsha Cohen, editor, Marketing to the 50-Plus Population (New York: EPM Communications, Inc., 2002), http://www.epmcom.com.

  17. Cheryl Richardson, Life Makeovers (New York: Broadway Books, 2000). Also see http://www.cherylrichardson.com.

  18. See Ken Dychtwald, Ph.D., http://www.agewave.com/presentations.shtml.

  19. Tips and Facts: A Handbook to Reaching the 50+ Market , The Business Forum on Aging, http://www.asaging.org/bfa/index.html.

  20. Lisa Finn, editor, All About Women Consumers (New York: EPM Communications, Inc., 2001), http://www.epmcom.com.

  21. Cited in Robyn Greenspan, "Senior Surfing Surges", November 20, 2003, in "The Big Picture Demographics" on http://www.internet.com. Also see http://www. nielsen -netratings.com.

  22. Cited by Tam Gray, CEO and founder, Seniorwomen.com, "Who We Are", http://www.seniorwomen.com/aboutus.html.

  23. Marsha Cohen, editor, Marketing to the 50-Plus Population , http://www.epmcom.com.

  24. Ibid.

  25. The Mature Traveler: 2000 Edition (Washington, D.C.: Travel Industry Association, 2000), http://www.tia.org.