Glossary

    A

    B

    F

    G

    I

    K

    L

    P

    O

    R

    S

    T

    W

    V

A
alignment point

A particular point on each glyph to align any given script.

alphabetic baseline

The alignment point on a Western script used to determine the baseline for other glyphs in similar scripts.

area tree

An ordered tree containing geometric information for the placement of every glyph, shape, and image in the document, together with information embodying spacing constraints and other rendering information.

B
back-tracking (with regard to refinement)

Re-formatting a page area that has already been formatted.

baseline-tables

A part of the font tables provided to a formatter. Determines the alignment points between different fonts.

block-progression-direction

The direction in which blocks are stacked when building a page. From a Western perspective, this is top to bottom, more specifically, it starts at the before-edge, and ends at the after-edge.

Breaks

Page breaks may occur as determined by the formatter's processing as affected by the widow, orphan, keep-with-next, keep-with-previous, and keep-together properties.

Break conditions are either break-before or break-after. A break-before condition is satisfied if the first area generated and returned by the formatting object is leading within a context-area. A break-after condition depends on the next formatting object in the flow; the condition is satisfied if either there is no such next formatting object, or if the first normal area generated and returned by that formatting object is leading in a context-area.

Break conditions are imposed by the break-before and break-after properties. A refined value of page for these traits imposes a break condition with a context consisting of the page-reference-areas; a value of even-page or odd-page imposes a break condition with a context of even-numbered page-reference-areas or odd-numbered page-reference-areas, respectively; a value of column imposes a break condition with a context of column-areas. A value of auto in a break-before or break-after trait imposes no break condition.

F
flow map

The assignment of flows to regions on a page-master is determined by a flow-map. The flow-map is an association between the flow children of the fo:page-sequence and regions defined within the page-masters referenced by that fo:page-sequence.

font

A collection of glyphs together with the font tables necessary to use those glyphs to present characters via a formatter.

formatting

The process of turning the result of an XSL transformation into a tangible form for the reader, either on paper or on screen.

formatting objects

Elements in the formatting object tree whose names are from the XSL namespace; a formatting object belongs to a class of formatting objects identified by its element name. Some formatting objects are block-level and others are inline-level. Conceptually, processing a formatting object creates areas and returns them to its parent to be placed in the area tree.

G
glyph

A recognizable graphic symbol independent of any specific design. The letter A, as seen here, is a glyph with a specific design. The abstract form is the glyph.

I
ideographic baseline

The alignment point on Far-Eastern scripts, used to determine the baseline for other glyphs in similar scripts.

Indic baseline

The alignment point on Indic scripts, used to determine the baseline for other glyphs in similar scripts. Often aligned to a hanging baseline.

inline-progression-direction

From a Western perspective, left to right, going in the direction of line layout. More generally, following the direction at right angles to the block-progression-direction. Specifically, it leads from the start edge to the end edge of the page.

K
keeps

Keep conditions are either keep-with-previous, keep-with-next, or keep-together. A keep-with-previous condition on an object is satisfied if the first area generated and returned by the formatting object is not leading within a context-area, or if there are no preceding areas in a post-order traversal of the area tree. A keep-with-next condition is satisfied if the last area generated and returned by the formatting object is not trailing within a context-area, or if there are no following areas in a pre-order traversal of the area tree. A keep-together condition is satisfied if all areas generated and returned by the formatting object are descendants of a single context-area.

Keep conditions are imposed by the within-page, within-column, and within-line components of the keep-with-previous, keep-with-next, and keep-together properties. The refined value of each component specifies the strength of the keep condition imposed, with higher numbers being stronger than lower numbers and the value always being stronger than all numeric values. A component with a value of auto does not impose a keep condition. A within-page component imposes a keep condition with context consisting of the page-reference-areas; within-column, with context consisting of the column-areas; and within-line with context consisting of the line-areas.

L
leaders

The idea of a line leading the eye across a page to join two pieces of content.

length-range

The range of values specified by the minimum, maximum, and optimum values.

line-progression-direction

In most Western scripts, the left-to-right direction across the page.

P
page-level-out-of-line

An area with area-class xsl-footnote, xsl-before-float, or xsl-fixed; placement of these areas is controlled by the fo:page-sequence ancestor of its generating formatting object. A reference-level-out-of-line area is an area with area-class xsl-side-float or xsl-absolute; placement of these areas is controlled by the formatting object generating the relevant reference-area. An anchor area is an area with area-class xsl-anchor; placement of these areas is arbitrary and does not affect stacking. Areas with area-class equal to one of xsl-normal, xsl-footnote, or xsl-before-float are defined to be stackable, indicating that they are supposed to be properly stacked.

page-number-citation

The fo:page-number-citation element is used to reference the page number for the page containing the first normal area returned by the cited formatting object. It may be used to provide the page numbers in the table of contents, cross-references, and index entries.

page-sequence

Pages are generated by the formatter's processing of fo:page-sequence elements. The fo:page-sequence formatting object is used to specify how to create a (sub)sequence of pages within a document; for example, a chapter of a report. The content of these pages comes from flow children of the fo:page-sequence. The children of the fo:page-sequences, which are called flows (contained in fo:flow and fo:static-content), provide the content that is distributed into the pages. Page-sequence-masters have the role of describing the sequence of page-masters that will be used to generate pages during the formatting of an fo:page-sequence.

O
out-of-line

Formatting object content that is formatted into a separate area of a page where it is available to be read without immediately intruding on the reader.

R
Refinement

This is a computational process that finalizes the specification of properties based on the attribute values in the XML result tree.

reference areas

The Boolean trait is-reference-area determines whether or not an area establishes a coordinate system for specifying indents. An area for which this trait is true is called a reference-area. Only a reference-area may have a block-progression-direction that is different from that of its parent. A reference-area may be either a block-area or an inline-area.

S
script.

A collection of glyphs used in one specific language. A Western alphabet is a script.

sub-sequence-specifiers

A sequence of simple-page-master-references specified as the children of a page-sequence-master.

T
traits

Traits are to areas what properties are to formatting objects and attributes are to XML elements.

W
writing-mode

The XSL relative frame of reference has four directions (before, after, start, and end), but these are relative to the writing-mode. The writing-mode property is a way of controlling the directions needed by a formatter to correctly place glyphs, words, lines, blocks, etc. on the page or screen. The writing-mode expresses the basic directions noted above. There are writing-modes for left-to-right-top-to-bottom (denoted as lr-tb), right-to-left-top-to-bottom (denoted as rl-tb), top-to-bottom-right-to-left (denoted as tb-rl), and more.

Typically, the writing-mode value specifies two directions: the first is the inline-progression-direction, which determines the direction in which words will be placed, and the second is the block-progression-direction, which determines the direction in which blocks (and lines) are placed.

V
viewport

The Boolean trait is-viewport-area determines whether or not an area establishes an opening through which its descendant areas can be viewed and can be used to present clipped or scrolled material; for example, in printing applications where bleed and trim is desired. An area for which this trait is true is called a viewport-area. For example, region-body specifies a viewport/reference pair that is located in the center of the fo:simple-pagemaster.



XSL-FO
Xsl Fo
ISBN: 0596003552
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2002
Pages: 24
Authors: Dave Pawson

Similar book on Amazon

flylib.com © 2008-2017.
If you may any questions please contact us: flylib@qtcs.net