Tool 89: Gozinto Chart


Tool 89: Gozinto Chart

AKA 

N/A

Classification 

Planning/Presenting (PP)

Tool description

The Gozinto chart is a vertical tree diagram that displays hierarchical levels of detail of a complete product assembly to ship process. Developed by A. Vazsonyi, this project planning tool is of great value for kitting, bill of materials (BOM) auditing, parts /number identification, and operator training.

Typical application

  • To breakdown a product into its parts.

  • To flow out the assembly process.

  • To cross-reference parts data with the hierarchical levels of assembly.

Problem-solving phase

Select and define problem or opportunity

Identify and analyze causes or potential change

 

Develop and plan possible solutions or change

 

Implement and evaluate solution or change

 

Measure and report solution or change results

 

Recognize and reward team efforts

Typically used by

 

Research/statistics

 

Creativity/innovation

 

Engineering

1

Project management

3

Manufacturing

 

Marketing/sales

4

Administration/documentation

 

Servicing/support

 

Customer/quality metrics

2

Change management

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before

  • Tree diagram

  • Work breakdown structure (WBS)

  • Information Needs Analysis

  • Process analysis

  • Work flow analysis (WFA)

after

  • Failure Mode and Effect Analysis

  • Task Analysis

  • Potential Problem Analysis

  • Dendrogram

  • Activity analysis

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Notes and key points

  • Gozinto chart numbering is by levels and BOM or part identification number. Example: 3015: 3 for level 3, 015 for bill of material or part ID number.

  • This is a similar approach to the work breakdown structure (WBS) chart.

Step-by-step procedure

  • STEP 1 List all parts required to completely assemble the product.

  • STEP 2 Draw a hierarchy of assembly, showing levels of detail from the top down to the basic level of parts.

  • STEP 3 Provide identification of parts; name and number each part charted.

  • STEP 4 Check completeness of chart and date.

Example of tool application

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Tool 90: Histogram

AKA 

Histogram Analysis

Classification 

Analyzing/Trending (AT)

Tool description

A histogram is a column graph that displays the central tendency, process variability and relative frequency of collected data. Typically taken from a frequency distribution, a histogram is very effective in providing a visual presentation of how actual measurements of characteristics vary around a target or specification value.

Typical application

  • To show problematic process variations from a desired result or value.

  • To determine if the process variablity within a data distribution is within specification limits.

  • To identify shifts in process capability.

  • To verify changes in the process after improvements have been made.

Problem-solving phase

Select and define problem or opportunity

Identify and analyze causes or potential change

 

Develop and plan possible solutions or change

Implement and evaluate solution or change

Measure and report solution or change results

 

Recognize and reward team efforts

Typically used by

1

Research/statistics

 

Creativity/innovation

 

Engineering

2

Project management

4

Manufacturing

5

Marketing/sales

 

Administration/documentation

 

Servicing/support

3

Customer/quality metrics

 

Change management

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before

  • Checksheet

  • Frequency Distribution (FD)

  • Events log

  • Observation

  • Box Plot

after

  • Pareto chart

  • Multivariable Chart

  • Presentation

  • Pie Chart

  • Stratification

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Notes and key points

  • Preparation for grouping:

  • Determine the range ( R ) of the distribution

  • For small data sets ( N < 100): Number the class intervals (C.I.) between 5-10, if ( N > 100): Number the class intervals (C.I.) between 10-20.

  • Width of C.I. to be 2, 3, 5, 10, 20, for smaller samples, add zeros for larger data sets.

  • Select number of class intervals by calculating:

  • Check to determine if lowest data point in the data set is divisible an equal number of times by the C.I. width. if not, select the next lowest data point that is equally divisible.

Step-by-step procedure

  • STEP 5 List resulting Class Intervals (C.I.) and frequency ( f ):

    C.I.

    f

    9–11

    2

    12–14

    4

    15–17

    7

    18–20

    5

    21–23

    4

    24–26

    4

    27–29

    3

    30–32

    1

  • STEP 6 Construct a histogram. Apply the 3:4 ratio rule: The height of the Y axis must be 75 percent of the length (100 percent) of the X axis.

  • STEP 7 Complete the histogram to display the number of rework hours completed during the last 30 days. Date the histogram.

Example of tool application

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