How Is the Book Organized?

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How Is the Book Organized?

The book has four main parts :

  • Part I , Bloopers in Content and Functionality of the Website, contains two chapters: Content Bloopers and Task-Support Bloopers.

  • Part II , Bloopers in User Interface of the Website, contains three chapters: Navigation Bloopers, Form Bloopers, and Search Bloopers.

  • Part III , Bloopers in Presentation of the Website, contains three chapters: Text and Writing Bloopers, Link Appearance Bloopers, and Graphic Design and Layout Bloopers.

  • Appendices: Extra information some readers may find useful: Memo to Managers, Websites Cited, How This Book was Usability Tested, Related Books and Websites, and Additional Web Bloopers.

The overall sequence of parts and chapters starts with deep issues of website content, operation, and task flow and proceeds to more surface-level issues of presentation.

Throughout the book are Tech Talk sidebars presenting technical methods for avoiding certain bloopers. This is supplemental information intended primarily for Web implementers. Nonimplementors can skip these.



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Web-Bloopers.com

Supplementing the book is a website, Web-Bloopers.com. There, readers will find:

  • Web Blooper checklist: A terse list of all 60 bloopers discussed in the book, suitable for printing. Use it to check websites before releasing them onto the Web.

  • Discussion area: A venue for issues and questions related to the book. Readers may use this to comment on the book, ask questions, answer others' questions, and submit blooper examples and new bloopers. The author will check this area periodically and participate in the discussion.

  • More Web Bloopers: Additional bloopers not included in the book. This will be seeded with bloopers that didn't make the book's "final cut," but hopefully will be extended over time by suggestions from readers.

  • Sample chapters: One or two chapters selected from the book, available for free download.

  • Purchase function: A way to buy the book from the publisher.

  • More: Additional content may be provided, depending on what readers request and the author and publisher decide makes sense to provide.



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Part 1: Bloopers in the Content and Functionality of the Website

Chapter List

Chapter 1: Content Bloopers
Chapter 2: Task-Support Bloopers



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Chapter 1: Content Bloopers

Overview

The Web is about content, first and foremost. Web analyst Jakob Nielsen writes :

Ultimately, users visit your website for its content. Everything else is just the backdrop. The design is there to allow people to access the content . ( Nielsen,1999 )

It doesn't matter whether a website is easy or difficult to use if it provides nothing useful, entertaining, up-to-date, or trustworthy. Few people will go there, and the few that do won't return.

To reflect the primacy of content on the Web, I begin with a chapter about bloopers in Web content. These are bloopers in the information a site provides-about products, services, or the organization itself. They are therefore more concerned with information design or information architecture (Rosenfeld and Morville 2002) than they are with Web design per se. Nevertheless, content is so important on the Web that any book about Web design mistakes must discuss problems of content.

click to expand
Hilary B. Pric. Reprinted with Special Permission of King Features Syndicate.



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