Section 12.4. PyView: An Image and Notes Slideshow


12.4. PyView: An Image and Notes Slideshow

A picture may be worth a thousand words, but it takes considerably fewer to display one with Python. The next program, PyView, implements a simple photo slideshow program in portable Python/Tkinter code. It doesn't have any image processing tools such as PyPhoto's resizing, but it does provide different tools such as image note files, and it can be run without the optional PIL extension.

12.4.1. Running PyView

PyView pulls together many of the topics we studied in Chapter 10: it uses after events to sequence a slideshow, displays image objects in an automatically sized canvas, and so on. Its main window displays a photo on a canvas; users can either open and view a photo directly or start a slideshow mode that picks and displays a random photo from a directory, at regular intervals specified with a scale widget.

By default, PyView slideshows show images in the book's image file directory (though the Open button allows you to load images in arbitrary directories). To view other sets of photos, either pass a directory name in as a first command-line argument or change the default directory name in the script itself. I can't show you a slideshow in action here, but I can show you the main window in general. Figure 12-9 shows the main PyView window's default display.

Figure 12-9. PyView without notes


Though it's not obvious as rendered in this book, the black-on-red label at the top gives the pathname of the photo file displayed. For a good time, move the slider at the bottom all the way over to "0" to specify no delay between photo changes, and then click Start to begin a very fast slideshow. If your computer is at least as fast as mine, photos flip by much too fast to be useful for anything but subliminal advertising. Slideshow photos are loaded on startup to retain references to them (remember, you must hold on to image objects). But the speed with which large GIFs can be thrown up in a window in Python is impressive, if not downright exhilarating.

The GUI's Start button changes to a Stop button during a slideshow (its text attribute is reset with the widget config method). Figure 12-10 shows the scene after pressing Stop at an opportune moment.

Figure 12-10. PyView after stopping a slideshow


In addition, each photo can have an associated "notes" text file that is automatically opened along with the image. You can use this feature to record basic information about the photo. Press the Note button to open an additional set of widgets that let you view and change the note file associated with the currently displayed photo. This additional set of widgets should look familiarthe PyEdit text editor of the previous section is attached to PyView to serve as a display and editing widget for photo notes. Figure 12-11 shows PyView with the attached PyEdit note-editing component opened.

Figure 12-11. PyView with notes


This makes for a very big window, usually best view maximized (taking up the entire screen). The main thing to notice, though, is the lower-right corner of this display, above the scaleit's simply an attached PyEdit object, running the very same code listed in the prior section. Because PyEdit is implemented as a GUI class, it can be reused like this in any GUI that needs a text-editing interface. When embedded like this, PyEdit's menus are based on a frame (it doesn't own the window at large), text content is stored and fetched directly, and some standalone options are omitted (e.g., the File pull down is gone).

The note file viewer appears only if you press the Note button, and it is erased if you press it again; PyView uses the widget pack and pack_forget methods introduced at the end of Chapter 10 to show and hide the note viewer frame. The window automatically expands to accommodate the note viewer when it is packed and displayed. It is also possible to open the note file in a PyEdit pop-up window, but PyView embeds the editor to retain a direct visual association. Watch for PyEdit to show up embedded within another GUI like this when we meet PyMailGUI in Chapter 15.

A caveat here: out of the box, PyView supports as many photo formats as Tkinter's PhotoImage object does; that's why it looks for GIF files by default. You can improve this by installing the PIL extension to view JPEGs (and many others). But because PIL is an optional extension today, it's not incorporated into this PyView release. See the end of Chapter 9 for more on PIL and image formats.

12.4.2. PyView Source Code

Because the PyView program was implemented in stages, you need to study the union of two files and classes to understand how it truly works. One file implements a class that provides core slideshow functionality; the other implements a class that extends the original class, to add additional features on top of the core behavior. Let's start with the extension class: Example 12-6 adds a set of features to an imported slideshow base classnote editing, a delay scale and file label, and so on. This is the file that is actually run to start PyView.

Example 12-6. PP3E\Gui\SlideShow\slideShowPlus.py

 ################################################################### # SlideShowPlus: add note files with an attached PyEdit object, # a scale for setting the slideshow delay interval, and a label # that gives the name of the image file currently being displayed; ################################################################### import os from Tkinter import * from PP3E.Gui.TextEditor.textEditor import * from slideShow import SlideShow #from slideShow_threads import SlideShow class SlideShowPlus(SlideShow):     def _ _init_ _(self, parent, picdir, editclass, msecs=2000):         self.msecs = msecs         self.editclass = editclass         SlideShow._ _init_ _(self, parent=parent, picdir=picdir, msecs=msecs)     def makeWidgets(self):         self.name = Label(self, text='None', bg='red', relief=RIDGE)         self.name.pack(fill=X)         SlideShow.makeWidgets(self)         Button(self, text='Note', command=self.onNote).pack(fill=X)         Button(self, text='Help', command=self.onHelp).pack(fill=X)         s = Scale(label='Speed: msec delay', command=self.onScale,                   from_=0, to=3000, resolution=50, showvalue=YES,                   length=400, tickinterval=250, orient='horizontal')         s.pack(side=BOTTOM, fill=X)         s.set(self.msecs)         if self.editclass == TextEditorMain:          # make editor now             self.editor = self.editclass(self.master) # need root for menu         else:             self.editor = self.editclass(self)         # embedded or pop-up         self.editor.pack_forget( )                     # hide editor initially         self.editorUp = self.image = None     def onStart(self):         SlideShow.onStart(self)         self.config(cursor='watch')     def onStop(self):         SlideShow.onStop(self)         self.config(cursor='hand2')     def onOpen(self):         SlideShow.onOpen(self)         if self.image:             self.name.config(text=os.path.split(self.image[0])[1])         self.config(cursor='crosshair')         self.switchNote( )     def quit(self):         self.saveNote( )         SlideShow.quit(self)     def drawNext(self):         SlideShow.drawNext(self)         if self.image:             self.name.config(text=os.path.split(self.image[0])[1])         self.loadNote( )     def onScale(self, value):         self.msecs = int(value)     def onNote(self):         if self.editorUp:                   # if editor already open             #self.saveNote( )               # save text, hide editor             self.editor.pack_forget( )             self.editorUp = 0         else:             self.editor.pack(side=TOP)     # else unhide/pack editor             self.editorUp = 1              # and load image note text             self.loadNote( )     def switchNote(self):         if self.editorUp:             self.saveNote( )                # save current image's note             self.loadNote( )                # load note for new image     def saveNote(self):         if self.editorUp:             currfile = self.editor.getFileName()       # or self.editor.onSave( )             currtext = self.editor.getAllText( )      # but text may be empty             if currfile and currtext:                 try:                     open(currfile, 'w').write(currtext)                 except:                     pass # this may be normal if run off cd     def loadNote(self):         if self.image and self.editorUp:             root, ext = os.path.splitext(self.image[0])             notefile  = root + '.note'             self.editor.setFileName(notefile)             try:                 self.editor.setAllText(open(notefile).read( ))             except:                 self.editor.clearAllText( )     def onHelp(self):         showinfo('About PyView',                  'PyView version 1.1\nJuly, 1999\n'                  'An image slide show\nProgramming Python 2E') if _ _name_ _ == '_ _main_ _':     import sys     picdir = '../gifs'     if len(sys.argv) >= 2:         picdir = sys.argv[1]     editstyle = TextEditorComponentMinimal     if len(sys.argv) == 3:         try:             editstyle = [TextEditorMain,                          TextEditorMainPopup,                          TextEditorComponent,                          TextEditorComponentMinimal][int(sys.argv[2])]         except: pass     root = Tk( )     root.title('PyView 1.1 - plus text notes')     Label(root, text="Slide show subclass").pack( )     SlideShowPlus(parent=root, picdir=picdir, editclass=editstyle)     root.mainloop( ) 

The core functionality extended by SlideShowPlus lives in Example 12-7. This was the initial slideshow implementation; it opens images, displays photos, and cycles through a slideshow. You can run it by itself, but you won't get advanced features such as notes and sliders added by the SlideShowPlus subclass.

Example 12-7. PP3E\Gui\SlideShow\slideShow.py

 ######################################################################## # SlideShow: a simple photo image slideshow in Python/Tkinter; # the base feature set coded here can be extended in subclasses; ######################################################################## from Tkinter import * from glob import glob from tkMessageBox import askyesno from tkFileDialog import askopenfilename import random Width, Height = 450, 450 imageTypes = [('Gif files', '.gif'),    # for file open dialog               ('Ppm files', '.ppm'),    # plus jpg with a Tk patch,               ('Pgm files', '.pgm'),    # plus bitmaps with BitmapImage               ('All files', '*')] class SlideShow(Frame):     def _ _init_ _(self, parent=None, picdir='.', msecs=3000, **args):         Frame._ _init_ _(self, parent, args)         self.makeWidgets( )         self.pack(expand=YES, fill=BOTH)         self.opens = picdir         files = []         for label, ext in imageTypes[:-1]:             files = files + glob('%s/*%s' % (picdir, ext))         self.images = map(lambda x: (x, PhotoImage(file=x)), files)         self.msecs  = msecs         self.beep   = 1         self.drawn  = None     def makeWidgets(self):         self.canvas = Canvas(self, bg='white', height=Height, width=Width)         self.canvas.pack(side=LEFT, fill=BOTH, expand=YES)         self.onoff = Button(self, text='Start', command=self.onStart)         self.onoff.pack(fill=X)         Button(self, text='Open',  command=self.onOpen).pack(fill=X)         Button(self, text='Beep',  command=self.onBeep).pack(fill=X)         Button(self, text='Quit',  command=self.onQuit).pack(fill=X)     def onStart(self):         self.loop = 1         self.onoff.config(text='Stop', command=self.onStop)         self.canvas.config(height=Height, width=Width)         self.onTimer( )     def onStop(self):         self.loop = 0         self.onoff.config(text='Start', command=self.onStart)     def onOpen(self):         self.onStop( )         name = askopenfilename(initialdir=self.opens, filetypes=imageTypes)         if name:             if self.drawn: self.canvas.delete(self.drawn)             img = PhotoImage(file=name)             self.canvas.config(height=img.height(), width=img.width( ))             self.drawn = self.canvas.create_image(2, 2, image=img, anchor=NW)             self.image = name, img     def onQuit(self):         self.onStop( )         self.update( )         if askyesno('PyView', 'Really quit now?'):             self.quit( )     def onBeep(self):         self.beep = self.beep ^ 1     def onTimer(self):         if self.loop:             self.drawNext( )             self.after(self.msecs, self.onTimer)     def drawNext(self):         if self.drawn: self.canvas.delete(self.drawn)         name, img  = random.choice(self.images)         self.drawn = self.canvas.create_image(2, 2, image=img, anchor=NW)         self.image = name, img         if self.beep: self.bell( )         self.canvas.update( ) if _ _name_ _ == '_ _main_ _':     import sys     if len(sys.argv) == 2:         picdir = sys.argv[1]     else:         picdir = '../gifs'     root = Tk( )     root.title('PyView 1.0')     root.iconname('PyView')     Label(root, text="Python Slide Show Viewer").pack( )     SlideShow(root, picdir=picdir, bd=3, relief=SUNKEN)     root.mainloop( ) 

To give you a better idea of what this core base class implements, Figure 12-12 shows what it looks like if run by itself (actually, two copies run by themselves) by a script called slideShow_frames, which is in this book's examples distribution.

Figure 12-12. Two attached SlideShow objects


The simple slideShow_frames scripts attach two instances of SlideShow to a single windowa feat possible only because state information is recorded in class instance variables, not in globals. The slideShow_toplevels script (also in the book's examples distribution) attaches two SlideShows to two top-level pop-up windows instead. In both cases, the slideshows run independently but are based on after events fired from the same single event loop in a single process.




Programming Python
Programming Python
ISBN: 0596009259
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2004
Pages: 270
Authors: Mark Lutz

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