Opening an Existing Spreadsheet


Opening an Existing Spreadsheet

As you continue to work with Google Spreadsheets, you'll want to return to spreadsheets you previously worked with. To open a spreadsheet you created during a previous session, either click the Open link or select File, Open. Either action opens the Open a Spreadsheet dialog box, shown in Figure 11. Click the spreadsheet you want to open from the list presented; that spreadsheet now opens in a new browser window.

Figure 11. Opening a previously saved spreadsheet.


Note

A new browser window opens only if you have a saved spreadsheet currently open. If you have a new, blank spreadsheet open, the spreadsheet you select will open in the current browser window.




Importing a Spreadsheet from Excel

Google Spreadsheets lets you import XLS- and CSV-format spreadsheet files created with Microsoft Excel. You can then work with these Excel spreadsheets from within Google Spreadsheets.

Note

XLS is the standard Excel worksheet format. A CSV (comma-separated values) file is a spreadsheet file in text format, with fields separated by commas.


To import an Excel file, follow these steps:

1.

Click the Open link or select File, Open.

2.

When the Open a Spreadsheet dialog box appears, click the Browse button.

3.

When the Choose File dialog box appears, navigate to and select the XLS or CSV file you want to import, then click the Open button.

4.

When the Open a Spreadsheet dialog box displays the message, "File imported successfully," click the Open Now link.

Google now displays the selected spreadsheet in a new browser window. You can now edit the spreadsheet as you like; Google automatically saves a copy of the file on its servers, for your future use.



Saving a Spreadsheet

When you are finished with a spreadsheet, you need to save the file. When you first save a file, you must do this manuallyand give the file a name. After this first save, Google automatically resaves the file every time you make a change to the spreadsheet. In essence, this means that you only have to save the spreadsheet once; Google saves all further changes automatically.

Note

Google's automatic file save feature is called, appropriately enough, Autosave.


To save a new spreadsheet, follow these steps:

1.

Click the Save button or select File, Save.

2.

When the dialog box shown in Figure 12 appears, enter a name for the spreadsheet.

Figure 12. Opening a previously saved spreadsheet.


3.

Click the OK button.

That's all there is to it. The spreadsheet is now saved on Google's servers, and you don't have to bother resaving it at any future point.

Just rememberthe spreadsheet file you just saved isn't on your PC's hard disk. It's stored on Google's servers, which means you must be connected to the Internet to access it. That's the thing about Google Spreadsheets; Google handles all the file storage, and your computer is used merely to access the Google Spreadsheets site. There are no Google Spreadsheets files stored on your computer, period. (Although you can choose to manually download a copy of any Google Spreadsheets file to your PC, as explained in the "Exporting a Google Spreadsheet to Excel Format" section coming up in a few moments.)



Saving a Copy of a Spreadsheet

You can, however, save a copy of any spreadsheet under a different name. You might want to do this if you want to keep different versions of a spreadsheet, for whatever reason.

To save a copy of a spreadsheet under a different name, follow these steps:

1.

Select File, Save As.

2.

When the dialog box appears, enter a new name for the spreadsheet.

3.

Click the OK button.

This closes the current spreadsheet and displays the newly saved spreadsheet in the current browser window. Any further editing you do is to the new spreadsheetuntil you reopen the original file, of course.