Chapter 1


Chapter 1

  1. M. DePree, Leadership Is an Art, New York: Dell, 1990.

  2. R. Greenleaf, Servant Leadership: A Journey into the Nature of Legitimate Power and Greatness, New York: Paulist Press, 2002.

  3. A. Colby and W. Damon, Some Do Care: Contemporary Lives of Moral Commitment, New York: Free Press, 1992.

  4. Ibid., p. 29.

  5. P. T. Barnum quoted in J. Mueller, “The Role of Business Virtue in Economic Development: Six Propositions Provoked in Part by P.T. Barnum,” Templeton Foundation Institute for the Advanced Study of Freedom, 2000, p. 17.

  6. Colby and Damon, Some Do Care.

  7. H. Gardner, M. Csikszentmihalyi, and W. Damon, Good Work: When Excellence and Ethics Meet, New York: Basic Books, 2001.

  8. J. Collins and J. Porras, Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies, New York: Harper Business Essentials, 2002.

  9. G. Gilder, Wealth and Poverty, New York: Bantam Books, 1982;
    M. Novak, Business as a Calling: Work and the Examined Life, New York: Free Press, 1996.



Chapter 2

  1. Memorably, Balzac’s biting quip was quoted to me by the head of a large New York publishing company when I first shopped around for an outlet for this book.

  2. M. Medved, Hollywood vs. America: Popular Culture and the War on Traditional Values, New York: Free Press, 1993, p. 34.

  3. E. Erikson, Identity: Youth and Challenge, New York: W. W. Norton, 1968.

  4. M. Nisan, “Personal Identity and Education for the Desirable,” Journal of Moral Education (1996): 25, no. 1, pp. 75–83.

  5. A. Colby and W. Damon, Some Do Care: Contemporary Lives of Moral Commitment, New York: Free Press, 1992.

  6. Ibid.

  7. Ibid., p. 278.

  8. H. Gardner, M. Csikszentmihalyi, and W. Damon, Good Work: When Excellence and Ethics Meet, New York: Basic Books, 2001.

  9. W. Damon, The Moral Child: Nurturing Children’s Natural Growth, New York: Free Press, 1990.

  10. A. Etzioni, “When It Comes to Ethics, B-Schools Get an F,” Washington Post, August 4, 2000, referring to a recent Aspen Institute study.

  11. Ibid.

  12. M. E. P. Seligman and M. Csikszentmihalyi, “Positive Psychology: An Introduction,” American Psychologist (2000): 55, no. 1, pp. 5–14.

  13. Ibid.



Chapter 3

  1. W. Damon, “The Moral Development of Children,” Scientific American (1999): 281, pp. 72–88.

  2. Brenda Fink, personal correspondence.

  3. M. Csikszentmihalyi, Good Business, New York: Basic Books, 2003.

  4. Dean and Provost, March 2003, pp. 7–10.



Chapter 4

  1. W. Damon, The Moral Child: Nurturing Children’s Natural Moral Growth, New York: Free Press, 1990.

  2. P. Ekman, Emotions Revealed: Recognizing Faces and Feelings to Improve Communications and Emotional Life, New York: Times Books, 2003.

  3. Ibid.

  4. Ibid.



Chapter 5

  1. M. Novak, Business as a Calling: Work and the Examined Life, New York: Free Press, 1996.

  2. Aspen Institute study, circa 2000.

  3. A. Etzioni, “When It Comes to Ethics, B-Schools Get an F,” Washington Post, August 4, 2002.

  4. Ibid.

  5. Ibid.

  6. One exception to this is Michael Novak’s fine book Business as a Calling, cited above. My comments on ethics in this chapter draw on Novak’s learned philosophy. To my knowledge, his book has received far too little attention on the business education circuit.

  7. Ibid.

  8. Ibid., p. 107.

  9. C. W. Pollard, quoted in Religion and Liberty, vol. 10, no. 3 (May– June 2000): 1–4.