Chapter 6


Chapter 6

  1. The Good Work Project consists of research teams at Stanford University (under my direction), Harvard University (under the direction of Howard Gardner), and the Claremont Graduate University (under the direction of Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi). The philanthropy study has been supported in part by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and the Atlantic Philanthropies. For more information about the project, see www.goodworkproject.org.

  2. A. Carnegie, “Wealth,” North American Review 148 (1889): 653–64.

  3. See W. Schambra’s article “The Friendship Club and the Well- Springs of Civil Society,” available on-line at www.schumachersociety.org/lec-sch.html.

  4. Details of this story have been altered at the request of the recipient, but any nonprofit research center will recognize the general pattern.

  5. See Education Week, October 21, 2000, for further details on the disappointing outcomes of the school reform movement as well as some rare exceptions.



Chapter 7

  1. F. Oser, Moralische Selbsbestimmung: Modelle Der Entwicklung und Erziehung im Wertebereich, Berlin: Klett-Cotta, 2001.

  2. New York Times, November 16, 2001, p. C1.

  3. Raymond Chandler, The Blue Dahlia, Paramount Productions, 1946.

  4. Business Week, August 12, 2002, pp. 55–56.

  5. Arthur Bowman, founder of Bowman’s Accounting Report, quoted in ibid., p. 54.

  6. Economist, January 18–24, 2003, pp. 11–12.



Index

A

Abilene Christian University, 127

Accounting scandals, 152–53

AMEC Construction Management, 97, 121–22

Amway, 104

Andersen, Arthur, 152–53

Anti-mentors, 114–15, 149–50

Apollo Group, 78–83

Apple Computer, 83, 92

Apprenticeships, 158–59

Aristotle, 110, 111

Aspirian, 61

AT&T, 37

Augustine, Norm, 117–18



Index

B

Balzac, Honoré de, 45

Barnum, P. T., 33

The Body Shop, 75–78

Built to Last (Collins and Porras), 39

Business ethics

character and, 123–25

characteristics of, 49

definition of, 46, 49

developing commitment to, 110–11

examples of commitment to, 111–23

importance of, 71–72

personal growth and, 119–21

practical value of, 111–13

as preemptive choice, 113–14

prevalence of, 54

purpose and, 114–19

relationships and, 54–55

standard approach to, 107–10

Business morality. See also Business ethics; Empathy; Generative morality; Philanthropy; Restrictive morality

building rewarding career with, 50–55

cynical view of, 6–7, 13, 43–46

four dimensions of, 46–59

pyramid of, 57–58

Business schools, failure of, 62–63, 108–9

Business world

cynical view of morality in, 6–7, 13, 43–46

importance of moral identity in, 59–63

mixed motives in, 12–14

reasons for entering, 4

refugees from, 1–2, 5



Index

C

Calling, work as, 41, 86–87, 158

Carnegie, Andrew, 55, 132–33, 138

Center for Servant-Leadership, 37

Change

effects of, 3

resistance to, 65, 78

Character

ethics and, 123–25

importance of, 35

Charities. See Philanthropy

Chesterton, G. K., 44

Cirrus Logic, 61, 93

Citizenship, sense of, 57

CNN, 118–19

Colby, Anne, 5, 10, 27, 35, 60

Collins, James, 39

Communication

effective, 34–35

empathic morality and, 53–54, 94–95

honesty and, 32–34

importance of, 30–31

Community relations, building, 127–28

Co-opetition, 54

The Copenhagen Centre, 19

Covey, Steven, 45

Creativity. See also Generative morality

Golden Rule and, 91, 102–3, 106

spiritual faith and, 70–71, 85–86

Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly, xi, xii, xiii, 15, 60, 70

Cynicism, 6–7, 13, 43–46, 158