Looking at Your ksh Configuration Files


Looking at Your ksh Configuration Files

As Code Listing 8.14 (on the next page) shows, you look at your ksh configuration files using more or the editor of your choice. Keep in mind that configuration files are run in a specific order:

  • System-wide configuration files (such as /etc/profile) run first upon log in.

  • Configuration files specific to your Unix account (such as ~/.profile) run next if they're available.

To look at your ksh configuration files:

1.

more /etc/profile ~/.profile

Type more followed by the names of traditional Korn shell configuration files. You'll see something similar to Code Listing 8.14. As before, look for any other filenames or ENV statements in the listings that would indicate other files that play a role in getting your ksh environment configured.

2.

For your own information, list the system configuration files that your system uses and the order in which they're called. For our system, we have

  • /etc/profile (automatically called by the system)

  • ~/.profile (automatically called by the system)

Tip

  • The .profile file is executed when you start a new login shell (by logging in or with su - yourid). The .kshrc file is read each time you start any ksh subshell.


Fill in Your ksh System Configuration Files

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Code Listing 8.14. Look for file and path names or ENV statements in the configuration file listings (for the files you have) to identify all of the files that help set up your environment.

$ more /etc/profile ~/.profile :::::::::::::: /etc/profile :::::::::::::: #ident  "@(#)profile1.17     95/03/28 SMI"   /* SVr4.0 1.3   */ # The profile that all logins get before using their own .profile. trap ""  2 3 export LOGNAME PATH if [ "$TERM" = "" ] then     if /bin/i386     then     TERM=AT386     else     TERM=sun     fi     export TERM fi #      Login and -su shells get /etc/profile services. #      -rsh is given its environment in its .profile. case "$0" in -sh | -ksh | -jsh)     if [ ! -f .hushlogin ]     then     /usr/sbin/quota     #    Allow the user to break the Message-Of-The-Day only.     trap "trap '' 2"  2     /bin/cat -s /etc/motd     trap "" 2     /bin/mail -E     case $? in     0)     echo "You have new mail."     ;;     2)     echo "You have mail."     ;;     esac     fi esac umask 022 trap  2 3 :::::::::::::: /home/users/e/ejray/.profile :::::::::::::: # PATH=$PATH:$HOME/bin:.  # set command search path export PATH if [ -z "$LOGNAME" ]; then     LOGNAME='logname' # name of user who logged in     export LOGNAME fi MAIL=/usr/spool/mail/$LOGNAME   # mailbox location export MAIL if [ -z "$PWD" ]; then     PWD=$HOME   # assumes initial cwd is HOME     export PWD fi if [ -f $HOME/.kshrc -a -r $HOME/.kshrc ]; then     ENV=$HOME/.kshrc    # set ENV if there is an rc file     export ENV fi # If job control is enabled, set the suspend character to ^Z (control-z): case $- in *m*) stty susp '^z'     ;; esac set -o ignoreeof # don't let control-d logout PS1="$ " export PS1 export ENV=$HOME/.kshrc :::::::::::::: /home/users/e/ejray/.kshrc :::::::::::::: # # If there is no VISUAL or EDITOR to deduce the desired edit #  mode from, assume vi(C)-style command line editing. if [ -z "$VISUAL" -a -z "$EDITOR" ]; then     set -o vi fi /etc/ksh.kshrc: No such file or directory $ 




Unix(c) Visual Quickstart Guide
UNIX, Third Edition
ISBN: 0321442458
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2006
Pages: 251

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