Extensibility and the DOM


So far, what we've described of the DOM's functionality is fairly genericmost of the methods and properties outlined in the previous section are part of the W3C's proposed standard for the Level 1 DOM. (The Extending Dreamweaver manual details which items are non-standard.) How do we employ all this scripting power to write Dreamweaver extensions?

DOM Object

In the discussion of the Dreamweaver Application Programming Interface (API) in Chapter 1, "Dreamweaver Configuration and the API," we saw that the API includes a number of custom objects. One of those objects is the DOM for the user's current document. This object contains many crucial methods and properties for working with user documents.

Accessing the DOM Object

Before the DOM object's methods and properties can be used, we must officially access the target document's DOM. We do this by calling another function dw.getDocumentDOM() to give the DOM object a name and open it to scripting control. In scripting terms, we call this instantiating the DOM object. The syntax for the instantiation statement looks like this:

 var myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM(); 

Any references to DOM object methods or properties for the current document can then access the DOM object by referring to its name, like this:

 myDOM.setSelection();  myDOM.pageUp(); 

And so forth. In general, DOM objects can only be named for open documents; although if there are multiple open documents (as when working with frames , for instance), multiple DOM objects can exist. Table 4.10 lists the specifications of the dw.getDocumentDOM() function .

Table 4.10. Specifications for dw.getDocumentDOM()

Specification

Details

Syntax

dw.getDocumentDOM() dreamweaver.getDocumentDOM()

(The dreamweaver object can be referred to as dw or dreamweaver . Throughout this book, we'll use dw .)

Description

This function creates a DOM object, giving access to the contents of a document's object structure.

Arguments

No arguments are required. If no arguments are present, the currently active document will be used as the source of the DOM object.

Optional arguments: "document" , "parent" , "parent.frames[number]" , "parent.frames['framename']" , or a URL. (URLs must be absolute or relative to the extension file.)

Returns

The document object at the top of the DOM hierarchy (DOCUMENT_NODE type).

The DOM Object at Work

After we have our instantiated DOM object, we have access to the document's hierarchy of nodes, and we can use the hundreds of DOM object methods that are part of the Dreamweaver API. No wonder the Macromedia documentation calls this "the most important function"!

Using the DOM to Work with Objects

Using the DOM, we can gain access to all objects in the user's document. After we have access, we can make determinations about document content, change object properties, and perform other editing operations.

Use the charts shown in Table 4.1 through Table 4.9 to determine what properties of objects can be changed. Based on the listings in those charts , you should understand what these code samples can do:

 //change the background color and default text color of the user's page  var myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM();  myDOM.body.bgcolor = "#000000";  myDOM.body.text = "#FFFFFF";  //determine the absolute file address of the user's page  var myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM();  var myURL = myDOM.URL;  //determine the number of elements in the document's body section  var myDOM=dw.getDocumentDOM();  var myBODY=myDOM.body;  var myCONTENTS=myBODY.childNodes.length;  //if the first item on the page is a table, change its border to "3"  var myDOM=dw.getDocumentDOM();  var myBODY=myDOM.body;  var myFIRST=myBODY.childNodes.item(0);  if (myFIRST.tagName == "TABLE") {     myFIRST.border="3";  } 

You also have access to the hundreds of DOM methods in the Dreamweaver API, to make working with objects easier. This book isn't long enough to list and discuss every one of those; check out the Extending Dreamweaver manual for that. Table 4.11 details some useful functions for working with objects in a document.

Table 4.11. General purpose API functions for working with objects

Function

dom.insertHTML()

Description

Inserts the specified HTML code at the insertion point.

Syntax

dom.insertHTML(' code to insert goes here ')

Arguments

The code to insert.

Returns

nothing

Example

//inserts the code for a spacer image, //using relative URL myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM(); myDOM.insertHTML('<img src="shim.gif" width="10" height="10">');

Function

dom.insertText()

Description

Inserts the specified text at the insertion point.

Syntax

dom.insertText(' text to insert goes here ')

Arguments

The text to insert.

Returns

nothing

Example

//inserts a text string into the text portion of graphics/ccc.gif the document //including the proper HTML coding for the graphics/ccc.gif ampersand myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM(); myDOM.insertText('Hello & good-bye .');

Function

dom.insertObject()

Description

Inserts the specified Dreamweaver object at the insertion point.

Syntax

dom.insertObject( objectName )

Arguments

The name of the object file (minus its filename extension) to insert.

Returns

nothing

Example

//inserts an image object, as though it were // chosen from the Objects panel myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM(); myDOM.insertObject('Image');

Function

dom.wrapTag()

Description

Wraps the specified tag around the current selection. The selection must be able to accept a tag wrapped around it without generating invalid HTML, or Dreamweaver will report an error.

Syntax

dom.wrapTag( startTag )

Arguments

The name of the tag to wrap around the selection (as it appears in its opening tag).

Returns

nothing

Example

//if the current selection is an image, //wraps a link around the image tag myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM(); myObject = myDOM.getSelectedNode(); if (myObject.nodeType == "1" && myObject.tagName graphics/ccc.gif == 'IMG') { myDOM.wrapTag('<a href="mypage.html">'); }

Function

dom.stripTag()

Description

Removes the tag from around the current selection. If the tag has contents, it'll remain . If the selection contains more or less than one tag, Dreamweaver will report an error.

Syntax

dom.stripTag()

Arguments

none

Returns

nothing

Example

//if the current selection is a link, //the link is removed myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM(); myObject = myDOM.getSelectedNode(); if (myObject.nodeType == "1" && myObject.tagName graphics/ccc.gif == 'A') { myDOM.stripTag(); }

Using the DOM to Work with Selections

Working with selections is an important part of using the DOM. We may need to know what the user has selected, move the insertion point, expand or contract the current selection, or select new page elements. We may need to gain access to selected objects, or create selections from certain objects. The DOM object includes a variety of powerful functions for working with selections. These are detailed in Table 4.12 through Table 4.14.

Table 4.12. API Functions for getting information about the current selection

Function

dom.getSelectedNode()

Description

Gets access to the node that contains the current selection or insertion point.

Syntax

variableName = dom.getSelectedNode()

Arguments

None

Returns

The document object at the top of the DOM hierarchy (DOCUMENT_NODE type).

Example

//returns true if the current selection is part graphics/ccc.gif of a text node myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM(); var currentNode = myDOM.getSelectedNode(); if (currentNode.nodeType == "3") { return "true"; } else { return "false"; }

Function

dom.getSelection()

Description

Gets access to the current selection, expressed as character offsets into the current document.

Syntax

variableName = dom.getSelection()

Arguments

None

Returns

An array consisting of two numbers . The first item in the array represents character offset at the start of the selection. The second item represents the offset value at the end of the selection. If the current selection is an insertion point, the two items in the array are the same.

Example

//determine if the selection is an insertion graphics/ccc.gif point myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM(); var mySelection = myDOM.getSelection(); if (mySelection[0] == mySelection[1]) { window.alert("The current selection is an graphics/ccc.gif insertion point."); }

Table 4.13. API functions for using selection offsets to work with objects

Function

dom.nodeToOffsets()

Description

Gets the position of a specified object (node) in the document, expressed as character offsets into the document.

Syntax

variableName = dom.nodeToOffsets( objectName )

Arguments

An object (node)

Returns

An array consisting of two numbers. The first item in the array represents character offset at the start of the node. The second item represents the offset value at the end of the node. (Once we have these values, we can select the node.)

Example

//finds the offsets for the first image in a graphics/ccc.gif document //and uses them to select the image var myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM(); var firstImage = myDOM.images[0]; imageOffsets = myDOM.nodeToOffsets(firstImage); myDOM.setSelection(imageOffsets[0], graphics/ccc.gif imageOffsets[1]);

Function

dom.offsetsToNode()

Description

Gets access to the object (node) in the document that completely surrounds the current selection.

Syntax

variableName = dom.nodeToOffsets( offsetBegin,offsetEnd )

Arguments

Two numbers, representing the character offsets of a selection.

Returns

The object (node) that contains the selection.

Example

//determines the node containing the current graphics/ccc.gif selection, //and returns true if it's a text node var myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM(); var mySelection = myDOM.getSelection(); var currentObject = myDOM.offsetsToNode( graphics/ccc.gif mySelection[0], mySelection[1]);

Notes

Using this function with dom.getSelection() , as in the example here, is the same as using dom.getSelectedNode() .

Table 4.14. API Functions for setting and manipulating the selection

Function

dom.selectAll()

Description

Selects all, as if the user had chosen Edit > Select All. In most cases, this selects all the content in a document. Other times (for instance, if the current insertion point is inside a table), it selects all of some element in the document.

Syntax

dom.selectAll()

Arguments

none

Returns

nothing

Notes

To ensure that all contents of the active document are selected, use dom.setSelection() instead of this command.

Function

dom.selectTable()

Description

Selects a table.

Syntax

dom.selectTable()

Arguments

none

Returns

nothing

Enabler

dom.canSelectTable() (Returns true if the current selection is within a table.)

Example

//determines if the insertion point is within a graphics/ccc.gif table, //and if so, selects the table var myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM(); if (myDOM.canSelectTable()) { myDOM.selectTable(); }

Function

dom.setSelectedNode()

Description

Selects the specified object (node).

Syntax

dom.setSelectedNode(node, [bSelectInside] , [bJumpToNode] )

Arguments

An object (node)Required.

bSelectInside (Boolean)If the specified node is an element node, this determines if the selection includes the innerHTML (the contents but not the outer tags) or the outerHTML (the contents and the surrounding tags). Optional. Defaults to false, if omitted.

bJumpToNode (Boolean)If this option is set to true , the document window will scroll to show the selection. Optional. Defaults to false if omitted.

Returns

nothing

Example

//selects the first image in the document, //and scrolls the document window to show the graphics/ccc.gif selection var myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM(); var firstImage = myDOM.images[0]; myDOM.setSelectedNode(firstImage,0,1);

Notes

Using this function is equivalent to calling dom.nodeToOffsets() and passing the return value to dom.setSelection() .

Function

dom.setSelection()

Description

Sets the selection based on two numbers representing character offsets into the document.

Syntax

dom.setSelection( offsetBegin , offsetEnd )

Arguments

Two numbers, representing the desired beginning and ending of the selection expressed as character offsets into the document.

Returns

nothing

Example

//finds the current selection, and changes it //to an insertion point at the end of the graphics/ccc.gif selection var myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM(); var mySelection = myDOM.getSelection(); myDOM.setSelection(mySelection[1],mySelection[1]); graphics/ccc.gif

Notes

If the newly set selection would not be a valid HTML selection, Dreamweaver automatically expands the selection to include the nearest valid selection.

Function

dw.selectAll()

Description

Selects all in the active document, or in the site window, or (Mac only) in the edit field that has focus in a dialog box or floating panel.

Syntax

dw.selectAll() or dreamweaver.selectAll()

Arguments

none

Returns

nothing

Enabler

dw.canSelectAll() (Returns true if Dreamweaver can perform the Select All operation.)

Example

if (dw.canSelectAll()) { dw.selectAll(); }

Notes

To ensure that all contents of the active document are selected, use dom.setSelection() instead of this command.

Function

dom.selectChild()

Description

Selects a child of the current selection.

Syntax

dom.selectChild()

Arguments

none

Returns

nothing

Notes

For better control over which child to select, use dom.getSelectedNode() and access the childNodes property.

Function

dom.selectParent()

Description

Selects the parent object of the current selection.

Syntax

dom.selectParent()

Arguments

none

Returns

nothing

Notes

This is similar to using dom.getSelectedNode() and accessing the parentNode property.

A few notes about selections are in order. Selections can be accessed or set in two ways: by object or by character offsets. Generally, we need to work with both methods to accomplish our goals.

Object-based selection commands should be familiar to you by now. The dom.getSelectedNode() function gains access to whatever object is currently selected; dom.setSelectedNode() selects a specified object.

Using character offsets may be a little more unfamiliar. The dom.getSelection() function always returns an array of two numbers. The first number represents the beginning of the selectionit's the number you would get if you switched to Code view and counted characters from the beginning of the HTML code to where the selection starts. The second number represents the end of the selection. Some examples of character offsets:

  • In any document, the HTML element starts at character 0 and ends at the last character in the document.

  • In any document, the head element will start at character 7immediately after the six characters of the <html> tag, in other words.

  • Any time the current selection is only an insertion point; the beginning and ending offsets will be the same.

After we understand this, we can see how to combine the selection functions to perform useful tasks :

To select a particular object in the document:

 //get access to the object  var myObject = myDOM.body.childNodes.item(0);  //select the object  myDOM.setSelectedNode(myObject); 

To delete a particular object:

 //get access to the object  var myObject = myDOM.body.childNodes.item(0);  //select the object  myDOM.setSelectedNode(myObject);  //delete the current selection  myDOM.deleteSelection(); 

To determine what kind of object the user has selected:

 //get access to the selected object  var myObject = myDOM.getSelectedNode();  //use conditionals to determine the node type and properties  if (myObject.nodeType == "3") {  window.alert("You have selected text.");  } 

To place the insertion point after the currently selected object:

 //get access to the selected object  var myObject = myDOM.getSelectedNode();  //determine the offsets of the selected object  mySelection = myObject.nodeToOffsets();  //set the selection to an insertion point that matches the final offset  myDOM.setSelection(mySelection[1],mySelection[1]); 
Using the DOM to Work with Strings of Code

Another way to access and work with page contents is by treating the document and its elements as strings of HTML code, and performing string operations on them. As Table 4.4 showed earlier in this chapter, objects of the ELEMENT_NODE type include two properties innerHTML and outerHTML that return strings. This is a different way of accessing the object code. This script, for instance, will return an object with properties that can be set and functions that can be performed on it:

 var myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM();   var myObject = myDOM.body.childNodes.item(0);   if (myObject.nodeType == "1" && myObject.tagName == "IMG") {   myObject.alt = "This is an image.";  } 

This script accesses the same code, but as a string subject to string methods:

 var myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM();  var myObject = myDOM.body.childNodes.item(0);  var myString = myObject.outerHTML;  window.alert(myString.toUpperCase()); 

Why would you use this method? It's often the best way to pull a section of code or text out of a document, edit it, and put it back into the document. (We'll see how this works in the next chapter.)

Enhancing Objects and Behaviors Using the DOM

Being able to work with the DOM is most important when we're doing work that involves more than just inserting new code into documents. Therefore, objects and behaviors rely on the DOM less than other extension types. But there are tasks within objects and behaviors that require DOM access and knowledge.

isDomRequired()

As part of the API for objects, this function determines whether an object can be inserted if Code view and Design view have not been synchronized. If the HTML code of a user's document contains invalid markup instructions (incomplete tag pairs, for instance), the DOM is not valid, and certain objects should not be inserted. The function itself only requires a return value of true or false ; but when you are determining how to apply the function, you need to know whether the code you are inserting will work properly without a valid DOM.

canAcceptBehavior()

We've already had a little experience with this function. As part of the API for behaviors, it controls whether a behavior will be grayed out in the behaviors inspector menu, usually based on whether a required element of the behavior is present on the page. Behaviors that control images are useless unless there are images on a page, for instance. To implement this level of functionality for canAcceptBehavior() , we need to be able to step through the code to see if any IMG tags are present. After a DOM object has been instantiated, as we've seen above, we can do this:

 function canAcceptBehavior() {  var myDOM = dw.getDocumentDOM();  if (myDOM.images[0]) {  return true;  } else {  return false;  }  } 

(If you're curiousand you probably are, or you wouldn't be reading this booktry it out! Open up one of the behaviors we created in the previous chapter, and add the preceding canAcceptBehavior() function. Then reload extensions and try the behavior out, first in a document with images and then in a document with no images.)



Dreamweaver MX Extensions
Dreamweaver MX Extensions
ISBN: 0735711828
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2001
Pages: 141
Authors: Laura Gutman

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