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honeypots for windows
Introduction
Honeypots for Windows
by Roger A. Grimes
Apress 2005
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Welcome to the world of honeypots! By reading this book, you are joining a friendly community of like-minded individuals who see honeypots as an important step in preventing and learning about malicious hacking activity.

If you were to ask a honeypot administrator why he uses a honeypot, the first response you would likely get is one or more legitimate business reasons explaining why honeypots are the best tool for the job. We’ve been trained to respond that way, so we can defend all our time spent managing and learning about honeypots to our bosses and loved ones. But underlying all the official logic is the real reason why most of us get interested in honeypots: the thrill of watching the bad guys expose themselves and their techniques, in an environment explicitly built to exploit them. It’s videotaping the thief. It’s taking the hacker’s favorite tool of social engineering and using it against him. It’s hacking the hacker.

For once, the good guys are in control and winning. With honeypots, we can track the hackers back to their lairs, identify them, and learn and defend against their techniques before they really get a chance to use them. Honeypots can stop hacker attacks, Internet worms, spam, and other acts of maliciousness. Honeypots remove the implicit veil of privacy most hackers think they have when they exploit a computer. If honeypots become as big and mature as most security experts expect them to be, they could put an end to the random, no consequence, hacking that so proliferates our Internet experience today. Honeypots are one of the few offensive plays in the computer security world.

Honeypots no longer need to prove their value. They have been responsible for discovering many new threats (called zero-day exploits) before they were widely known and used, including aSamba buffer overflow. Honeypots have been essential in capturing encrypted hacker traffic and instrumental in learning that hackers are using version 6 of the Internet Protocol (IPv6) to tunnel their communications under the very noses of network administrators. But perhaps, the greatest demonstration of a honeypot’s value was the recent profiling of an extensive credit card fraud operation (http://www.honeynet.org/papers/profiles/cc-fraud.pdf).

Researchers followed the online activities and communications of individuals involved with credit card fraud, also known as carders. The honeynet was able to capture an incredibly automated Internet Relay Chat (IRC) network that allowed credit card numbers and identifying information to be stolen by simply typing a few keystrokes. Members of the ring could type in !cc to receive one random stolen credit card number. Other commands returned credit card account limits and provided web site links to vulnerable online merchant sites. The honeynet tracked key individuals, mostly located in South Asia and Pacific Rim countries, as they bought credit card numbers from legitimate businesses, hacked credit card security systems, and taught newcomers the ins and outs of carding. The credit card ring, by plying its trade online and out in the open, made their illegal activities appear more as a subculture than a crime. This attracted new participants. Honeypots allowed evidence to be recorded that after-the-fact affidavits, search warrants, and bugged phone conversations couldn’t provide. The honeypot has solidified its place as a legitimate computer security defense tool.

Why Another Book on Honeypots?

There are already some excellent books, papers, and web sites on honeypots, so why did I feel compelled to write a book on the subject? In one sentence, it’s because the world of computer security, and honeypots in particular, is largely Unix-based. Most of the literature about firewalls, intrusion detection systems (IDSs), and honeypots was written by Unix gurus. Most of the tools are Unix-based and work only on Unix platforms. Even when the tools are ported to Windows, they may talk about Windows and give a few Windows examples, but most of the text and examples are for Unix-based users. It can be very frustrating when you are not a Unix person but still want to learn about computer security and use all the cool tools.

The majority of the world’s PCs run one of Microsoft’s Windows operation systems. This book was written to fill the large gap for Windows administrators trying to learn about honeypots outside the Unix subculture. I don’t give examples of software and exploits that do not occur in the typical Windows environment. When the book discusses mail servers, it will be referring to Microsoft Exchange, not Sendmail. When it refers to web servers, it will be talking about Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS), not Apache. Yes, I know both of those programs have Windows-based counterparts, but they aren’t the norm in aWindows network. This doesn’t mean that the knowledge and lessons learned in this book cannot be applied to non-Microsoft environments. The opposite is true. You can take anything covered in this book and easily apply it to Unix, Linux, Macintosh, or any other computer environment. But for once, this is a honeypot resource that targets the Windows administrator. It means the following:

  • Honeypot planning and setup will target Windows systems.

  • Security tools will be Windows versions.

  • Hacking examples will be Windows examples.

  • When TCP/IP is discussed, it will be as it applies in Windows.

  • When TCP/IP ports are discussed, they will be ports common to Windows.

Honeypots for Windows is a book for Windows-based users and administrators.

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Honeypots for Windows
Honeypots for Windows (Books for Professionals by Professionals)
ISBN: 1590593359
EAN: 2147483647
Year: 2006
Pages: 119

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