Lesson 3:Increasing Security with EFS

Encryption is the process of making information indecipherable to protect it from unauthorized viewing or use. A key is required to decode the information. The Microsoft Encrypting File System (EFS) provides encryption for data in NTFS files stored on disk. This encryption is public key-based and runs as an integrated system service, making it easy to manage, difficult to attack, and transparent to the file owner. If a user who attempts to access an encrypted NTFS file has the private key to that file, the file can be decrypted so that the user can open the file and work with it transparently as a normal document. A user without the private key is denied access.

Windows XP Professional also includes the Cipher command, which provides the ability to encrypt and decrypt files and folders from a command prompt. Windows XP Professional also provides a recovery agent. In the event that the owner loses the private key, the recovery agent can still recover the encrypted file.


After this lesson, you will be able to

  • Encrypt folders and files
  • Decrypt folders and files

Estimated lesson time: 40 minutes


Understanding EFS

EFS allows users to encrypt NTFS files by using a strong public key-based cryptographic scheme that encrypts all files in a folder. Users with roaming profiles can use the same key with trusted remote systems. No administrative effort is needed to begin, and most operations are transparent. Backups and copies of encrypted files are also encrypted if they are in NTFS volumes. Files remain encrypted if you move or rename them, and temporary files created during editing and left unencrypted in the paging file or in a temporary file do not defeat encryption.

You can set policies to recover EFS-encrypted data when necessary. The recovery policy is integrated with overall Windows XP Professional security policy. Control of this policy can be delegated to individuals with recovery authority, and different recovery policies can be configured for different parts of the enterprise. Data recovery discloses only the recovered data, not the key that was used to encrypt the file. Several protections ensure that data recovery is possible and that no data is lost in the case of total system failure.

EFS is implemented either from Windows Explorer or from the command line. It can be enabled or disabled for a computer, domain, or organizational unit (OU) by resetting recovery policy in the Group Policy console in Microsoft Management Console (MMC).

To set Group Policy for the domain or for an OU, your computer must be part of a Microsoft Windows 2000 domain.

You can use EFS to encrypt and decrypt files on remote file servers but not to encrypt data that is transferred over the network. Windows XP Professional provides network protocols, such as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) authentication, to encrypt data over the network.

Table 14.4 lists the key features provided by Windows XP Professional EFS.

Table 14.4 EFS Features

Feature Description

Transparent encryption

In EFS, file encryption does not require the file owner to decrypt and re-encrypt the file on each use. Decryption and encryption happen transparently on file reads and writes to disk.

Strong protection of encryption keys

Public key encryption resists all but the most sophisticated methods of attack. Therefore, in EFS, the file encryption keys areencrypted using a public key from the user's certificate. (Note that Windows XP Professional and Windows 2000 use X.509 v3 certificates.) The list of encrypted file encryption keys is stored with the encrypted file and is unique to it. To decrypt the file encryption keys, the file owner supplies a private key, which only he or she has.

Integral data-recovery system

If the owner's private key is unavailable, the recovery agent can open the file using his or her own private key. There can be more than one recovery agent, each with a different public key, but at least one public recovery key must be present on the system to encrypt a file.

Secure temporary and paging files

Many applications create temporary files while you edit a document, and these temporary files can be left unencrypted on the disk. On computers running Windows XP Professional, EFS can be implemented at the folder level, so any temporary copies of an encrypted file are also encrypted, provided that all files are on NTFS volumes. EFS resides in the Windows operating system kernel and uses the nonpaged pool to store file encryption keys, ensuring that they are never copied to the paging file.

Encrypting

The recommended method to encrypt files is to create an NTFS folder and then encrypt the folder. To encrypt a folder, in the Properties dialog box for the folder, click the General tab. In the General tab, click Advanced, and then select the Encrypt Contents To Secure Data check box. All files placed in the folder are encrypted and the folder is now marked for encryption. Folders that are marked for encryption are not actually encrypted; only the files within the folder are encrypted.

Compressed files cannot be encrypted, and encrypted files cannot be compressed.

After you encrypt the folder, when you save a file in that folder, the file is encrypted using file encryption keys, which are fast symmetric keys designed for bulk encryption. The file is encrypted in blocks, with a different file encryption key for each block. All of the file encryption keys are stored and encrypted in the Data Decryption field (DDF) and the Data Recovery field (DRF) in the file header.

By default, encryption provided by EFS is standard 56-bit encryption. For additional security, North American users can obtain 128-bit encryption by ordering the Enhanced CryptoPAK from Microsoft. Files encrypted by the CryptoPAK cannot be decrypted, accessed, or recovered on a system that supports only the 56-bit encryption.

You use a file that you encrypted just like you would use any other file, as encryption is transparent. There is one exception to using an encrypted file just like you would any other file: encrypted files can't be shared. You do not need to decrypt a file you encrypted before you can use it. When you open an encrypted file, your private key is applied to the DDF to unlock the list of file encryption keys, allowing the file contents to appear normally. EFS automatically detects an encrypted file and locates a user certificate and associated private key. You open the file, make changes to it, and save it, as you would any other file. However, if someone else tries to open your encrypted file, he or she is unable to access the file and receives an access denied message.

If an administrator removes the password on a user account, the user account will lose all EFS-encrypted files, personal certificates, and stored passwords for Web sites or network resources. Each user should make a password reset disk to avoid this situation. To create a password floppy disk, open User Accounts and, under Related Tasks, click Prevent A Forgotten Password. The Forgotten Password Wizard steps you through creating the password reset disk.

Decrypting

Decrypting a folder or file refers to clearing the Encrypt Contents To Secure Data check box in a folder's or file's Advanced Attributes dialog box, which you access from the folder's or file's Properties dialog box. Once decrypted, the file remains so until you select the Encrypt Contents To Secure Data check box. The only reason you might want to decrypt a file would be if other people needed access to the folder or file-for example, if you want to share the folder or make the file available across the network.

Using the Cipher Command

The Cipher command provides the ability to encrypt and decrypt files and folders from a command prompt. The following example shows the available switches for the Cipher command, described in Table 14.5:

 cipher [/e | /d] [/s:folder_name] [/a] [/i] [/f] [/q] [/h] [/k] [file_name [...]] 

Table 14.5 Cipher Command Switches

Switch Description

/e

Encrypts the specified folders. Folders are marked so any files that are added later are encrypted.

/d

Decrypts the specified folders. Folders are marked so any files that are added later are not encrypted.

/s

Performs the specified operation on files in the given folder and all subfolders.

/a

Performs the specified operation on files as well as folders. Encrypted files could be decrypted when modified, if the parent folder is not encrypted. To avoid this, encrypt the file and the parent folder.

/i

Continues performing the specified operation even after errors have occurred. By default, Cipher stops when an error is encountered.

/f

Forces the encryption operation on all specified files, even those that are already encrypted. Files that are already encrypted are skipped by default.

/q

Reports only the most essential information.

/h

Displays files with the hidden or system attributes, which are not shown by default.

/k

Creates a new file encryption key for the user running the Cipher command. Using this option causes the Cipher command to ignore all other options.

file_name

Specifies a pattern, file, or folder.

If you run the Cipher command without parameters, it displays the encryption state of the current folder and any files that it contains. You can specify multiple filenames and use wildcards. You must put spaces between multiple parameters.

Using the Recovery Agent

If you lose your file encryption certificate and associated private key through disk failure or any other reason, a person designated as the recovery agent can open the file using his or her own certificate and associated private key. If the recovery agent is on another computer in the network, send the file to the recovery agent. The recovery agent can bring his or her private key to the owner's computer, but it is never a good security practice to copy a private key onto another computer.

The default recovery agent is the administrator of the local computer unless the computer is part of a domain. In a domain, the domain administrator is the default recovery agent. You can designate alternative EFS recovery accounts for computers grouped by OUs. Before you can designate accounts to alternate recovery agents in a Windows 2000 domain, you must deploy Windows 2000 Server and Certificate Services to issue recovery agent certificates. For more information about Certificate Services, see Chapter 16, "Windows 2000 Certificate Services and Public Key Infrastructure" in the Microsoft Windows 2000 Server Resource Kit Distributed System Guide.

It is a good security practice to rotate recovery agents. However, if the agent designation changes, access to the file is denied. For this reason, you should keep recovery certificates and private keys until all files that are encrypted with them have been updated.

The person designated as the recovery agent has a special certificate and associated private key that allow data recovery. To recover an encrypted file, the recovery agent does the following:

  1. Use Backup or another backup tool to restore a user's backup version of the encrypted file or folder to the computer where his or her file recovery certificate is located.
  2. In Windows Explorer, open the Properties dialog box for the file or folder, and in the General tab, click Advanced.
  3. Clear the Encrypt Contents To Secure Data check box.
  4. Make a backup version of the decrypted file or folder and return the backup version to the user.

Disabling EFS

You can disable EFS for a domain, OU, or computer by applying an empty Encrypted Data Recovery Agent policy setting. Until Encrypted Data Recovery Agent settings are configured and applied through Group Policy, there is no policy, so the default recovery agents are used by EFS. EFS must use the recovery agents that are listed in the Encrypted Data Recovery Agents Group Policy agent if the settings have been configured and applied. If the policy that is applied is empty, EFS does not operate.

Practice: Encrypting Files

In this practice, you log on as an administrator and encrypt a folder and its files. You then log on using a different user account and attempt to open an encrypted file and disable encryption on the encrypted file. Finally, you log on again with the same administrative account and decrypt the folder and its contents that you previously encrypted.

Run the EncryptingFiles file in the Demos folder on the CD-ROM accompanying this book for a demonstration of encrypting folders and files, accessing encrypting files, and decrypting encrypted files.

Exercise 1: Encrypting Files

In this exercise, you will encrypt a folder and its contents.

To encrypt a file

  1. In Windows Explorer, create C:\Secret\File1, and then right-click File1 and click Properties.

    Windows XP Professional displays the Properties dialog box with the General tab active.

  2. Click Advanced.

    The Advanced Attributes dialog box appears.

  3. Click the Encrypt Contents To Secure Data check box and then click OK.
  4. Click OK to close the File1 Properties dialog box.

    An Encryption Warning dialog box informs you that you are about to encrypt a file that is not in an encrypted folder. The default is to encrypt the folder and file, but you can also choose to encrypt only the file.

  5. Click Cancel to close the Encryption Warning dialog box, and then click Cancel again to close the File1 Properties dialog box without encrypting File1.
  6. In Windows Explorer, right-click C:\Secret and then click Properties.
  7. Click Advanced.

    The Advanced Attributes dialog box appears.

  8. Select the Encrypt Contents To Secure Data check box and then click OK.
  9. Click OK to close the Secret Properties dialog box.

    The Confirm Attribute Change dialog box informs you that you are about to encrypt a folder. You have two choices: you can encrypt only this folder, or you can encrypt the folder and all subfolders and files in the folder.

  10. Select the Apply Changes To This Folder, Subfolders And Files option, and then click OK.
  11. In the Secret folder, right-click File1 and then click Properties.

    The File1 Properties dialog box appears.

  12. Click Advanced.

    The Advanced Attributes dialog box appears. Notice that the Encrypt Contents To Secure Data check box is selected.

  13. Close the Advanced Attributes dialog box.
  14. Close the Properties dialog box.
  15. Close all windows and log off.

Exercise 2: Testing the Encrypted Files

In this exercise, you log on using the User5 account and then attempt to open an encrypted file. You then try to disable encryption on the encrypted files.

To test an encrypted file

  1. Log on as User5 with a password of password.
  2. Start Windows Explorer and open C:\Secret\File1.

    What happens?

  3. Close Notepad.

To attempt to disable the encryption

  1. Right-click C:\Secret\File1 and then click Properties.
  2. Click Advanced.
  3. Clear the Encrypt Contents To Secure Data check box and then click OK.
  4. Click OK to close the File1 Properties dialog box.

    The Error Applying Attributes dialog box appears and informs you that access to the file is denied.

  5. Click Cancel.
  6. Close all open windows and dialog boxes.
  7. Log off as User5 and log on as Administrator.

Exercise 3: Decrypting Folders and Files

In this exercise, you decrypt the folder and file that you previously encrypted.

To decrypt files

  1. Start Windows Explorer.
  2. Right-click C:\Secret\File1, and then click Properties.
  3. Click Advanced.
  4. Clear the Encrypt Contents To Secure Data check box and then click OK.
  5. Click OK to close the File1 Properties dialog box.
  6. Close Windows Explorer and log off.

Lesson Review

The following questions will help you determine whether you have learned enough to move on to the next lesson. If you have difficulty answering these questions, review the material in this lesson before beginning the next lesson. The answers are in Appendix A, "Questions and Answers."

  1. What is encryption and what is the Microsoft EFS?
  2. Which of the following files and folders will Windows XP Professional allow you to encrypt? (Choose all answers that are correct.)
    1. A file on an NTFS volume
    2. A folder on a FAT volume
    3. A file stored on a floppy
    4. A folder on an NTFS volume
  3. How do you encrypt a folder? Is the folder actually encrypted?
  4. If the private key belonging to the owner of an encrypted file is not available, how can you decrypt the file?
  5. By default, the recovery agent for a computer running Windows XP Professional in a workgroup is ____________ and the recovery agent for a computer running Windows XP Professional in a domain environment is _____________________.

Lesson Summary

  • EFS provides the core file encryption technology for storage of NTFS files on disk.
  • EFS allows users to encrypt NTFS files by using a strong public key-based cryptographic scheme that encrypts all files in a folder.
  • Users with roaming profiles can use the same key with trusted remote systems.
  • Backups and copies of encrypted files are also encrypted if they are in NTFS volumes.
  • Files remain encrypted if you move or rename them, and encryption is not defeated by leakage to paging files.
  • Windows XP Professional also provides a recovery agent. In the event an owner loses the private key, the recovery agent can still recover the encrypted file.
  • EFS is implemented either from Windows Explorer or from the command line using commands such as Cipher.
  • EFS can be enabled or disabled for a computer, domain, or OU by resetting recovery policy in the Group Policy console in MMC.
  • You can use EFS to encrypt and decrypt files on remote computers, but not to encrypt data that is transferred over the network. Windows XP Professional provides network protocols, such as SSL, to encrypt data over the network.


MCSE Training Kit(c) Microsoft Windows XP Professional (Exam 70-270 2001)
MCSE Training Kit(c) Microsoft Windows XP Professional (Exam 70-270 2001)
ISBN: N/A
EAN: N/A
Year: 2004
Pages: 128

flylib.com © 2008-2017.
If you may any questions please contact us: flylib@qtcs.net