Section 3.4. Networking, Wireless, and Mobility


3.4. Networking, Wireless, and Mobility


Connect to a network or the Internet.


To open

Click the network icon in the System Tray Connect or disconnect

Control Panel [Network and Internet] Connect to a network

Control Panel [Network and Internet] Network and Sharing Center Connect to a network


Description

Once you've set up a network connection, use the "Connect to a network" screen to connect to any networkwired, wireless, VPN, or dial-up.

Connecting is straightforward: double-click the network to which you want to connect, or highlight it and click Connect. When you're connected to a network, disconnect from it by clicking Disconnect.

This screen is primarily designed for wireless, dial-up, and VPN connections. If your only connection to a network is via an Ethernet cable, you won't even get to the screen when you choose to connect. Instead, you'll be told that you're already connected to the network. Want to disconnect? There's a simple, physical solution for youunplug your Ethernet cable.


Configure and manage your network connections.


To open

Control Panel [Network and Internet] Network and Sharing Center Manage network connections

Command prompt ncpa.cpl


Description

Manage Network Connections is actually a specialized folder that lists and provides details about all of your network connections, and lets you configure and manage them. Click any network connection and a toolbar appears that lets you take a variety of actions on the connection, including connecting it, disabling the network device, renaming the connection, viewing the status of the connection, changing the connection's settings, and diagnosing problems with the connection.


Configure and manage wireless networks.


To open

Control Panel [Network and Internet] Network and Sharing Center Manage wireless networks


Description

Many people regularly connect to more than one wireless networkone at home, one at work, and possibly more than one public hotspot. When you create a wireless connection, you have the option of saving that network as a connection; any networks that you've saved will show up on the Manage Wireless Networks screen.


Configure network services associated with a network connection.


To open

Control Panel [Network and Internet] Network and Sharing Center View Status Properties


Description

The Network Connection Properties screen lists all the installed protocols and services associated with a network connection (both wired and wireless). It provides you with basic information about your wireless connection to help with troubleshooting, and it helps you configure your network and its connection. You can selectively choose which protocols and services are supported by any specific connection by using the checkboxes in the list.


Display a "live" map of your network.


To open

Control Panel [Network and Internet] Network and Sharing Center View full map


Description

The Network Map feature shows a detailed schematic of your network and all the devices connected to it. The map is "live"that is, the icons are not merely representations, but also perform actions and provide information. Hover your mouse over a device and you'll get information about that device; for example, hover your mouse over a gateway to see its IP address and MAC address (a MAC address is a unique identifier for network hardware, a kind of serial number). Click a PC, and you'll connect to it and see all the shared network files and folders in Windows Explorer. Click the Internet icon, and you'll launch your default browser to your home page.


Configure, customize, and access network and collaboration tools.


To open

Control Panel [Network and Internet] Network and Sharing Center


Description

The Network and Sharing Center lets you configure, access, and troubleshoot a wide variety of network features. You'll most likely find that it's the primary place you'll turn for handling network issues, configuring networks, troubleshooting networks, and performing other network-related tasks.

Front and center is a brief diagram of your network, showing your computer name and how it connects to your local network, and then to the Internet. Think of it as a kind of "you-are-here" diagram, because you'll see the words "This computer" underneath your computer. The diagram is so basic that at first it appears it may be useless, but in fact, you'll find it surprisingly useful. The diagram is "live" so that if there's a problem with your network or Internet connection, you'll be notified here. In addition, you can click on the icons representing the different portions of your network and connect to them. For example, click your computer's icon, and you'll open Windows Explorer to your Computer folder. Click the Network icon to open Windows Explorer to the Network folder, which lists all of the computers on your network. Click Internet to open Internet Explorer to your home page.


Set up a new network or Internet connection.


To open

Control Panel [Network and Internet] Network and Sharing Center Set up a connection or network


Description

One of the reasons that networking in Windows Vista is so much easier than working in previous Windows versions is this wizard. Answer a series of questions, and you can set up a new network or connection in minutes.


Get details about a network connection.


To open

Control Panel [Network and Internet] Network and Sharing Center View Status

Control Panel [Network and Internet] Network and Sharing Center Manage network connections Right-click a connection and select Status


Description

You can use this screen for wired and wireless networks, although it will be used more frequently for wireless networks because wireless connections require more care and handling than wired connections. They are more apt to be slow because of interference problems, and to disconnect due to interference and other problems. And you're likely to have multiple wireless connections set up on your PCone for work, one for home, and several for your favorite hotspots.

The Network Connection Status screen provides you with basic information about your connection to help with troubleshooting, and to help you configure your network and its connection.


Access another computer remotely and use it as though you are sitting in front of it.


To open

Start All Programs Accessories Remote Desktop Connection

Command Prompt mstsc


Description

Remote Desktop Connection allows you to connect to another computer (or allows someone else to connect to your computer) and use it as though you were sitting in front of it. Much more than simply a remote command prompt (like SSH or Telnet), Remote Desktop Connection allows you to see a full Desktop, complete with icons and the Start menu, and even run programs on the remote computer.


Work with files stored on a network when you're not connected to it.


To open

Control Panel [Network and Internet] Offline Files


Description

The Offline Files dialog lets you turn on (and off) and configure Windows Vista's Offline Files feature, which allows you to work with files stored on a network (either server-based or peer-to-peer), when you're not actually connected to the network. Windows XP also had the capability to work with offline files, but it was so confusing to use and configure that people rarely used it. In Windows Vista, the Offline Files dialog and the Sync Center make the use of offline files far easier. If you use a laptop to connect to your network and would like the ability to work with those files when you're not connected, it's an extremely useful feature.


Select a power plan for your laptop.


To open

Control Panel Change battery settings

Control Panel [Mobile PC] Power Options

Right-click the battery icon Power Options

Command Prompt powercfg.cpl


Description

When you use a laptop, you're always balancing the need to save power against laptop performance. You want to use the computer as long as possible on a battery charge (for example, if you're on a cross-country airplane trip), but you also want to be as productive as possible when using it.

The Power Options Control Panel lets you choose a power plan for your laptop, customize power plans, and change a variety of other power options.


Synchronize files and folders with devices and network folders.


To open

Control Panel [Mobile PC] Sync Center

Control Panel [Network and Internet] Sync Center

Command Prompt mobsync


Description

If you have multimedia devices such as MP3 players and iPods, have portable storage devices such as USB flash drives, or work on files on multiple PCs, you know how hard it is to keep all your files in sync on those devices and computers. The Sync Center is Windows Vista's answer. It's the central location for syncing all your devices and network folders.

When devices and network folders are synced, Windows Vista copies and updates files and folders in both locations. So, for example, if you've made changes to files on both your PC and the device, Windows Vista will perform actions on both of them so that they have identical files and folders.

You can also use the Sync Center for synchronizing files across a network, via offline files. With offline files, you can get access to files on a shared network folder, even if your laptop is not currently connected to the network. Offline files allow you to open files, work on them when you're disconnected, and then update them at a later time when the connection has been reestablished.


Control commonly used mobility settings.


To open

Control Panel Mobile PC Windows Mobility Center


Description

The Windows Mobility Center Panel offers quick access to turn on and off and customize a variety of commonly used mobility settings.



Windows Vista Pocket Reference
Windows Vista Pocket Reference: A Compact Guide to Windows Vista (Pocket Guides)
ISBN: 0596528086
EAN: 2147483647
Year: N/A
Pages: 63

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