Section 4.3. Implementation


4.3. Implementation

The following configuration process begins following installation of Red Hat Fedora Core2 on the three servers shown in the network topology diagram in Figure 4.1. You have selected hardware that is appropriate to the task.

Figure 4.1. Network Topology 500 User Network Using tdbsam passdb backend.


4.3.1. Installation of DHCP, DNS, and Samba Control Files

Carefully install the configuration files into the correct locations as shown in Table 4.1. You should validate that the full file path is correct as shown.

Table 4.1. Domain: MEGANET, File Locations for Servers

File Information

Server Name

Source

Target Location

MASSIVE

BLDG1

BLDG2

Example 4.3.1

/etc/samba/smb.conf

Yes

No

No

Example 4.3.2

/etc/samba/dc-common.conf

Yes

No

No

Example 4.3.3

/etc/samba/common.conf

Yes

Yes

Yes

Example 4.3.4

/etc/samba/smb.conf

No

Yes

No

Example 4.3.5

/etc/samba/smb.conf

No

No

Yes

Example 4.3.6

/etc/samba/dommem.conf

No

Yes

Yes

Example 4.3.7

/etc/dhcpd.conf

Yes

No

No

Example 4.3.8

/etc/dhcpd.conf

No

Yes

No

Example 4.3.9

/etc/dhcpd.conf

No

No

Yes

Example 4.3.10

/etc/named.conf (part A)

Yes

No

No

Example 4.3.11

/etc/named.conf (part B)

Yes

No

No

Example 4.3.12

/etc/named.conf (part C)

Yes

No

No

Example 4.3.13

{VLN}/master/abmas.biz.hosts

Yes

No

No

Example 4.3.14

{VLN}/master/abmas.us.hosts

Yes

No

No

Example 4.3.15

/etc/named.conf (part A)

No

Yes

Yes

Example 4.3.16

/etc/named.conf (part B)

No

Yes

Yes

Example 15.4.1

{VLN}/localhost.zone

Yes

Yes

Yes

Example 15.4.2

{VLN}/127.0.0.zone

Yes

Yes

Yes

Example 15.4.3

{VLN}/root.hint

Yes

Yes

Yes


The abbreviation shown in this table as {VLN} refers to the directory location beginning with /var/lib/named.

4.3.2. Server Preparation: All Servers

The following steps apply to all servers. Follow each step carefully.

SERVER PREPARATION STEPS

1.

Using the UNIX/Linux system tools, set the name of the server as shown in the network topology diagram in Figure 4.1. For SUSE Linux products, the tool that permits this is called yast2; for Red Hat Linux products, you can use the netcfg tool. Verify that your hostname is correctly set by running:

root#   uname -n 

An alternate method to verify the hostname is:

root#   hostname -f 

2.

Edit your /etc/hosts file to include the primary names and addresses of all network interfaces that are on the host server. This is necessary so that during startup the system is able to resolve all its own names to the IP address prior to startup of the DNS server. You should check the startup order of your system. If the CUPS print server is started before the DNS server (named), you should also include an entry for the printers in the /etc/hosts file.

3.

All DNS name resolution should be handled locally. To ensure that the server is configured correctly to handle this, edit /etc/resolv.conf so it has the following content:

search abmas.us abmas.biz nameserver 127.0.0.1 

This instructs the name resolver function (when configured correctly) to ask the DNS server that is running locally to resolve names to addresses.

4.

Add the root user to the password backend:

root#  smbpasswd -a root New SMB password: XXXXXXXX Retype new SMB password: XXXXXXXX root# 

The root account is the UNIX equivalent of the Windows domain administrator. This account is essential in the regular maintenance of your Samba server. It must never be deleted. If for any reason the account is deleted, you may not be able to recreate this account without considerable trouble.

5.

Create the username map file to permit the root account to be called Administrator from the Windows network environment. To do this, create the file /etc/samba/smbusers with the following contents:

#### # User mapping file #### # File Format # ----------- # Unix_ID = Windows_ID # # Examples: # root = Administrator # janes = "Jane Smith" # jimbo = Jim Bones # # Note: If the name contains a space it must be double quoted. #       In the example above the name 'jimbo' will be mapped to Windows #       user names 'Jim' and 'Bones' because the space was not quoted. ####################################################################### root = Administrator #### # End of File #### 

6.

Configure all network-attached printers to have a fixed IP address.

7.

Create an entry in the DNS database on the server MASSIVE in both the forward lookup database for the zone abmas.biz.hosts and in the reverse lookup database for the network segment that the printer is located in. Example configuration files for similar zones were presented in Chapter 3, "Secure Office Networking", Example 3.3.12 and Example 3.3.11.

8.

Follow the instructions in the printer manufacturer's manuals to permit printing to port 9100. Use any other port the manufacturer specifies for direct mode, raw printing. This allows the CUPS spooler to print using raw mode protocols.

9.

Only on the server to which the printer is attached configure the CUPS Print Queues as follows:

root#   lpadmin -p printque -v socket://printer-name.abmas.biz:9100 -E 

This step creates the necessary print queue to use no assigned print filter. This is ideal for raw printing, that is, printing without use of filters. The name printque is the name you have assigned for the particular printer.

10.

Print queues may not be enabled at creation. Make certain that the queues you have just created are enabled by executing the following:

root#   /usr/bin/enable printque 

11.

Even though your print queue may be enabled, it is still possible that it does not accept print jobs. A print queue services incoming printing requests only when configured to do so. Ensure that your print queue is set to accept incoming jobs by executing the following command:

root#   /usr/bin/accept printque 

12.

This step, as well as the next one, may be omitted where CUPS version 1.1.18 or later is in use. Although it does no harm to follow it anyway, and may help to avoid time spent later trying to figure out why print jobs may be disappearing without a trace. Look at these two steps as insurance against lost time. Edit file /etc/cups/mime. convs to uncomment the line:

application/octet-stream     application/vnd.cups-raw     0     - 

13.

Edit the file /etc/cups/mime.types to uncomment the line:

application/octet-stream 

14.

Refer to the CUPS printing manual for instructions regarding how to configure CUPS so that print queues that reside on CUPS servers on remote networks route print jobs to the print server that owns that queue. The default setting on your CUPS server may automatically discover remotely installed printers and may permit this functionality without requiring specific configuration.

15.

As part of the roll-out program, you need to configure the application's server shares. This can be done once on the central server and may then be replicated using a tool such as rsync. Refer to the man page for rsync for details regarding use. The notes in Section 3.3.7 may help in your decisions to use an application server facility.

Note

Logon scripts that are run from a domain controller (PDC or BDC) are capable of using semi-intelligent processes to automap Windows client drives to an application server that is nearest to the client. This is considerably more difficult when a single PDC is used on a routed network. It can be done, but not as elegantly as you see in the next chapter.



4.3.3. Server-Specific Preparation

There are some steps that apply to particular server functionality only. Each step is critical to correct server operation. The following step-by-step installation guidance will assist you in working through the process of configuring the PDC and then both BDC's.

4.3.3.1 Configuration for Server: MASSIVE

The steps presented here attempt to implement Samba installation in a generic manner. While some steps are clearly specific to Linux, it should not be too difficult to apply them to your platform of choice.

PRIMARY DOMAIN CONTROLLER PREPARATION

1.

The host server acts as a router between the two internal network segments as well as for all Internet access. This necessitates that IP forwarding be enabled. This can be achieved by adding to the /etc/rc.d/boot.local an entry as follows:

echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward 

To ensure that your kernel is capable of IP forwarding during configuration, you may wish to execute that command manually also. This setting permits the Linux system to act as a router.

2.

This server is dual hosted (i.e., has two network interfaces) one goes to the Internet and the other to a local network that has a router that is the gateway to the remote networks. You must therefore configure the server with route table entries so that it can find machines on the remote networks. You can do this using the appropriate system tools for your Linux server or using static entries that you place in one of the system startup files. It is best to always use the tools that the operating system vendor provided. In the case of SUSE Linux, the best tool to do this is YaST (refer to SUSE Administration Manual); in the case of Red Hat, this is best done using the graphical system configuration tools (see the Red Hat documentation). An example of how this may be done manually is as follows:

root#   route add net 172.16.4.0 netmask 255.255.252.0 gw 172.16.0.128 root#   route add net 172.16.8.0 netmask 255.255.252.0 gw 172.16.0.128 

If you just execute these commands manually, the route table entries you have created are not persistent across system reboots. You may add these commands directly to the local startup files as follows: (SUSE) /etc/rc.d/boot.local, (Red Hat) /etc/rc.d/init.d/rc.local.

3.

The final step that must be completed is to edit the /etc/nsswitch.conf file. This file controls the operation of the various resolver libraries that are part of the Linux Glibc libraries. Edit this file so that it contains the following entries:

hosts:     files dns wins 

4.

Create and map Windows domain groups to UNIX groups. A sample script is provided in Example 4.3.17. Create a file containing this script. You called yours /etc/samba/initGrps.sh. Set this file so it can be executed and then execute the script. An example of the execution of this script as well as its validation are shown in Section 4.3.2, Step 5.

5.

For each user who needs to be given a Windows domain account, make an entry in the /etc/passwd file as well as in the Samba password backend. Use the system tool of your choice to create the UNIX system account, and use the Samba smbpasswd to create a domain user account. There are a number of tools for user management under UNIX, such as useradd, adduser, as well as a plethora of custom tools. With the tool of your choice, create a home directory for each user.

6.

Using the preferred tool for your UNIX system, add each user to the UNIX groups created previously as necessary. File system access control is based on UNIX group membership.

7.

Create the directory mount point for the disk subsystem that is to be mounted to provide data storage for company files, in this case, the mount point indicated in the smb.conf file is /data. Format the file system as required and mount the formatted file system partition using appropriate system tools.

8.

Create the top-level file storage directories for data and applications as follows:

root#   mkdir -p /data/{accounts,finsvcs,pidata} root#   mkdir -p /apps root#   chown -R root:root /data root#   chown -R root:root /apps root#   chown -R bjordan:accounts /data/accounts root#   chown -R bjordan:finsvcs /data/finsvcs root#   chown -R bjordan:finsvcs /data/pidata root#   chmod -R ug+rwxs,o-rwx /data root#   chmod -R ug+rwx,o+rx-w /apps 

Each department is responsible for creating its own directory structure within the departmental share. The directory root of the accounts share is /data/accounts. The directory root of the finsvcs share is /data/finsvcs. The /apps directory is the root of the apps share that provides the application server infrastructure.

9.

The smb.conf file specifies an infrastructure to support roaming profiles and network logon services. You can now create the file system infrastructure to provide the locations on disk that these services require. Adequate planning is essential because desktop profiles can grow to be quite large. For planning purposes, a minimum of 200 MB of storage should be allowed per user for profile storage. The following commands create the directory infrastructure needed:

root#   mkdir -p /var/spool/samba root#   mkdir -p /var/lib/samba/{netlogon/scripts,profiles} root#   chown -R root:root /var/spool/samba root#   chown -R root:root /var/lib/samba root#   chmod a+rwxt /var/spool/samba 

For each user account that is created on the system, the following commands should be executed:

root#   mkdir /var/lib/samba/profiles/'username' root#   chown 'username':users /var/lib/samba/profiles/'username' root#   chmod ug+wrx,o+rx,-w /var/lib/samba/profiles/'username' 

10.

Create a logon script. It is important that each line is correctly terminated with a carriage return and line-feed combination (i.e., DOS encoding). The following procedure works if the right tools (unxi2dos and dos2unix) are installed. First, create a file called /var/lib/samba/netlogon/scripts/logon.bat.unix with the following contents:

net time \\massive /set/yes net use h: /home 

Convert the UNIX file to a DOS file:

root#  dos2unix < /var/lib/samba/netlogon/scripts/logon.bat.unix \         > /var/lib/samba/netlogon/scripts/logon.bat 

11.

There is one preparatory step without which you cannot have a working Samba network environment. You must add an account for each network user. You can do this by executing the following steps for each user:

root#  useradd -m username root#  passwd username Changing password for username. New password: XXXXXXXX Re-enter new password: XXXXXXXX Password changed root#  smbpasswd -a username New SMB password: XXXXXXXX Retype new SMB password: XXXXXXXX Added user username. 

You do, of course, use a valid user login ID in place of username.

12.

Follow the processes shown in Section 4.3.4 to start all services.

13.

Your server is ready for validation testing. Do not proceed with the steps in Section 4.3.3.2 until after the operation of the server has been validated following the same methods as outlined in Chapter 3, "Secure Office Networking", Section 3.3.6.

4.3.3.2 Configuration Specific to Domain Member Servers: BLDG1, BLDG2

The following steps will guide you through the nuances of implementing BDCs for the broadcast isolated network segments. Remember that if the target installation platform is not Linux, it may be necessary to adapt some commands to the equivalent on the target platform.

BACKUP DOMAIN CONTROLLER CONFIGURATION STEPS

1.

The final step that must be completed is to edit the /etc/nsswitch.conf file. This file controls the operation of the various resolver libraries that are part of the Linux Glibc libraries. Edit this file so that it contains the following entries:

passwd:     files winbind group:      files winbind hosts:      files dns wins 

2.

Follow the steps outlined in Section 4.3.4 to start all services. Do not start Samba at this time. Samba is controlled by the process called smb.

3.

You must now attempt to join the domain member servers to the domain. The following instructions should be executed to effect this:

root#  net rpc join 

4.

You now start the Samba services by executing:

root#  service smb start 

5.

Your server is ready for validation testing. Do not proceed with the steps in Section 4.3.3.2 until after the operation of the server has been validated following the same methods as outlined in Section 3.3.6.

4.3.4. Process Startup Configuration

There are two essential steps to process startup configuration. A process must be configured so that it is automatically restarted each time the server is rebooted. This step involves use of the chkconfig tool that created appropriate symbolic links from the master daemon control file that is located in the /etc/rc.d directory to the /etc/rc'x'.d directories. Links are created so that when the system run-level is changed, the necessary start or kill script is run.

In the event that a service is provided not as a daemon but via the internetworking super daemon (inetd or xinetd), then the chkconfig tool makes the necessary entries in the /etc/xinetd.d directory and sends a hang-up (HUP) signal to the super daemon, thus forcing it to re-read its control files.

Last, each service must be started to permit system validation to proceed. The following steps are for a Red Hat Linux system, please adapt them to suit the target OS platform on which you are installing Samba.

PROCESS STARTUP CONFIGURATION STEPS

1.

Use the standard system tool to configure each service to restart automatically at every system reboot. For example,

Example 4.3.1. Server: MASSIVE (PDC), File: /etc/samba/smb.conf
# Global parameters  [global]         workgroup = MEGANET         netbios name = MASSIVE         interfaces = eth1, lo         bind interfaces only = Yes         passdb backend = tdbsam         smb ports = 139         add user script = /usr/sbin/useradd m '%u'         delete user script = /usr/sbin/userdel r '%u'         add group script = /usr/sbin/groupadd '%g'         delete group script = /usr/sbin/groupdel '%g'         add user to group script = /usr/sbin/usermod G '%g' '%u'         add machine script = /usr/sbin/useradd s /bin/false d /var/lib/nobody '%u'         preferred master = Yes         wins support = Yes         include = /etc/samba/dccommon.conf  [accounts]         comment = Accounting Files         path = /data/accounts         read only = No  [service]         comment = Financial Services Files         path = /data/service         read only = No  [pidata]         comment = Property Insurance Files         path = /data/pidata         read only = No 

root#   chkconfig dhpc on root#   chkconfig named on root#   chkconfig cups on root#   chkconfig smb on root#   chkconfig swat on 

2.

Now start each service to permit the system to be validated. Execute each of the following in the sequence shown:

root#   service dhcp restart root#   service named restart root#   service cups restart root#   service smb restart root#  service swat restart 

Example 4.3.2. Server: MASSIVE (PDC), File: /etc/samba/dc-common.conf
# Global parameters  [global]         shutdown script = /var/lib/samba/scripts/shutdown.sh         abort shutdown script = /sbin/shutdown c         logon script = scripts \ logon.bat         logon path = \%L\ profiles \%U         logon drive = X:         logon home = \%L\%U         domain logons = Yes         preferred master = Yes         include = /etc/samba/common.conf  [homes]         comment = Home Directories         valid users = %S         read only = No         browseable = No  [netlogon]         comment = Network Logon Service         path = /var/lib/samba/netlogon         guest ok = Yes         locking = No  [profiles]         comment = Profile Share         path = /var/lib/samba/profiles         read only = No         profile acls = Yes 

4.3.5. Windows Client Configuration

The procedure for desktop client configuration for the network in this chapter is similar to that used for the previous one. There are a few subtle changes that should be noted.

WINDOWS CLIENT CONFIGURATION STEPS

1.

Install MS Windows XP Professional. During installation, configure the client to use DHCP for TCP/IP protocol configuration. DHCP configures all Windows clients to use the WINS Server address that has been defined for the local subnet.

2.

Join the Windows domain MEGANET. Use the domain administrator username root and the SMB password you assigned to this account. A detailed step-by-step procedure for joining a Windows 200x/XP Professional client to a Windows domain is given in Chapter 15, "A Collection of Useful Tidbits", Section 15.1. Reboot the machine as prompted and then log on using the domain administrator account (root).

Example 4.3.3. Common Samba Configuration File: /etc/samba/common.conf
[global]         username map = /etc/samba/smbusers         log level = 1         syslog = 0         log file = /var/log/samba/%m         max log size = 50         smb ports = 139         name resolve order = wins bcast hosts         time server = Yes         printcap name = CUPS         show add printer wizard = No         shutdown script = /var/lib/samba/scripts/shutdown .sh         abort shutdown script = /sbin/shutdown c         utmp = Yes         map acl inherit = Yes         printing = cups         veto files = /*.eml/*.nws/*.{*}/         veto oplock files = /*.doc/*.xls/*.mdb/         include = # Share and Service Definitions are common to all servers [printers]         comment = SMB Print Spool         path = /var/spool/samba         guest ok = Yes         printable = Yes         use client driver = Yes         default devmode = Yes         browseable = No [apps]         comment = Application Files         path = /apps         admin users = bjordan         read only = No 

3.

Verify that the server called MEGANET is visible in My Network Places, that it is possible to connect to it and see the shares accounts, apps, and finsvcs, and that it is possible to open each share to reveal its contents.

4.

Create a drive mapping to the apps share on a server. At this time, it does not particularly matter which application server is used. It is necessary to manually set a persistent drive mapping to the local applications server on each workstation at the time of installation. This step is avoided by the improvements to the design of the network configuration in the next chapter.

5.

Perform an administrative installation of each application to be used. Select the options that you wish to use. Of course, you choose to run applications over the network, correct?

Example 4.3.4. Server: BLDG1 (Member), File: smb.conf
# Global parameters  [global]         workgroup = MEGANET         netbios name = BLDG1         include = /etc/samba/dommem.conf 

Example 4.3.5. Server: BLDG2 (Member), File: smb.conf
# Global parameters  [global]         workgroup = MEGANET         netbios name = BLDG2         include = /etc/samba/dommem.conf 

Example 4.3.6. Common Domain Member Include File: dom-mem.conf
# Global parameters  [global]         shutdown script = /var/lib/samba/scripts/shutdown .sh         abort shutdown script = /sbin/shutdown c         preferred master = Yes         wins server = 172.16.0.1         idmap uid = 1500020000         idmap gid = 1500020000         include = /etc/samba/common.conf 

6.

Now install all applications to be installed locally. Typical tools include Adobe Acrobat, NTP-based time synchronization software, drivers for specific local devices such as fingerprint scanners, and the like. Probably the most significant application to be locally installed is antivirus software.

7.

Now install all four printers onto the staging system. The printers you install include the accounting department HP LaserJet 6 and Minolta QMS Magicolor printers, and you also configure use of the identical printers that are located in the financial services department. Install printers on each machine using the following steps:

STEPS TO INSTALL PRINTER DRIVERS ON WINDOWS CLIENTS

  1. Click Start Add Printer+Next. Do not click Network printer. Ensure that Local printer is selected.

  2. Click Next. In the Manufacturer: panel, select HP. In the Printers: panel, select the printer called HP LaserJet 6. Click Next.

  3. In the Available ports: panel, select FILE:. Accept the default printer name by clicking Next. When asked, "Would you like to print a test page?", click No. Click Finish.

    Example 4.3.7. Server: MASSIVE, File: dhcpd.conf
    # Abmas Accounting Inc. default-lease-time 86400; max-lease-time 172800; default-lease-time 86400; ddns-updates on; ddns-update-style interim; option ntp-servers 172.16.0.1; option domain-name "abmas.biz"; option domain-name-servers 172.16.0.1, 172.16.4.1; option netbios-name-servers 172.16.0.1; option netbios-node-type 8; subnet 172.16.1.0 netmask 255.255.252.0 {         range dynamic-bootp 172.16.1.0 172.16.2.255;         option subnet-mask 255.255.252.0;         option routers 172.16.0.1, 172.16.0.128;         allow unknown-clients;    } subnet 172.16.4.0 netmask 255.255.252.0 {         range dynamic-bootp 172.16.7.0 172.16.7.254;         option subnet-mask 255.255.252.0;         option routers 172.16.4.128;         allow unknown-clients;    } subnet 172.16.8.0 netmask 255.255.252.0 {         range dynamic-bootp 172.16.11.0 172.16.11.254;         option subnet-mask 255.255.252.0;         option routers 172.16.4.128;         allow unknown-clients;    } subnet 127.0.0.0 netmask 255.0.0.0 {         } subnet 123.45.67.64 netmask 255.255.255.252 {         } 

  4. You may be prompted for the name of a file to print to. If so, close the dialog panel. Right-click HP LaserJet 6 In the Network panel, enter the name of the print queue on the Samba server as follows: \\BLDG1\hplj6a. Click OK+OK to complete the installation.

    Example 4.3.8. Server: BLDG1, File: dhcpd.conf
    # Abmas Accounting Inc. default-lease-time 86400; max-lease-time 172800; default-lease-time 86400; ddns-updates on; ddns-update-style ad-hoc; option ntp-servers 172.16.0.1; option domain-name "abmas.biz"; option domain-name-servers 172.16.0.1, 172.16.4.1; option netbios-name-servers 172.16.0.1; option netbios-node-type 8; subnet 172.16.1.0 netmask 255.255.252.0 {         range dynamic-bootp 172.16.3.0 172.16.3.255;         option subnet-mask 255.255.252.0;         option routers 172.16.0.1, 172.16.0.128;         allow unknown-clients;    } subnet 172.16.4.0 netmask 255.255.252.0 {         range dynamic-bootp 172.16.5.0 172.16.6.255;         option subnet-mask 255.255.252.0;         option routers 172.16.4.128;         allow unknown-clients;    } subnet 127.0.0.0 netmask 255.0.0.0 {         } 

  5. Repeat the printer installation steps above for both HP LaserJet 6 printers as well as for both QMS Magicolor laser printers. Remember to install all printers but to set the destination port for each to the server on the local network. For example, a workstation in the accounting group should have all printers directed at the server BLDG1. You may elect to point all desktop workstation configurations at the server called MASSIVE and then in your deployment procedures, it would be wise to document the need to redirect the printer configuration (as well as the applications server drive mapping) to the server on the network segment on which the workstation is to be located.

8.

When you are satisfied that the staging systems are complete, use the appropriate procedure to remove the client from the domain. Reboot the system, and then log on as the local administrator and clean out all temporary files stored on the system. Before shutting down, use the disk defragmentation tool so that the file system is in optimal condition before replication.

Example 4.3.9. Server: BLDG2, File: dhcpd.conf
# Abmas Accounting Inc. default-lease-time 86400; max-lease-time 172800; default-lease-time 86400; ddns-updates on; ddns-update-style interim; option ntp-servers 172.16.0.1; option domain-name "abmas.biz"; option domain-name-servers 172.16.0.1, 172.16.4.1; option netbios-name-servers 172.16.0.1; option netbios-node-type 8; subnet 172.16.8.0 netmask 255.255.252.0 {         range dynamic-bootp 172.16.9.0 172.16.10.255;         option subnet-mask 255.255.252.0;         option routers 172.16.8.128;         allow unknown-clients;    } subnet 127.0.0.0 netmask 255.0.0.0 {         } 

9.

Boot the workstation using the Norton (Symantec) Ghosting disk (or CD-ROM) and image the machine to a network share on the server.

10.

You may now replicate the image using the appropriate Norton Ghost procedure to the target machines. Make sure to use the procedure that ensures each machine has a unique Windows security identifier (SID). When the installation of the disk image is complete, boot the PC.

11.

Log onto the machine as the local Administrator (the only option), and join the machine to the domain following the procedure set out in Chapter 15, "A Collection of Useful Tidbits", Section 15.1. You must now set the persistent drive mapping to the applications server that the user is to use. The system is now ready for the user to log on, provided you have created a network logon account for that user, of course.

12.

Instruct all users to log onto the workstation using their assigned username and password.

4.3.6. Key Points Learned

The network you have just deployed has been a valuable exercise in forced constraint. You have deployed a network that works well, although you may soon start to see performance problems, at which time the modifications demonstrated in Chapter 5, "Making Happy Users" bring the network to life. The following key learning points were experienced:

  • The power of using smb.conf include files

  • Use of a single PDC over a routed network

  • Joining a Samba-3 domain member server to a Samba-3 domain

  • Configuration of winbind to use domain users and groups for Samba access to resources on the domain member servers

  • The introduction of roaming profiles



    Samba-3 by Example. Practical Exercises to Successful Deployment
    Samba-3 by Example: Practical Exercises to Successful Deployment (2nd Edition)
    ISBN: 013188221X
    EAN: 2147483647
    Year: 2005
    Pages: 142

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