Looking at Your csh Configuration Files


Looking at Your csh Configuration Files

As Code Listing 8.18 (on the next page) shows, you can use more or the editor of your choice to peek at your csh configuration files. As with other shells, the csh configuration files run in a specific order:

  • System-wide configuration files (such as /etc/csh.cshrc)are read first upon log in.

  • The main configuration files specific to your Unix account (~/.cshrc) are read next if they're available.

  • The ~/.login configuration file is read last.

To look at your csh configuration files:

  • more ~/.cshrc ~/.login

    Type more followed by .cshrc and .login, which are the only possible names for csh configuration files. You'll see something similar to Code Listing 8.18. For our system, we have

    • ~/.cshrc (automatically called by the system)

    • ~/.login (automatically called by the system) if the shell is a login shell

Tip

  • The .cshrc file is executed when you start a new csh shell of any kind. The .login file is executed when you start a new login shell (by logging in or with su - yourid).


Fill in Your csh System Configuration Files

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________


Code Listing 8.18. Look for references to other paths or files in the listings, which might indicate other files used to set up your environment.

xmission> more ~/.cshrc ~/.login :::::::::::::: .cshrc :::::::::::::: # <@>(#)Cshrc 1.6 91/09/05 SMI set path = (/usr/local/bin /usr/local/bin/X11 /usr/openwin/bin /usr/bin     /usr/ucb /usr/etc /usr/local/games .) alias pwd     'echo $cwd' umask 066 if ($?USER == 0 || $?prompt == 0) exit set filec set history=40 set prompt="'hostname'> " # Edit the following lines as you wish setenv EDITOR "pico -t" setenv OPENWINHOME /usr/openwin setenv MANPATH /usr/man:/usr/local/man:/usr/openwin/man setenv LD_LIBRARY_PATH /usr/local/lib:/usr/openwin/lib setenv PAGER more limit coredumpsize 0 #      commands for interactive shells alias ls 'ls -F' alias cd 'cd \!*;echo $cwd' alias home    'cd ~' # MS-DOS aliases alias dir     'ls -alg' alias del     'rm -i' alias delete 'rm -i' alias copy    'cp -i' alias md 'mkdir' alias move    'mv -i' alias cls     'clear' alias clr     'clear' alias type    'more' # Terminal settings setenv TERM vt100 /usr/bin/stty rows 24 /usr/bin/stty cols 80 /usr/bin/stty erase '^?' :::::::::::::: .login :::::::::::::: # <@>(#)Login 1.14 90/11/01 SMI #      general terminal characteristics #/usr/bin/stty -crterase #/usr/bin/stty -tabs #/usr/bin/stty crt #/usr/bin/stty erase '^h' #/usr/bin/stty werase '^?' #/usr/bin/stty kill '^[' #/usr/bin/stty new #      environment variables #setenv EXINIT 'set sh=/bin/csh sw=4 ai report=2' #setenv MORE '-c' #setenv PRINTER lw #      commands to perform at login #w    # see who is logged in notice    # system information that must be read # # If possible, start the windows system.  Give user a chance to bail out # if ( 'tty' != "/dev/console" || $TERM != "sun" ) then      exit     # leave user at regular C shell prompt endif xmission> 




Unix(c) Visual Quickstart Guide
UNIX, Third Edition
ISBN: 0321442458
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2006
Pages: 251

Similar book on Amazon

flylib.com © 2008-2017.
If you may any questions please contact us: flylib@qtcs.net