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Practical RDF
By Shelley Powers
 
Publisher : O'Reilly
Pub Date : July 2003
ISBN : 0-596-00263-7
Pages : 350


The Resource Description Framework (RDF) is a structure for describing and interchanging metadata on the Web. Practical RDF explains RDF from the ground up, providing real-world examples and descriptions of how the technology is being used in applications like Mozilla, FOAF, and Chandler, as well as infrastructure you can use to build your own applications. This book cuts to the heart of the W3C's often obscure specifications, giving you tools to apply RDF successfully in your own projects.


   
  Table of Contents
  Index
  Reviews
  Reader Reviews
  Errata
Practical RDF
By Shelley Powers
 
Publisher : O'Reilly
Pub Date : July 2003
ISBN : 0-596-00263-7
Pages : 350


    Copyright
    Preface
      Audience
      Structure of This Book
      Conventions Used in This Book
      How to Contact Us
      Acknowledgments
    Chapter 1.  RDF: An Introduction
      Section 1.1.  The Semantic Web and RDF: A Brief History
      Section 1.2.  The Specifications
      Section 1.3.  When to Use and Not Use RDF
      Section 1.4.  Some Uses of RDF/XML
      Section 1.5.  Related Technologies
      Section 1.6.  Going Forward
    Chapter 2.  RDF: Heart and Soul
      Section 2.1.  The Search for Knowledge
      Section 2.2.  The RDF Triple
      Section 2.3.  The Basic RDF Data Model and the RDF Graph
      Section 2.4.  URIs
      Section 2.5.  RDF Serialization: N3 and N-Triples
      Section 2.6.  Talking RDF: Lingo and Vocabulary
    Chapter 3.  The Basic Elements Within the RDF/XML Syntax
      Section 3.1.  Serializing RDF to XML
      Section 3.2.  RDF Blank Nodes
      Section 3.3.  URI References
      Section 3.4.  Representing Structured Data with rdf:value
      Section 3.5.  The rdf:type Property
      Section 3.6.  RDF/XML Shortcuts
      Section 3.7.  More on RDF Data Types
      Section 3.8.  RDF/XML: Separate Documents or Embedded Blocks
    Chapter 4.  Specialized RDF Relationships: Reification, Containers, and Collections
      Section 4.1.  Containers
      Section 4.2.  Collections
      Section 4.3.  Reification: The RDF Big Ugly
    Chapter 5.  Important Concepts from the W3C RDF Vocabulary/Schema
      Section 5.1.  RDF Vocabulary: Describing the Data
      Section 5.2.  Core RDF Schema Elements
      Section 5.3.  Refining RDF Vocabularies with Constraints
      Section 5.4.  RDF Schema Alternatives
    Chapter 6.  Creating an RDF Vocabulary
      Section 6.1.  How RDF Vocabularies Differ from XML Vocabularies
      Section 6.2.  Defining the Vocabulary: Business and Scope
      Section 6.3.  Defining the Vocabulary: Elements
      Section 6.4.  Formalizing the Vocabulary with RDFS
      Section 6.5.  Integrating the Dublin Core
    Chapter 7.  Editing, Parsing, and Browsing RDF/XML
      Section 7.1.  BrownSauce
      Section 7.2.  Parsers
      Section 7.3.  Editors
    Chapter 8.  Jena: RDF in Java
      Section 8.1.  Overview of the Classes
      Section 8.2.  Creating and Serializing an RDF Model
      Section 8.3.  Parsing and Querying an RDF Document
      Section 8.4.  In-Memory Versus Persistent Model Storage
    Chapter 9.  RDF and Perl, PHP, and Python
      Section 9.1.  RDF/XML and Perl
      Section 9.2.  RDF API for PHP
      Section 9.3.  RDF and Python: RDFLib
    Chapter 10.  Querying RDF: RDF as Data
      Section 10.1.  RDF and the Relational Data Model
      Section 10.2.  Roots: rdfDB QL
      Section 10.3.  Inkling and SquishQL
      Section 10.4.  RDQL
      Section 10.5.  Sesame
    Chapter 11.  A Brief Look at Additional RDF Application Environments
      Section 11.1.  RDF and C#
      Section 11.2.  Wilbur RDF API CLOS
      Section 11.3.  Overview of Redlanda Multilanguage-Based RDF Framework
      Section 11.4.  Redfoot
    Chapter 12.  Ontologies: RDF Business Models
      Section 12.1.  Why Ontology?
      Section 12.2.  Brief History of the Ontology Movement
      Section 12.3.  OWL Use Cases and Requirements
      Section 12.4.  OWL Specifications
      Section 12.5.  Basic Constructs of OWL
      Section 12.6.  Bits of Knowledge: More Complex OWL Constructs
      Section 12.7.  The Complementary Nature of RDF and OWL
      Section 12.8.  Ontology Tools: Editors
    Chapter 13.  Subscription and Aggregation with RSS
      Section 13.1.  RSS: Quick History
      Section 13.2.  RSS 1.0: A Quick Introduction
      Section 13.3.  A Detailed Look at the Specification
      Section 13.4.  Extending the Specification Through Modules
      Section 13.5.  The RSS Modules
      Section 13.6.  RSS Aggregators
      Section 13.7.  Creating Your Own RSS Content
      Section 13.8.  Build Your Own RSS Consumer
      Section 13.9.  Merging RDF/RSS Files
    Chapter 14.  A World of Uses: Noncommercial Applications Based on RDF
      Section 14.1.  Mozilla
      Section 14.2.  Creative Commons License
      Section 14.3.  MIT's DSpace System Documentation
      Section 14.4.  FOAF: Friend-of-a-Friend
    Chapter 15.  A World of Uses: Commercial Uses of RDF/XML
      Section 15.1.  Chandler: RDF Within an Open Source PIM
      Section 15.2.  RDF Gateway, a Commercial RDF Database
      Section 15.3.  Siderean Software's Seamark
      Section 15.4.  Plugged In Software's Tucana Knowledge Store
      Section 15.5.  RDF and Adobe: XMP
      Section 15.6.  What's It All Mean?
    Colophon
    Index