Scenario 1-1: Installing a Cisco Catalyst Switch onto the Network


The first step in successfully integrating Cisco Catalyst switches into the network is to install the switch and configure the switch so that it can operate correctly on the network. In this scenario you learn how to prepare Cisco Catalyst switches for operation on the network. It is important to implement a well-planned switch installation so that you can then attach devices and configure more advanced features with the knowledge that you have a stable platform to build upon. This scenario introduces fundamental configuration tasks of Cisco Catalyst switches that you should know and understand intimately.

Figure 1-11 illustrates the topology used for this scenario.

Figure 1-11. Scenario 1-1 Topology


In Figure 1-11, Switch-A is a Catalyst 3550 switch, which enables you to learn how to prepare and install Cisco IOS-based switches. Switch-B is a Catalyst 4006 switch, which enables you to how to prepare and install CatOS-based switches. Notice that no devices are actually connected to either switch. In subsequent scenarios, you learn how to configure connectivity for end devices.

Configuration Tasks

In this scenario, you learn how to perform the following configuration tasks:

  • Installing the switch

  • Gaining initial management access

  • Configuring system identity

  • Configure management access

Installing the Switch

Before installing Cisco Catalyst switches onto the network, you must ensure that you have the appropriate hardware required for the switch to operate, as well as other physical requirements such as power, rack space, and the appropriate environmental conditions. On fixed configuration switches, such as the Catalyst 3550, the only hardware you might need to ensure you have are optional gigabit Ethernet GBICs. All other hardware is included with the switch. On chassis-based switches, however, you must ensure you have all the appropriate hardware to run your switch modules correctly. Obviously, at least one Supervisor is required, and you probably need a line card to connect devices to. However, of particular importance on chassis-based switches is power; you must have the appropriate power supplies installed to meet the power requirements of each of the modules installed, and you must understand the requirements for redundant power if this is desired.

Table 1-9 lists the AC power requirements for the Catalyst 4000/4500 switches. For the Catalyst 6000/6500 switches, see www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/lan/cat6000/sw_6_2/confg_gd/admin.htm#46335.

Table 1-9. Minimum Power Requirements for Cisco Catalyst Chassis-based Switches

Platform

Configuration

Minimum Power Supply Requirements

 

RPS (n+1)

Inline Power[1]

 

Catalyst 4000

No

No

2 x 400W (WS-X4008)

 

Yes

No

3 x 400W (WS-X4008)

 

No

Yes

Provides up to 240 inline ports

2 x 400W (WS-X4008)

1 x 2100W DC External Power Shelf (WS-P4603-2PSU)

1 x DC Power Entry Module (WS-X4095-PEM)

 

Yes

Yes

Provides up to 240 inline ports

3 x 400W (WS-X4008)

1 x 2100W DC External Power Shelf (WS-P4603-2PSU)

1 x 1050W Auxiliary PSU for External Power Shelf (WS-X4608)

1 x DC Power Entry Module (WS-X4095-PEM)

Catalyst 4500[2]

No

No

1 x 1000W (PWR-C45-1000AC)

 

Yes

No

2 x 1000W (PWR-C45-1000AC)

 

No

Yes

Up to 126[3] inline ports:

1 x 1300W

Up to 211 inline ports:

2 x 1300W in combined mode

Up to 222 inline ports:

1 x 2800W

Up to 240 inline ports:

2 x 2800W in combined mode

 

Yes

Yes

Up to 126 inline ports:

2 x 1300W in redundant mode

Up to 222 inline ports:

2 x 2800W in redundant mode


[1] Assumes each inline device requires 6.3W of power

[2] The Catalyst 4503 supports a maximum of 96 inline powered ports only, as only two slots are available for inline-powered Ethernet modules

[3] The Catalyst 4507R with dual Supervisor 4 engines only supports up to 111 inline devices with a single 1300W power supply

As you can see in Table 1-9, the power requirements for chassis-based switches vary, depending on if you require a redundant power supply and/or if you require inline-powered ports.

NOTE

For more information on inline power requirements for the Catalyst 4000, see www.cisco.com/warp/public/cc/pd/si/casi/ca4000/prodlit/c4k2_ds.htm. For more information on inline power requirements for the Catalyst 4500, see www.cisco.com/warp/public/cc/pd/si/casi/ps4324/prodlit/inpow_an.htm.


Assuming power, rack space, and environmental requirements have been met, in terms of hardware components, if you have a fixed configuration switch (e.g., Switch-A, which is a Catalyst 3550 switch), then the switch will work out of the box without requiring any other components. If you have a chassis-based switch, the following components are required to install the switch and begin configuration:

  • Switch chassis Provides slots for installing power supplies, supervisor engines, and line cards.

  • Power supplies All chassis-based switches require at least one power supply. Some switches (e.g., the Catalyst 4000 series) required at least two power supplies to properly power all line cards in the switch.

  • Supervisor engine Provides the switch processor and switching engine, which allows you to configure the switch and enable LAN switching between devices attached to line cards.

  • One or more line cards Provide LAN connectivity for end devices.

In this scenario, Switch-B is a chassis-based Catalyst 4006 switch, and it is assumed the following components are used:

  • 1 x Catalyst 4006 chassis (WS-C4006)

  • 1 x Supervisor 2 Engine (WS-X4013)

  • 2 x AC power supplies (WS-X4008)

  • 1 x 48-port 10/100 line card (WS-X4148-RJ)

Gaining Initial Management Access

After ensuring all of the physical components that make up the switch are installed and then physically installing the switch into the rack, the next task is to power on the switch, gain initial management access, and verify that the system has come up correctly and that the system software and hardware configuration is correct. This consists of the following tasks:

  • Establishing a console connection

  • Verifying system bootup

  • Gaining privileged mode access

  • Verifying system configuration

Establishing a Console Connection

On all Cisco Catalyst switches, a console port is provided, which allows serial access to a command-line interface (CLI) shell that allows you to manage the switch. To gain management access via the console port, the following components are required:

  • A PC with a male DB-9 or DB-25 serial port

  • A console cable with appropriate adapters that enables interconnection of the PC serial port and console port

  • Terminal emulation software such as HyperTerminal

All Cisco Catalyst switches ship with the appropriate cables and adapters that allow you to connect the console port to a male DB-9 serial port on a PC or laptop. Newer Cisco Catalyst switches provide an RJ-45 physical interface for console access. However, older switches might provide a DB-9 or DB-25 interface. In this scenario, both the Catalyst 3550 and Supervisor 2 engine on the Catalyst 4006 provide an RJ-45 console port.

After physically connecting your PC or laptop to the console port of the switch, you must next start your terminal emulation application and establish a connection to the console port. All Cisco Catalyst switches provide console port access using the following connection parameters:

  • Connection speed = 9600 bps

  • Data bits = 8

  • Parity = None

  • Stop bits = 1

  • Flow control = None

Figure 1-12 demonstrates configuring HyperTerminal with the appropriate serial port settings to gain management access via the console port.

Figure 1-12. HyperTerminal Serial Connection Settings


On HyperTerminal, the default speed setting is 2400 bps, with hardware-based flow control enabled, which must be modified to ensure a console connection can be established.

Verifying System Bootup

After establishing a console connection, your terminal emulation window just looks blank, because at this stage you have not powered on the switch. After powering on the switch, you should see the switch begin its boot sequence, which is important to monitor to ensure the switch boots correctly. Example 1-1 demonstrates the switch bootup sequence on Switch-A, which is a Cisco IOS-based Catalyst 3550 switch.

Example 1-1. System Bootup on the Catalyst 3550 Switch

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 Base ethernet MAC Address: 00:09:b7:bb:8d:08 Xmodem file system is available. The password-recovery mechanism is enabled. Initializing Flash... flashfs[0]: 20 files, 3 directories flashfs[0]: 0 orphaned files, 0 orphaned directories flashfs[0]: Total bytes: 15998976 flashfs[0]: Bytes used: 6593024 flashfs[0]: Bytes available: 9405952 flashfs[0]: flashfs fsck took 15 seconds. ...done Initializing Flash. Boot Sector Filesystem (bs:) installed, fsid: 3 Loading "flash:c3550-i5k2l2q3-mz.121-13.EA1a/c3550-i5k2l2q3-mz.121-13.EA1a.bin" ...############################################################################ ############################################################################### ############################################################################### ############################################################################### ############################################################################### ############################################################################### ########################################################### File "flash:c3550-i5k2l2q3-mz.121-13.EA1a/c3550-i5k2l2q3-mz.121-13.EA1a.bin" uncompressed  and installed, entry point: 0x3000 executing...               Restricted Rights Legend Use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph  of the Commercial Computer Software - Restricted Rights clause at FAR sec. 52.227-19 and subparagraph  (1) (ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software clause at DFARS sec. 252.227-7013.            cisco Systems, Inc.            170 West Tasman Drive            San Jose, California 95134-1706 Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software IOS (tm) C3550 Software (C3550-I5K2L2Q3-M), Version 12.1(13)EA1a,     RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1) Copyright  1986-2003 by cisco Systems, Inc. Compiled Tue 25-Mar-03 23:56 by yenanh Image text-base: 0x00003000, data-base: 0x008BA914 Initializing flashfs... flashfs[1]: 20 files, 3 directories flashfs[1]: 0 orphaned files, 0 orphaned directories flashfs[1]: Total bytes: 15998976 flashfs[1]: Bytes used: 6593024 flashfs[1]: Bytes available: 9405952 flashfs[1]: flashfs fsck took 8 seconds. flashfs[1]: Initialization complete. ...done Initializing flashfs. POST: CPU Buffer Tests : Begin POST: CPU Buffer Tests : End, Status Passed POST: CPU Interface Tests : Begin POST: CPU Interface Tests : End, Status Passed POST: Switch Core Tests : Begin POST: Switch Core Tests : End, Status Passed POST: CPU Interface 2nd Stage Tests : Begin POST: CPU Interface 2nd Stage Tests : End, Status Passed POST: CAM Subsystem Tests : Begin POST: CAM Subsystem Tests : End, Status Passed POST: Ethernet Controller Tests : Begin POST: Ethernet Controller Tests : End, Status Passed POST: Loopback Tests : Begin POST: Loopback Tests : End, Status Passed This product contains cryptographic features and is subject to United States and local country laws governing import, export, transfer and use. Delivery of Cisco cryptographic products does not imply third-party authority to import, export, distribute or use encryption. Importers, exporters, distributors and users are responsible for compliance with U.S. and local country laws. By using this product you agree to comply with applicable laws and regulations. If you are unable to comply with U.S. and local laws, return this product immediately. A summary of U.S. laws governing Cisco cryptographic products may be found at: http://www.cisco.com/wwl/export/crypto/tool/stqrg.html If you require further assistance please contact us by sending email to export@cisco.com. cisco WS-C3550-24 (PowerPC) processor (revision C0) with 65526K/8192K     bytes of memory. Processor board ID CAT0620X0HV Last reset from warm-reset Bridging software. Running Layer2/3 Switching Image Ethernet-controller 1 has 12 Fast Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces Ethernet-controller 2 has 12 Fast Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces Ethernet-controller 3 has 1 Gigabit Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface Ethernet-controller 4 has 1 Gigabit Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface 24 FastEthernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s) 2 Gigabit Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s) The password-recovery mechanism is enabled. 384K bytes of flash-simulated non-volatile configuration memory. Base ethernet MAC Address: 00:09:B7:BB:8D:08 Motherboard assembly number: 73-5700-99 Power supply part number: 34-0966-02 Motherboard serial number: CAT062843JA Power supply serial number: LIT0636005A Model revision number: C0 Motherboard revision number: B0 Model number: WS-C3550-24-EMI System serial number: CAT0620Y1JJ Press RETURN to get started! 00:00:34: %SPANTREE-5-EXTENDED_SYSID: Extended SysId enabled for type vlan 00:00:36: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from memory by console 00:00:36: %SYS-5-RESTART: System restarted -- Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software IOS (tm) C3550 Software (C3550-I5K2L2Q3-M), Version 12.1(13)EA1a,     RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1) Copyright  1986-2003 by cisco Systems, Inc. Compiled Tue 25-Mar-03 23:56 by yenanh Switch> 

In Example 1-1, the following processes occur during the boot process:

  • Flash file system is initialized; an operating system image is found and is loaded.

  • The operating system performs a series of Power-On Self-Test (POST) tests, ensuring system hardware is functioning correctly. In Example 1-1, notice that all POST tests pass, which indicates all hardware is functional.

  • The operating system provides an indication as to the current interfaces installed on the system. This should match the physical interface configuration of the switch.

  • After successful bootup, the Switch> prompt is provided, indicating management access via the CLI is available.

Example 1-2 demonstrates the switch bootup sequence on Switch-B, which is a CatOS-based Catalyst 4006 switch.

Example 1-2. System Bootup on the Catalyst 4006 Switch
 0:00.574327: Please set IPAddr variable 0:00.574909: Please set Netmask variable 0:00.575267: Please set Broadcast variable 0:00.575633: No gateway has been specified 0:00.576177: Network is not configured WS-X4013 bootrom version 6.1(4), built on 2001.07.30 14:43:26 H/W Revisions: Meteor: 4 Comet: 8 Board: 2 Supervisor MAC addresses: 00:10:7b:f7:2f:00 through 00:10:7b:f7:32:ff     (1024 addresses) Installed memory: 64 MB Testing LEDs.... done! The system will autoboot in 5 seconds. Type control-C to prevent autobooting. rommon 1 > The system will now begin autobooting. Autobooting image: "bootflash:cat4000-k8.7-6-1.bin" ................................................................................ ................................................................. ################################ Starting Off-line Diagnostics Mapping in TempFs Board type is WS-X4013 DiagBootMode value is "post" Loading diagnostics... Power-on-self-test for Module 1: WS-X4013 Status: (. = Pass, F = Fail) processor: . cpu sdram: . temperature sensor: . enet console port: . nvram: . switch sram: . switch registers: . switch port 0: . switch port 1: . switch port 2: . switch port 3: .       switch port 4: . switch port 5: . switch port 6: . switch port 7: . switch port 8: . switch port 9: . switch port 10: . switch port 11: . switch bandwidth: . Module 1 Passed Power-on-self-test for Module 2: WS-X4148 Port status: (. = Pass, F = Fail) 1: . 2: . 3: . 4: . 5: . 6: . 7: . 8: . 9: . 10: . 11: . 12: . 13: . 14: . 15: . 16: . 17: . 18: . 19: . 20: . 21: . 22: . 23: . 24: . 25: . 26: . 27: . 28: . 29: . 30: . 31: . 32: . 33: . 34: . 35: . 36: . 37: . 38: . 39: . 40: . 41: . 42: . 43: . 44: . 45: . 46: . 47: . 48: . Module 2 Passed Exiting Off-line Diagnostics IP address for Catalyst not configured BOOTP/DHCP will commence after the ports are online Ports are coming online ... Cisco Systems, Inc. Console Enter password: 

In Example 1-2, a similar sequence of events as Example 1-1 occurs, with the switch first loading and operating system from Flash, performing a series of successful POST tests on each module in the switch, and then providing an Enter password: prompt, which indicates the switch has successfully booted and initial management access is available.

Gaining Privileged Mode Access

After system bootup is complete, you should gain initial management access, which allows you to configure, manage, and monitor the switch.

NOTE

Cisco refers to the management access provided via CLI as EXEC access.


On Cisco IOS and CatOS, management access (EXEC access) is provided at two levels by default:

  • User mode Provides limited access to monitoring commands (show commands) and does not allow any configuration commands to be executed.

  • Privilege mode (also known as enable mode) Provides full access to all configuration, management and monitoring commands available.

The default levels of EXEC access provided vary, depending on whether or not you are configuring a Cisco IOS-based switch or a CatOS-based switch. On Cisco IOS, any access via the console is granted user mode access by default, which is indicated by the Switch> prompt (see Example 1-1). On CatOS, you must provide a password to gain user mode access via the console, which is indicated by the Enter password: prompt (see Example 1-2).

After gaining user mode access, you can then gain privileged mode access by executing the enable command. Each level of EXEC access requires a separate password to gain access; however, by default blank passwords are used to gain access.

Example 1-3 demonstrates gaining privileged level access to Switch-A.

Example 1-3. Gaining Privileged Level Access on Cisco IOS
 Switch> enable Switch# 

In Example 1-3, user mode access is already granted by default via the console; hence, the enable command needs to be executed only to gain privilege mode access. Notice that privileged mode access is granted immediately, without any prompt for password, as by default no password is required for privileged mode access. The # portion of the Switch# prompt indicates that the current EXEC session has privileged mode access, whereas the > portion of the Switch> prompt indicates the current EXEC session has user mode access.

Example 1-4 demonstrates gaining privileged EXEC access to Switch-B.

Example 1-4. Gaining Privileged Level Access on CatOS
 Cisco Systems, Inc. Console Enter password:  Console> enable Enter password:  Console> (enable) 

In Example 1-4, a blank password is required to gain user mode access, after which the enable command is executed to gain privileged mode access. Notice that unlike Cisco IOS, CatOS prompts you for a password to gain privileged mode access, even though the default password is blank. The (enable) portion of the Console> (enable) prompt indicates that the current EXEC session has privileged mode accessif only the Console> prompt is displayed, the current EXEC session only has user mode access.

Verifying System Configuration

After gaining privileged mode access, you should next verify the system hardware and software configuration is correct. Although system hardware is tested during system bootup, you should also verify the operating system can see all switch hardware after system bootup. As with any operating system, various versions of operating systems exist on Cisco Catalyst switches, which contain various levels of features depending on the version of operating system software installed. Ensuring the appropriate version of operating system software is installed is important, so that you can maintain the same versions of operating system software throughout the network, as well as configure the features required for your network.

To verify system hardware and software on Cisco IOS, you can use the show version command, which displays hardware and software versions and other information, as demonstrated in Example 1-5.

Example 1-5. Using the show version Command on Cisco IOS
 Switch# show version Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software IOS (tm) C3550 Software (C3550-I5K2L2Q3-M), Version 12.1(13)EA1a,     RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1) Copyright  1986-2003 by cisco Systems, Inc. Compiled Tue 25-Mar-03 23:56 by yenanh Image text-base: 0x00003000, data-base: 0x008BA914 ROM: Bootstrap program is C3550 boot loader Switch uptime is 51 minutes System returned to ROM by power-on System image file is "flash:c3550-i5k2l2q3-mz.121-13.EA1a/c3550-i5k2l2q3-mz.121-13.EA1a.bin" This product contains cryptographic features and is subject to United States and local country laws governing import, export, transfer and use. Delivery of Cisco cryptographic products does not imply third-party authority to import, export, distribute or use encryption. Importers, exporters, distributors and users are responsible for compliance with U.S. and local country laws. By using this product you agree to comply with applicable laws and regulations. If you are unable to comply with U.S. and local laws, return this product immediately. A summary of U.S. laws governing Cisco cryptographic products may be found at: http://www.cisco.com/wwl/export/crypto/tool/stqrg.html If you require further assistance please contact us by sending email to export@cisco.com. cisco WS-C3550-24 (PowerPC) processor (revision C0) with 65526K/8192K   bytes of memory. Processor board ID CAT0620X0HV Last reset from warm-reset Bridging software. Running Layer2/3 Switching Image Ethernet-controller 1 has 12 Fast Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces Ethernet-controller 2 has 12 Fast Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces Ethernet-controller 3 has 1 Gigabit Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface Ethernet-controller 4 has 1 Gigabit Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface 24 FastEthernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s) 2 Gigabit Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s) The password-recovery mechanism is enabled. 384K bytes of flash-simulated non-volatile configuration memory. Base ethernet MAC Address: 00:09:B7:BB:8D:08 Motherboard assembly number: 73-5700-99 Power supply part number: 34-0966-02 Motherboard serial number: CAT062843JA Power supply serial number: LIT0636005A Model revision number: C0 Motherboard revision number: B0 Model number: WS-C3550-24-EMI System serial number: CAT0620Y1JJ 

In Example 1-5, the shaded lines indicate operating system software version, hardware interfaces recognized by the system, serial number information, and a lot of other information about the system.

To verify system hardware on CatOS, you can use the show module command, which lists the various hardware modules installed in chassis-based CatOS switches. You can also use show version command to display hardware and software versions and other information, as demonstrated in Example 1-6.

Example 1-6. Verifying Hardware and Software on CatOS
 Console> (enable) show module Mod Slot Ports Module-Type               Model               Sub Status --- ---- ----- ------------------------- ------------------- --- -------- 1   1    2     Supervisor 2             WS-X4013            no  ok 2   1    48    10/100 Ethernet           WS-X4148            no  ok Mod Module-Name          Serial-Num --- -------------------- -------------------- 1                        JAB05310GME 2                        JAB030200QX Mod MAC-Address(es)                        Hw     Fw         Sw --- -------------------------------------- ------ ---------- ----------------- 1   00-30-24-48-d4-00 to 00-30-24-48-d7-ff 2.0    6.1(4)     7.6(1) 2   00-30-24-48-d7-9e to 00-30-24-48-d7-fd 2.0 Console> (enable) show version WS-C4006 Software, Version NmpSW: 7.6(1) Copyright  1995-2003 by Cisco Systems, Inc. NMP S/W compiled on Apr 16 2003, 18:56:05 GSP S/W compiled on Apr 16 2003, 16:56:33 System Bootstrap Version: 6.1(4) Hardware Version: 3.2  Model: WS-C4006  Serial #: FOX052202RB Mod Port Model              Serial #              Versions --- ---- ------------------ -------------------- ------------------------------- 1   2    WS-X4013           JAB05310GME          Hw : 3.2                                                  Gsp: 7.6(1.0)                                                  Nmp: 7.6(1) 2   48   WS-X4148   JAB030200QX          Hw : 1.0        DRAM                    FLASH                   NVRAM Module Total   Used    Free    Total   Used    Free    Total Used  Free ------ ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ------- ----- ----- ----- 1       65536K  36714K  28822K  16384K 4458K   11926K  480K  245K  235K Uptime is 0 day, 3 hours, 0 minute 

In Example 1-6, the show module command provides information specific to each module installed in the switch. You can see that the switch currently recognizes a Supervisor 2 module installed in module 1, and a 48-port module installed in module 2. The Status column indicates that each module is currently operational, as indicated by the value ok. The show version command also provides hardware and software information. The first line of the shaded output indicates the operating system version, while the second line indicates the read-only memory (ROM) software version used to boot the switch. The last shaded line indicates total system memory (64 MB) and Flash (16 MB) and also indicates current memory/Flash usage.

Configuring System Identity

After installing a Cisco Catalyst switch, gaining initial management access, and verifying the system configuration, you are ready to begin configuring the switch. Configuring a switch for operation on the network might comprise many different configuration tasks specific to your environment; however, several base configuration tasks most administrators will perform, which include the following:

  • Configuring host name

  • Saving and verifying your configuration

Configuring a Host Name

Configuring a host name for a switch is perhaps the most fundamental configuration task, because it enables you to uniquely identify a switch in the network.

Before configuring host name information, it is important to understand how you actually perform configuration on Cisco Catalyst switches. On Cisco IOS, configuration is provided via configuration modes, which are modes that are accessible via privileged mode access. A base configuration mode called global configuration mode provides the ability to configure settings that are applied globally to the switch. Other configuration modes exist for configuring specific components and features of the switch. To access any configuration mode on Cisco IOS, you must first access global configuration mode, which is performed using the configure terminal command via privileged mode access. Example 1-7 demonstrates accessing global configuration mode on a Cisco IOS switch.

Example 1-7. Accessing Global Configuration Mode
 Switch# configure ?   memory             Configure from NV memory   network            Configure from a TFTP network host   overwrite-network  Overwrite NV memory from TFTP network host   terminal           Configure from the terminal Switch# configure terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z. Switch(config)# 

In Example 1-7, the configure ? command is first executed, which provides online help for the various parameters that you can configure with the configure command. Cisco IOS includes online help as indicated in Example 1-7 for all commands, which can simply be accessed by using the ? character. Notice that you can configure the switch using four different commands:

  • configure memory Loads the startup configuration saved in nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM) to the current configuration.

  • configure network Allows the current configuration to be modified by loading configuration commands via the network from a file located on a remote Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server.

  • configure overwrite-network Allows the startup configuration in NVRAM to be overwritten by loading a configuration file via a remote Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server.

  • configure terminal Allows an administrator to configure the switch using terminal (CLI) based access to the switch via an interface such as the console port or via Telnet access.

In Example 1-7, the configure terminal command is executed to allow configuration via the console port. Notice that the switch prompt changes to Switch(config)#, which indicates the switch is currently operating in global configuration mode and accepts global configuration commands. Once in global configuration mode, you can begin configuring the switch. To configure a host name on a Cisco IOS switch, you use the hostname global configuration command, as demonstrated in Example 1-8.

Example 1-8. Configuring a Host Name on Cisco IOS
 Switch(config)# hostname ? WORD  This system's network name Switch(config)# hostname Switch-A ? <cr> Switch(config)# hostname Switch-A  Switch-A(config)# exit Switch-A# 

In Example 1-8, the hostname ? command is executed to determine the parameters that the command requires. Notice that Cisco IOS indicates a WORD is required that defines the host name. A WORD is essentially a free-text string that is used to describe some parameter on the switch, such as the switch host name. Next, the host name is configured as Switch-A, with another ? character being used to see if any other parameters must be configured. Cisco IOS indicates that a carriage return is required (<cr>), which means the configuration of the command is complete. This means the full command to configure the host name is hostname Switch-A. After this command is executed, notice that the switch name in the command prompt is modified appropriately. Finally, notice that the exit command is used to exit global configuration mode and return to privileged mode access. The exit command can be used within any configuration mode on Cisco IOS to return to the previous mode.

On CatOS, all configuration is performed from privileged mode access, with no concept of configuration modes. All configuration commands begin predominantly with the set keyword, and the clear keyword is also used to reset some configuration parameters. To configure the host name of a CatOS-based switch, the set system name command is used, as demonstrated in Example 1-9.

Example 1-9. Configuring the Host Name on CatOS
 Console> (enable) set system ? Set system commands: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- set system baud              Set system console port baud rate set system contact           Set system contact set system help              Show this message set system location          Set system location set system modem             Set system modem control (enable/disable) set system name              Set system name Console> (enable) set system name ?   <name_string>              Name for the system   <cr> Console> (enable) set system name Switch-B System name set. Switch-B> (enable) 

In Example 1-9, notice that you can use the ? character to provide a similar online help mechanism as provided on Cisco IOS. After executing the set system name Switch-B command, notice that the prompt is changed to include the system name.

Saving and Verifying Your Configuration

On Cisco IOS, any configuration changes made are made to a running configuration file, which is stored in memory and erased if the switch is rebooted or shut down. To ensure any configuration changes you have made are saved permanently, you must explicitly save the running configuration file to the startup configuration file, which is a file stored in nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM) that is read by the switch upon switch bootup. To save the current running configuration to the startup configuration file, you use the copy running-config startup-config command, as demonstrated in Example 1-10.

Example 1-10. Configuring a Host Name on Cisco IOS
 Switch-A# copy running-config starup-config Destination filename [startup-config]?  Building configuration... [OK] Switch-A# show running-config Building configuration... Current configuration : 1475 bytes ! version 12.1 no service pad service timestamps debug uptime service timestamps log uptime no service password-encryption ! hostname Switch-A ! ip subnet-zero ! spanning-tree mode pvst spanning-tree extend system-id ! interface FastEthernet0/1  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/2  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/3  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/4  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/5  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/6  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/7  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/8  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/9  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/10  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/11  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/12  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/13  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/14  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/15  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/16  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/17  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/18  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/19  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/20  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/21  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/22  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/23  no ip address ! interface FastEthernet0/24  no ip address ! interface GigabitEthernet0/1  no ip address ! interface GigabitEthernet0/2  no ip address ! interface Vlan1  no ip address  shutdown ! ip classless ip http server ! line con 0 line vty 5 15 ! end 

In Example 1-10, after the running configuration file is saved to the startup configuration file, the show running-config command is executed, which displays the current configuration stored in memory. Notice the highlighted command hostname Switch-A, which you configured in Example 1-8. All other commands are default settings. You can also use the show startup-config command to view the startup configuration file.

NOTE

You can use the copy startup-config running-config command to copy the startup configuration to the current running configuration; however, be aware that this command is additive, in that any settings currently present in the running configuration file that are not present in the startup configuration file are still maintained. This is unlike the copy running-config startup-config command, where the existing startup configuration file is first erased and then replaced with the running configuration file.


On CatOS, all configuration changes are automatically saved, meaning you don't have to explicitly save your configurations. To verify your configuration, you can use the show config command, as demonstrated in Example 1-11.

Example 1-11. Verifying Configuration on CatOS
 Switch-B> (enable) show config This command shows non-default configurations only. Use 'show config all' to show both default and non-default configurations. ............... .. begin ! # ***** NON-DEFAULT CONFIGURATION ***** ! #time: Wed Mar 3 1993, 02:34:54 ! #version 7.6(1) ! #system web interface version(s) ! #system set system name  Switch-B ! #frame distribution method set port channel all distribution mac both ! #ip set interface sl0 down set interface me1 down set ip alias default         0.0.0.0 ! #set boot command set boot config-register 0x10f set boot system flash bootflash:cat4000-k8.7-6-1.bin ! #multicast filter set igmp filter disable ! #module 1 : 2-port Switching Supervisor ! #module 2 : 48-port 10/100 Ethernet end 

In Example 1-11, the show config command is used to display all non-default configuration settings. You can use the show config all command to view all configuration settings; however, the output of this command is very long, limiting the usefulness of this command if you are trying to extract specific configuration information. You can see highlighted command set system name Switch-B, which you configured in Example 1-9. All other commands are default settings.




CCNP Self-Study CCNP Practical Studies. Switching
CCNP(R) Practical Studies: Switching (CCNP Self-Study)
ISBN: 1587200600
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2002
Pages: 135
Authors: Justin Menga

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