Part II: Multilayer Configuration


The following are the tasks you are required to complete in this part of the Self-Study Lab:

  • Core layer configuration

  • Distribution and access layer configuration

  • Routing and multicast routing configuration

NOTE

A detailed solution to this part of the Self-Study Lab is in Appendix B.


Core Layer Configuration

Step 1.

To avoid any IP addressing conflicts with Router-A while you convert the network, disconnect Router-A from Switch-B.

Step 2.

The new multilayer topology has split the Layer 2 domain into smaller pieces. Ensure that Switch-A and Switch-B are configured appropriately to ensure the VTP, VLAN, and spanning-tree parameters configured in the first lab are maintained in the new core Layer 2 topology that connects servers.

Step 3.

Configure Switch-A and Switch-B as Layer 3 switches using the IP addressing indicated in Figure 11-2. Assume a 24-bit subnet mask for all subnets. Switch-B has an Multilayer Switch Feature Card (MSFC) installed that provides Layer 3 switching and is to be named "MSFC-B." Ensure that physical interfaces are configured as routed interfaces wherever possible, instead of using switch virtual interfaces (SVIs). If required, you are permitted to create new VLANs.

Step 4.

Ensure that devices connected to VLANs 100 and 101 can still connect to the rest of the network without reconfiguration of the IP addressing parameters on any edge device in these VLANs. Traffic for VLAN 100 should be routed through Switch-A and traffic for VLAN 101 should be routed through MSFC-B. However, should either of the routing engines on either core switch fail, the remaining working routing engine should take over.

Distribution and Access Layer Configuration

Step 1.

The new multilayer topology has split the Layer 2 domain into smaller pieces. Ensure that Switch-C, Switch-D, Switch-E, and Switch-F are configured appropriately to ensure the VTP, VLAN, and spanning-tree parameters configured in the first lab are maintained in the new Layer 2 topology. You should configure all switches to belong to the same VTP domain.

Step 2.

Configure Switch-C and Switch-D as Layer 3 switches using the IP addressing shown in Figure 11-2. Ensure that physical interfaces are configured as routed interfaces wherever possible, instead of using SVIs. If required, you are permitted to create new VLANs.

Step 3.

Configure the network so that devices connected to VLANs 200, 201, and 202 can still connect to the rest of the network without reconfiguration of the IP addressing parameters on any edge device in these VLANs. You must ensure that edge devices can still connect to the rest of the network within 5 seconds after the failure of either Switch-C or Switch-D. The routed traffic load should be shared for even and odd VLANs by Switch-C and Switch-D, respectively.

Routing and Multicast Routing Configuration

Step 1.

Configure Router-A as indicated in Figure 11-2. The FastEthernet0/0 interface should now be configured as a non-trunk port with a single IP address configured, as shown in Figure 11-2. Once complete, reconnect Router-A to Switch-B.

Step 2.

Ensure that all switches can be managed using the 192.168.10.x addressing used in Part I. The management IP addresses configured on each device cannot be altered, although you may alter the subnet mask and default gateway configuration.

Step 3.

Configure Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) on all routing devices so that any device in the network can communicate with any other device, regardless of the location in the network.

Step 4.

Configure multicast routing on all routing devices, which includes all switches except for Switch-E and Switch-F. Configure a shared tree that is rooted at Router-A, which should be used for initial forwarding of multicast traffic. You are not permitted to manually configure Router-A as the root of the shared tree on any other multicast router. Ensure all interfaces enabled for multicast routing are operating in the appropriate mode as recommended by Cisco.

Step 5.

Configure Switch-E to join the multicast group 239.1.1.1 on VLAN 10. Ensure that any edge device can ping the 239.1.1.1 address with a response from Switch-E.

Step 6.

Ensure that all switches constrain multicast traffic to multicast routers and receivers within each Layer 2 network.

Step 7.

Ensure that any access control configurations on the core switches are still compatible with the new topology.




CCNP Self-Study CCNP Practical Studies. Switching
CCNP(R) Practical Studies: Switching (CCNP Self-Study)
ISBN: 1587200600
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2002
Pages: 135
Authors: Justin Menga

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